Teaching and Learning Center

Teaching Writing in a Discipline

Teaching Writing in a Discipline

"Teaching Writing in Writing Enriched and Writing in the Discipline Courses," with Dr. Michael Carter, Department of English, North Carolina State University on Tuesday, February 23 and Wednesday, February 24.

The workshop will include information about teaching writing from a disciplinary perspective and teaching a writing-intensive course. In teaching writing from a disciplinary perspective, the goal is to help instructors make the connection between the ways of knowing in their disciplines and the ways of writing in their disciplines. Participants of the workshop will be able to:

  • Identify and analyze the particular ways of knowing that define their disciplines
  • Identify standard ways of writing (genres) in their disciplines that embody the ways of knowing
  • Describe in terms of learning outcomes what students should be able to do to demonstrate their mastery of the ways of knowing and writing in their disciplines

In teaching a writing-intensive course, the focus in on structuring the course for growth in writing and thinking in the discipline, constructing assignments that clearly lay out expectations, establishing a writing process that affords opportunities for reflection and feedback, and evaluating writing to reinforce student learning outcomes. Participants of the workshop will be able to:

  • Describe several principles of growth in writing and thinking in the disciplines that could be used to structure a syllabus
  • Write an assignment sheet that provides sufficient guidance for students to meet the desired expectations and a process that allows for incremental development of the project and opportunities for reflection and feedback
  • Create an evaluation rubric for the assignment in B

Dr. Michael Carter is an Associate Professor in the Department of English and Associate Dean of the Graduate School at North Carolina State University. He is the former Associate Director of the Campus Writing and Speaking Program at North Carolina State University. He is the author of Where Writing Begins: A Postmodern Reconstruction and “Ways of Knowing, Doing, and Writing in the Disciplines” among other publications in the area of Rhetoric and Composition. He holds a PhD in English with a specialization in Rhetoric and Composition from Purdue University.