Geology and Geography

Zion National Park

We drove from Las Vegas to Zion National Park and along the way we emerged onto the western side of the Colorado Plateau. At Zion, we observed lower Mesozoic deposits of the Kayenta Shale and the Navajo Sandstone.

Setting up camp at Zion National Park.

Setting up camp at Zion National Park.

 

On the trail to the Emerald Pools, Dr. Phillips (right) stops to point out a recent landslide that temporarily impeded flow of the Virgin River.

On the trail to the Emerald Pools, Dr. Phillips (right) stops to point out a recent landslide that temporarily impeded flow of the Virgin River.

 

The group takes a break for a photo at Middle Emerald Pool. From left to right: Stefanie Burney, Salyna Dvorovy, Darlene Montesanti, Ashley Cuthill, Bryan Chavis, Garrett Adams, McNeill Lytch, Ashley Gentry, and Danielle Powers.

The group takes a break for a photo at Middle Emerald Pool. From left to right: Stefanie Burney, Salyna Dvorovy, Darlene Montesanti, Ashley Cuthill, Bryan Chavis, Garrett Adams, McNeill Lytch, Ashley Gentry, and Danielle Powers.

 

A view up the sheer cliffs of the Navajo Sandstone at Upper Emerald Pool. Students noted large scale cross-bedding, indicative of aeolian deposits, and vertical cracks (joints) in the canyon walls.

A view up the sheer cliffs of the Navajo Sandstone at Upper Emerald Pool. Students noted large scale cross-bedding, indicative of aeolian deposits, and vertical cracks (joints) in the canyon walls.