Student Affairs
Student Affairs

Student Handbook

Student Handbook Cover

 

Student Handbook

This Student Handbook has been prepared to acquaint you with The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. In addition to providing general information about the University and the services and activities we offer, the handbook details the social and academic regulations that govern campus life. It is important that you take the time to familiarize yourself with the contents of this handbook and keep it for reference throughout your stay at UNCP.

All policies and regulations in effect when this document went to press are subject to revision by the appropriate authorities at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. The official site for updated policies and regulations is located at www.uncp.edu/policies. All policies and regulations posted on this site supersede any that are included in this publication.

NOTE: To view the information, click the appropriate header to expand/collapse the content.

Officers and Administration

 Officers and Administrators - In process of updating...

 

 

Welcome Messages

Student Handbook: Message from Chancellor Kyle R. Carter

ChancellorI am so pleased to welcome you to UNC Pembroke! Over the next few years, you will find that UNCP is extraordinary in our commitment to you and your success.  You will meet faculty members who know you by name, who will help you achieve academic goals, and who will show you that they care about your progress by directing you to helpful resources if you start to struggle. You are not alone here; you are part of the Pembroke family.

You will find that UNC Pembroke is a very colorful family with an extraordinary history.  Founded in 1887 to educate the local American Indians, the Croatan Normal School has expanded its scope and programming so that, today, the University of North Carolina at Pembroke is a regional comprehensive institution offering 42 undergraduate majors, 18 graduate degrees, award-winning faculty, excellent sports teams, an international program, state-of-the-art clinical laboratories, and much more. Still, we try to remain close to our roots. The Lumbee tribe, centered in Pembroke, remains an important part of our university culture. You will see reminders of this university’s history in our student body, our buildings, in public artwork, in cultural events, in our mascot, and in our teams’ name—your name, now—the Braves.

As a member of the BraveNation, you are part of a student body that includes all races and nationalities, all socio-economic backgrounds, all ages, and all career trajectories. UNC Pembroke is the most diverse institution in the UNC system and one of the most diverse in the nation. You in your uniqueness will become part of the whole here. In fact, we expect you to be part of the whole. The Pembroke family—the faculty and staff who will help you along in your college career—is committed to making your time here a rich and rewarding experience. But we expect you to do your part, too. I urge you to become engaged in the rich campus life that UNC Pembroke offers: excellent division II sports, extensive intramural athletics, theater and the arts, more than 80 clubs and organizations, an active student government association, service learning opportunities, a lively campus community, and more.

So, along with the faculty and staff and all the members of the BraveNation, I’m excited to welcome you to UNC Pembroke! In the years to come, you will discover ways to connect with your professors, your classmates, and your alma mater. You will learn and grow and work to achieve your potential. And along the way you will become part of our story and we will become part of yours. We are looking forward to it; let’s make it a great year.

Sincerely,

Kyle R. Carter
Chancellor

 

Student Handbook: Message from VICe Chancellor for Student Affairs, John R. Jones, III., Ph.D

John JonesWelcome Home! On behalf of the staff in the Division of Student Affairs, we are excited to have you in the Braves family. As the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, I have the privilege of leading a talented and dedicated staff committed to our mission of fostering student success. We are excited that you joined our family and we look forward to assisting you in pursuing your academic and personal goals.

The Division of Student Affairs works with faculty and staff throughout the campus community to build and create an exceptional out of class experience for you that complements your academic curriculum. We will challenge you to embrace differences and adapt to change, think critically, communicate effectively, and become responsible citizens. In short, we will provide a comprehensive, integrated student experience which embraces learning, personal and social responsibility, leadership development, healthy lifestyles, and the appreciation of diverse ideas, cultures, and people. Although UNC Pembroke prepares you for life and leadership within a diverse society, we are also here to serve you, as well as your family, and members of the greater university community.

