Map of Campus
Map of Campus
  • FONT SIZE
  • A
  • A

Observatory

Oxendine Science Building

The Herbert G. Oxendine Science Building (1967, 2004), named for an Academic Dean, provides classrooms, laboratories, computer labs, a coffee shop, green house, observatory and offices for Biology, Chemistry and Physics, Mathematics and Computer Science, and Political Science.

The observatory, located north of the Oxendine Science Building, has a 16" Meade LX200GPS Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The telescope has a focal length of 4084 mm and a focal ratio of f/10 with a maximum magnification of 800x. The telescope and dome can be accessed remotely over the Internet. The telescope also has a Santa Barbara CCD camera which produces beautiful deep sky images and can also collect data for photometry.

The greenhouse, also located north of the Oxendine Science Building and west of the observatory, serves as an educational laboratory for students in the Department of Biology.

 Oxendine Science Building

Oxendine Science Building

Oxendine Science Building 

Oxendine Science Building

Observatory 

Observatory

Herbert G. Oxendine 

Herbert G. Oxendine
(1913-1966)

Herbert G. Oxendine was a soft-spoken and tireless leader at the University, in the community and for his church.

He was born in Buie, N.C., on November 7, 1913, and at the time of his death on December 14, 1966, he had served the University in many capacities, including Head of the Education Department and Dean of the Faculty.

A World War II veteran, Dr. Oxendine was the first Lumbee Indian to earn a doctorate. He earned a Bachelor of Science degree from Western Carolina University, a Master's of Education and Doctorate of Education from Boston University.

Dr. Oxendine came to the University in 1953 following a teaching career in the public schools.

A community leader, he directed the Kiwanis Club's summer baseball league. A Civil Rights leader, he fought for the rights of American Indians in education. A church leader, Dr. Oxendine served for many years on the Board of Deacons at the First Baptist Church of Pembroke.

The Science Building was completed approximately one year after Dr. Oxendine's death.