We are committed to providing you a phenomenal campus experience in a highly personalized and student-centered environment. However, we need your assistance by becoming engaged in campus life. I challenge and encourage you to take advantage of everything that UNC Pembroke offers. Get involved in the many campus activities and intercollegiate athletic events. Take advantage of the plethora of student organizations, theater and the arts, and the service learning opportunities. What will your legacy be? How will you integrate yourself into the campus experience? How will you engage the campus community and make you and the campus better? We expect you to immerse yourself into the curriculum and co-curriculum experiences and become an active member of the Braves family.

The Division of Student Affairs includes Housing and Residence Life, Student Health Services, Student Involvement and Leadership, Counseling and Psychological Services, the Career Center, the Chavis University Center, Multicultural and Minority Affairs, Greek Life, Community and Civic Engagement, Campus Recreation, Student Conduct, and Campus Safety and Emergency Operations. Please be sure to get to know the Student Affairs staff. We are here for you!

Again, I welcome you to the Braves family!

John R. Jones, III., Ph.D 
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs

General Information

Click the following link to access that section of the Student Handbook:

 

Historical Sketch

Mission of the University

Founded in 1887 as a school for the education of American Indians, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke now serves a distinctly diverse student body and encourages inclusion and appreciation for the values of all people. UNC Pembroke exists to promote excellence in teaching and learning, at the master's and undergraduate levels, in an environment of free inquiry, interdisciplinary collaboration, and rigorous intellectual standards.

Our diversity and our commitment to personalized teaching uniquely prepare our students for rewarding careers, postgraduate education, leadership roles, and fulfilling lives. We cultivate an international perspective, rooted in our service to and appreciation of our
multi-ethnic regional society, which prepares citizens for engagement in global society. Students are encouraged to participate in activities that develop their intellectual curiosity and mold them into responsible stewards of the world.

UNCP faculty and staff are dedicated to active student learning, engaged scholarship, high academic standards, creative activity, and public service. We celebrate our heritage as we enhance the intellectual, cultural, economic, and social life of the region.

Vision Statement

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke will challenge students to embrace difference and adapt to change, think critically, communicate effectively, and become responsible citizens. Working from a strong foundation in the liberal arts, we will increase opportunities to infuse our curriculum with interdisciplinary innovation while promoting undergraduate and graduate research as well as international opportunities.

Core Values Statement

The faculty and staff of UNC Pembroke are guided by the following set of core values: (1) the commitment to serving the local region; (2) the creation, exploration, evaluation, and articulation of ideas; (3) the value of a liberal arts foundation as the basis of self-realization and lifelong learning; (4) the importance of honor and integrity to learning and leadership as we educate students to be stewards of the world; (5) the appreciation of the American Indian history of the University and local community; (6) the appreciation of diversity and respect for the dignity and worth of every individual; (7) the commitment to prepare graduate and undergraduate students to succeed in an ever-changing and increasingly technological global environment; (8) the accessibility of education which leads to the enhancement of the economy and culture in the region; and (9) the maintenance of a sustainable, safe, healthful, attractive, and accessible campus.

Institutional Distinctiveness Statement

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke distinguishes itself from peer institutions by offering an affordable, highly personalized, student-centered education to diverse students. Founded in 1887 as an American Indian institution to serve the Lumbee people, UNCP now is also comprised of students, faculty, and staff who possess differing attributes based on race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability status, national origin, age, political affiliation, religion, and other characteristics. Diversity grounds intellectual pursuits and provides us with opportunities for discovery and ways to integrate all individuals and groups into the larger community, respecting and valuing their uniqueness while simultaneously advancing the University’s historical tradition. UNC Pembroke thus prepares its students for life and leadership within a diverse society.


Mission of the Student Affairs Division

Vision Statement

The Division of Student Affairs strives to transform students into engaged citizens.

Mission Statement

The Division of Student Affairs empowers students to succeed, facilitates active learning, develops cultural appreciation, promotes responsible citizenship, and ensures a robust campus experience for student engagement.

Core Values

  • We facilitate growth that empowers academic success, balance and creative innovation.
  • We provide excellence in student-centered programming.
  • We maximize campus life experiences and promote student success through collaboration.
  • We value, establish, and embrace an inclusive community.
     

2014 -2019 Goals

Goal 1: Build a Robust Campus Environment

We will re-imagine and create physical space to foster our campus environment. We will also foster participation with and contribution from students, faculty, staff, and the greater community. What communication strategies have been improved, developed, and utilized.

Goal 2: Develop Enriching Student Experiences

We will develop opportunities that connect students with self-defined purposes.  Furthermore students will be leveraged with experiential learning to supplement current practice to meet the student’s learning objectives.

Goal 3: Promote a Campus of Value Based, Ethical Standards, Responsible and Personal Wellness

We will make an assertive effort to create responsible global student citizens, as well as maintaining a safe campus community.  We will individually and collectively model communitarian values, ethical standards, individual responsibility, and personal wellness.

Goal 4: Create an Inclusive, Diverse, and Respectful Campus

We will leverage our community’s diversity to develop a better sense of cultural appreciation, and teach and model cultural competency. We will infuse into our learning opportunities respectful dialogue about cultural, ethnic, religious, gender, sexuality, ability, socioeconomic, and other similarities and differences.

Goal 5: Cultivate a Sustainable Campus for Student Success

We will leverage staff, faculty, community talent, knowledge, and skills to support the professional development of our community. We will nurture and recognize the quality and commitment in our community as well as creating an institution of choice for staff and faculty.

Office for Student Affairs

The Division of Student Affairs consists of 13 departments, each of which is responsible for providing a variety of student support, services, educational programs, and facilities. Programs, services, and facilities are designed to integrate students into university life and to enhance students' total development with particular emphasis on intellectual, social, cultural, emotional, leadership, civic, and personal development within a diverse community.

Staff members are dedicated individuals characterized by their commitment to creating and supporting a rich learning environment in a community of care and mutual respect that leads to student success.

Office of Student Conduct

The mission of the Office of Student Conduct is to administer a campus student discipline program that encourages students to develop as responsible adults. Through programming, advisement, and interaction, we seek to increase awareness of University expectations of student behavior, encourage civility, and promote self responsibility. We believe in promoting an environment which encourages students to uphold community standards, enhancing community through education, and striving to provide a comprehensive student discipline program that encourages all students to develop into productive members of society. The Office of Student Conduct is located in Suite 329 in Lumbee Hall. For more information, contact us by phone at 910.521.6851. Office hours are Monday-Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Office of Student Involvement and Leadership

The mission of the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership, is to provide meaningful co- and extra-curricular development and educational opportunities for students in a highly personalized and student-centered educational environment in order to challenge students to embrace difference, adapt to change, think critically, communicate effectively, and become responsible citizens as outlined by the University's mission.

Guided by the University's Core Value's, the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership is committed to enhancing the overall educational experience of students by: (1) providing students, at a variety of abilities and engagement levels, with appropriately designed opportunities to develop their leadership capacity and campus engagement in support of becoming life-long learners; (2) involving students in the planning and implementation of co- and extra-curricular activities; (3) supporting positive educational outcomes including the ability to create, function in and maintain a socially just, culturally engaged, civically involved, sustainable and technologically advanced community.

Office for Community and Civic Engagement

The Office for Community and Civic Engagement (CCE) is located in Jacobs Hall, Suite K. The CCE office provides opportunities for students to develop their knowledge and understanding of community and civic responsibility through educational programs, volunteerism, service opportunities and civic engagement. The CCE staff advises students on volunteerism, community service, social justice, civic engagement and responsible citizenship.

The CCE curriculum provides an experiential learning approach to student development and active, responsible citizenship.  The core curriculum provides education, awareness and service opportunities for students to become actively engaged in social justice issues and civic responsibility. Students are encouraged to participate in volunteer and monthly service opportunities through the CCE office, as well as student clubs and organizations. The CCE office provides Alternative Break Trip opportunities for students to travel to regional and national locations to engage in activism and service. The CCE office houses a Citizenship Education Library that includes numerous resources for both student organizations and individual students.

Students may document their participation in civic development education and service opportunities via Brave Connect, an online student involvement management system, to create a co-curricular service transcript. The Service Transcript is a complement to the students resume and academic transcript. 

Office for Service Learning

The Office for Service Learning is located within the Office for Community and Civic Engagement (CCE) in Jacobs Hall, Suite M. Service-learning is a teaching and learning strategy that enriches academic and life-long learning by engaging students in meaningful service to the community while gaining valuable knowledge and skills that integrate with course objectives. The service is integrated with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and strengthen communities. At UNCP, faculty and students take part in service-learning to enhance learning and achievement in a wide variety of majors and minors, supported through a partnership between UNCP’s Office for Academic Affairs and Division of Student Affairs.

Students enrolled in service-learning courses are provided with opportunities to apply the concepts, skills, and information learned in the classroom to real world problems in the community. In addition, service-learning gives students the opportunity to develop personal goals and values at the same time accomplishing academic goals. Service-learning empowers students to take part in the life of their communities, as informed, active, and engaged citizens.

Military and Veteran Services

The University Coordinator for Military and Veteran Services is located in the DF Lowry Building, Room 310.  The University of North Carolina at Pembroke assists and supports military-affiliated students through the Military and Veteran Services Office. The Military and Veteran Assistance (MVA) team provides education assistance and coordinates support services for military veterans, active duty service members, and their family members. This team is a collaboration of representative staff, administration, and fellow veteran students providing “veteran friendly” services that assist all military-affiliated students from application to graduation. 

Military and Veteran Services may include application assistance, financial aid and veteran benefits assistance, advising and transition support for a successful education experience.  Military and Veteran students receiving VA education benefits must develop a plan of study upon entering UNCP and declare a major prior to completing 59 semester hours of course work. Veteran Education Assistance liaisons/advisors will make every effort to insure that veteran students register for the courses required by their chosen degree program. 

Military and Veteran students are encouraged to join the Student Veterans of America (SVA) organization. The SVA is a coalition of student veterans groups from college campuses across the United States. The UNCP chapter was founded November 2008.

Multicultural Center

The Multicultural Center (MCC), located in Room 124 of Old Main is open to the entire University community and exists to promote multiculturalism, inclusion, and diversity of the campus by providing a means to increase awareness about cultures and ensure a positive and safe place for differences. The MCC offers changing exhibits showcasing the unique qualities of a variety of cultures. Students who are seeking a means to creatively display their cultural interests and build their personal portfolios are encouraged to prepare an exhibit for display in the Center. A conference room is open to the entire University community Monday thru Friday from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. The MCC is also available for scheduled meetings of student and staff organizations. To inquire about room reservations please contact the Office for Diversity and Inclusion at (910-521-6508).

Office for Diversity and Inclusion

The Office for Diversity and Inclusion (ODI) is located in the Multicultural Center, Room 124 of Old Main. ODI provides leadership and advocacy to support cultural diversity and to prepare students to interact in a diverse world. ODI's main goals are to provide programs and services that support the academic mission of the University by enhancing the educational, personal, cultural, and social development of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke's diverse student populations. As an agent for change, ODI seeks to value cultural diversity in order to promote and empower students through mentoring, advocacy, leadership, multicultural workshops, and diversity awareness programs. ODI is in the business of ensuring that every UNCP student is equipped and linked to the right resources and services that the University and Community have to offer. The staff welcomes all students to participate in the programs, resources, and services provided. We stand by our motto of, "Together in Unity!"

 

Campus Recreation

The Department of Campus Recreation believes that leisure physical activity and enjoyment are vital to a person’s total well‑being. Based upon this belief, Campus Recreation provides a broad and diversified program of recreational activities for the University’s students, faculty, and staff. Patrons have the opportunity to participate in over a dozen intramural activities, multiple club sports, group fitness activities, and trips associated with our (ALS) Adventure Leadership Program. Campus Recreation also provides access to non-organized avenues of recreation through the use of Campbell Wellness Center, Aquatics Center, Auxiliary Gym, and Disc Golf Course. Through the many programs of our department it is our goal to provide our patrons with the opportunity to develop lifetime recreational skills, gain an appreciation for healthy choices, and develop positive social interactions that lead to lifelong relationships.

Study Abroad Office

A division of the International Programs office, the Study Abroad office is the central resource for students interested in adding an increasingly-important international dimension to their studies and to their resume, and acquiring the skills necessary to succeed in today's global economy. Programs, most of which are in English, are available in exciting locations throughout the globe. The Study Abroad office assists students (and their parents) in selecting the perfect destination, obtaining course transfer approval, and coordinating financial aid, travel and documents (and more), while also preparing students for life and studies abroad. The office also acts as a point of contact and support while students are abroad, and assists with re-entry and credit transfer. A wealth of opportunities in all majors and interests exist, and are surprisingly affordable. For more information, stop by the International Programs office, call Laura Dobson 910-521-6573, or email laura.dobson@uncp.edu visit the International Programs web site.

The Career Center

The Career Center is located in the Chavis University Center, Room 210. The Center's purpose is to assist students and alumni with career planning and the job search. Career counselors are available to assist students in deciding their major, assessing their skills and interests, exploring job information, writing resumes and cover letters, polishing interviewing skills, and developing job-search strategies. The Career Center also coordinates the On-Campus Student Employment Program for students seeking on-campus jobs.

The Career Library maintains resources related to college majors, careers, employers, graduate schools, internships/co-ops, and the job market. Web services are available for students to post resumes and references, view job listings, and network with employers.

Workshops are offered throughout the year on a wide range of career planning topics. The following events are scheduled annually: the Professional and Career Development Institute, Freshman Seminar tours, Career Expo, Business Etiquette Dinner, and the Teacher Education Fair.

Representatives from business, industry, government, health care agencies, and public schools visit The Career Center during the fall and spring semesters to interview students and alumni for job and internship vacancies.

The Career Peers are students that serve UNCP as Career Center student ambassadors, assisting with marketing, workshops, and events. Interested students may apply via The Career Center's Web site or by visiting the office.

For more information view The Career Center's Web site at www.uncp.edu/career or make an appointment. Office hours are 8:00 am-5:00 pm, Monday-Friday.

Office of Greek Life

The Office of Greek Life, located in the Chavis University Center, Suite 220, is committed to creating a values-based leadership experience by enhancing student development through active participation in nineteen fraternity and sorority chapters at UNC Pembroke. The Office of Greek Life supports and promotes academic excellence, student involvement in co-curricular activities, career development, social responsibility, social justice, civic engagement, and cultural awareness.

Counseling and Psychological Services

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke believes that education includes the development of the whole person. At UNCP Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) is central to the mission of the university. Our services help students to achieve their educational goals, to learn the process of problem solving, to increase and enhance their capacity for satisfying interpersonal relationships, and to make full use of their potential for continued growth beyond their educational experience. The mission of CAPS is to help students define and accomplish personal and academic goals while maintaining balance in their lives. Our services are directed towards enhancing the skills, which students bring with them to UNCP, and encouraging the development of skills, which will make students more successful both at UNCP and beyond.

Our center offers confidential individual, couples and group counseling, educational workshops, psychiatric evaluations and medication monitoring, and clinical/educational assessments. Licensed professionals provide counseling services for UNCP students without cost. Typical concerns addressed are depression, anxiety, disordered eating, family concerns, alcohol and drug issues, self-esteem, sexuality and many more. Services are typically provided through walk-in, by appointment, and when crisis occurs.  Urgent care needs can be addressed immediately.

Our clinical case manager works closely with many offices throughout campus to ensure a continuity of support for a student who may be struggling with psychological, intellectual and social issues that affect overall quality of life.  The case manager oversees the CARE team, coordinates off campus services and auxiliary services that a student might need such as shelter and food when a student is homeless and/or hungry. www.uncp.edu/sa/care_team.htm

With the addition of our Collegiate Recovery Community grant CAPS has taken steps toward meeting the needs of students in recovery from drug or alcohol addictions. Fall 2014 CAPS will be launching a collegiate recovery community. Opportunities for students to engage in fun, supportive, and sober activities has been made possible by support from the Stacie Mathewson Foundation & Transforming Youth Recovery. The grant is overseen by CAPS alcohol and other drug specialist.

Sexual Misconduct Advocacy and Resource Team (SMART) is coordinated by CAPS sexual assault advocate. The goal of the team is to serve as an on-campus resource/advocate for students who are victims of sexual violence, interpersonal violence and gender based hate crime. www.uncp.edu/caps/violence

Student Health Services

The Student Health Services (SHS), located adjacent to Hickory Hall and across from the Mary H. Livermore Library, offers outpatient health care to students. The facility is supervised by a nurse director, contracted physician, nurse practitioner, nurses and support staff. Students enrolled at UNCP pay a Student Health Fee as part of their tuition each semester. This fee pays for most services provided by SHS. Part-time students and University personnel may receive nursing and first-aid services; however, if part-time students elect to pay the full health services fee they can also receive care by the nurse practitioner. Students referred for hospitalization, specialty care, and diagnostic services not offered through SHS are responsible for the cost of these services, unless covered by health insurance. All registered students taking six (6) or more credit hours are required to purchase the student injury and sickness insurance plan, with the following exceptions: distance education students and students who submit evidence of equivalent coverage satisfactory to the policyholder may waive coverage. If you do not submit a waiver online, you will automatically purchase the Student Health Insurance and the charge will remain on your student account.

Medical excuses for students may be obtained from Student Health Services only when the student sees the nurse practitioner BEFORE class is missed. This includes resident students and commuting students.

Available medical services include primary medicine, routine gynecologic examinations and contraceptive health education, confidential HIV testing, allergy injections, laboratory services, nursing services, minor injury treatment, and health education programs. The Contraceptive Health Education Clinic and routine gynecologic examinations are by appointment only (910-521-6219). The waiting times for these services vary depending upon the number of patients using the clinic. Individual physical examinations are done prior to student teaching. Physical examinations are also done for some summer session programs.

During the academic year (fall/spring semesters), a nurse is on duty around the clock beginning at 5:00 pm on Sunday through 4:00 pm Friday to treat and evaluate students’ health needs and answer any questions about health problems and other concerns.

For security reasons, the doors to the SHS are locked after 9:00pm.  Ring the doorbell for admittance.  In an emergency on campus or in campus housing, notify the campus police and/or a university community director who will contact SHS at (910) 521-6219.  For emergencies that occur when SHS is closed, students should contact the UNCP Campus Police at (910) 521-6235.

The student’s medical record is available only to the professional staff of SHS and is considered confidential and privileged and may only be released with written permission by the student. Records are retained in SHS eleven years after the student leaves the University and subsequently are destroyed.

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Immunization Policy

Financial Aid Office

The primary role of the Financial Aid Office, located on the second floor of Lumbee Hall, is to provide financial assistance as well as financial counseling to students requesting these services.

This office coordinates a variety of state, federal, private, and institutionally funded aid programs, each with different regulations and requirements. While most of these programs require students to demonstrate financial need, there are loan funds available to help stu­dents and parents which are not need based. All students requesting consideration for any type of financial aid, including loans, must apply each year. The application, “Free Applica­tion for Federal Student Aid,” should be completed online at www.fafsa.ed.gov. Students should list UNCP’s school code which is 002954. Students and parents can sign the form electronically by registering for a pin number at pin.ed.gov. The application should be submitted by March 1to allow time for processing so awards can be made before fall registration.

To be eligible for financial assistance a student must have a high school diploma or GED; be enrolled as a regular student in an eligible program; be a U.S. Citizen or eligible noncitizen; generally, have a social security number, make satisfactory academic progress; register with Selective Service, if required; and, not be in default on any federal loan or owe a refund on a federal grant. Information about the various financial aid programs at UNCP can be found online at www.uncp.edu/fa.

Policy on Satisfactory Academic Progress For Financial Aid Eligibility

General Information

The federal financial aid programs at UNCP are authorized under Title IV of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. The Act states that a student must maintain satisfactory academic progress in the course of study s/he is pursuing, according to the standards and practices of the institution at which the student is in attendance. The federal Title IV programs include Federal Pell Grants, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, Federal Work Study, Federal Stafford Loans (subsidized and unsubsidized), Federal Perkins Loans and Federal PLUS loans. For purposes of consistency and equity among all students, UNCP applies the following standards to all students receiving federal Title IV aid and all students receiving any other financial aid, including institutionally and state funded sources.

All students (full time, part time, graduate and undergraduate) who wish to qualify for financial aid while attending UNCP must meet certain standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP). These standards include a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA), a minimum credit hour completion rate and the completion of a degree or program of study within a maximum number of credit hours.

For purposes of determining satisfactory academic progress status and eligibility for financial aid, a student’s academic record is evaluated at the end of each spring semester and at the time s/he applies for financial aid. If a student has a break in enrollment or is suspended or dismissed, then his/her SAP will be reviewed at that time. This evaluation will include a student’s entire academic record at UNCP and will compare the student’s academic record to the standards of Satisfactory Academic Progress. These standards are applied to all semesters or terms during which the student was enrolled, regardless of whether the student received financial aid for those prior terms of enrollment.

Students who fail to meet one or more of the SAP standards at the time their progress is reviewed are not eligible for financial aid, including summer terms. The Office of Financial Aid will notify students of their failure to meet the standards of SAP. Each student is responsible for knowing his/her own status, whether or not s/he receives this notification. Students may view their SAP status via BraveWeb or by contacting the Office of Financial Aid.

Undergraduate Students - Minimum Cumulative Grade Point Average (GPA):

Undergraduate students’ cumulative grade point average (GPA) must meet the University standards of a 2.0 for all attempted hours.

Graduate students must maintain the appropriate GPA as defined and monitored by the Graduate School. 

Financial aid eligibility will be canceled immediately for any student who is suspended or dismissed.

 

Minimum Credit Hour Completion Rate:
All students must earn a minimum of two-thirds or 67% of the credit hours that they have attempted including transfer hours. To determine a student’s credit hour completion rate, divide the total earned credit hours by the total number of credit hours attempted at UNCP.

Example: The student below has earned 82 credit hours at UNCP and transferred in 62 earned hours for a total of 144 earned credit hours. This student has attempted 109 hours at UNCP and transferred in 62 attempted hours for a total of 171 attempted credit hours. Divide 144 (earned credit hours) by 171 (attempted credit hours). This student’s credit hour completion rate is 84%.

 

Attempted
Hours

Passed
Hours

Earned
Hours

GPA
Hours

Quality
Points

GPA

UNCP 109 82 82 90 202.90 2.254
Transfer 62 62 62 0 0 .000
Degree 171 144 144 90 202.90 2.254

To earn hours at UNCP, a student must receive a grade of A, B, C, D, or P including + or -. All other grades including F, I, W, AU or NR do not earn hours. If a student withdraws from a class after the drop/add period, those credit hours for which the student earns a grade of W are counted as attempted but not earned hours.

Therefore, withdrawing from classes after the drop/add period will negatively affect the student’s ability to satisfy the minimum percentage completion rate requirement.

If a student repeats a course, both the original and the repeated courses will count toward the attempted and earned credit hours. Courses for which a student earns a grade of incomplete (I) are counted as attempted but not earned credit hours. If a student receives a grade in place of an incomplete after his/her academic progress has been evaluated, it is the responsibility of the student to notify the Office of Financial Aid.

Completion of a Degree or Program of Study within a Maximum Time Frame:

Each student has a maximum time frame during which s/he can receive financial aid. To remain eligible for financial aid at UNCP, undergraduate students must complete their degree program requirements within 150 percent of the published length of their degree program. All attempted hours are counted, including transfer hours, whether or not financial aid was received, or whether or not the coursework was successfully completed.

As an example, if an undergraduate degree program requires 120 semester credit hours to complete, then a student is eligible for financial aid during the first 180 attempted credit hours. (120 x 150% = 180 maximum attempted credit hours for financial aid eligibility).

A full time undergraduate degree student pursuing his/her first undergraduate degree will be considered academically eligible for aid for no more than five academic years of enrollment at the University. Any hours transferred in to UNCP will be included in the five year calculation.

A student’s academic load is determined at the end of the drop/add period each semester. If a student reduces his/her course load below the minimum, the Office of Financial Aid must be notified and some aid funds may have to be repaid. The student is responsible for notifying the OFA if a reduction occurs or is contemplated.

Undergraduate Second Degree Students

A student working toward a second or subsequent baccalaureate degree is expected to make the same satisfactory progress and enroll for the same minimum course load when receiving financial aid as that stated above. These students will normally be eligible for loans only, and eligibility will be limited to no more than two additional academic years. All attempted hours at UNCP, as well as transfer hours are counted toward the maximum attempted hours for all students. The number of hours is not reset based on completion of a prior Undergraduate degree.

Graduate Students

A graduate student is considered to be making satisfactory academic progress for financial aid purposes, if s/he has completed two-thirds or 67% of all hours attempted, regardless of whether the hours attempted are at the undergraduate or graduate level. Should a graduate student carry an incomplete beyond one semester, then s/he will not be considered to be making satisfactory progress for financial aid purposes and will not be eligible for further financial assistance until the incomplete has been removed. Once the student notifies the Office of Financial Aid that the incomplete has been removed and a grade has been posted, the student regains eligibility for financial aid. The student may receive aid for the semester during which the incomplete is removed if the semester has not yet ended. If it has ended then the student regains eligibility for financial aid for the next term.

Graduate students must complete their degree within the maximum time frame as defined and monitored by the Graduate School.
Students admitted to the Graduate School on provisional basis will receive financial aid for one academic year only.  Provisional admits must be fully accepted/admitted to the Graduate School in order to be eligible for financial aid beyond their first academic year.

To be considered full-time, students must enroll for at least six (6) graduate hours each semester. Academic load is determined at the end of the drop/add period each semester. If hours are dropped below these levels, the student must notify the Office of Financial Aid, and some funds may have to be repaid.

Withdrawing from Classes

If a student withdraws from a semester in which he/she is receiving financial aid, the student may be required to repay some or all of the financial aid received for the term. The amount to be repaid depends on the date of withdrawal. Federal regulations state that a student earns financial aid by remaining in class for at least 61% of the semester in which aid is being received. If a student withdraws prior to that time, the Financial Aid Office will determine the amount to be returned after performing a federal calculation at the point of withdrawal. Students may owe a balance to the University in these cases. Specific information regarding the University’s refund for not completing the entire semester may be obtained from the University Student Accounts Office.

Incompletes

For a discussion of how incomplete grades and audited courses are figured in the quality points averages, please see the University Catalog under Academic Procedures and Policies. Withdrawals and incompletes are considered attempted but not earned hours. Audited courses are not considered as attempted nor earned credits.

Repeated Coursework

If a student repeats a course, both the original course and the repeated course will count toward attempted and earned credit hours. Both attempts will also count in the GPA calculation in accordance with the University’s Repetition of Coursework policy. Students should be aware that financial aid may not cover all repeated courses. Most financial aid programs will cover only one repeat of a previously passed course. Students considering repeating a previously passed course are strongly encouraged to consult with the Office of Financial Aid regarding repeated coursework.

Receiving All F's in a Semester

If a student earns all Fs in a semester in which he/she is receiving financial aid, the student must show proof of class attendance that semester in order to be eligible for federal financial aid in subsequent semesters. If a student cannot get proof from professors that classes were attended, according to federal regulations, the student will be required to pay financial aid back based on the federal calculation and using the 50% point of the semester as the withdrawal date. Students may owe a balance to the University in these cases.

Dropping Classes

If a student withdraws from a class after the census date and receives a “W,” no financial aid will need to be paid back. However, if a student has a class completely removed from his/ her transcript, some financial aid may need to be paid back. Students may owe a balance to the University in these cases.

Teacher Certification Students

If a student is taking at least six hours per semester toward a teacher certification, according to federal regulations, a Document of Intent Form must be obtained from the Education Department stating that the student is pursuing a certification in order to qualify for federal student loans.

Special Admitted Graduate Students

If a student has been granted a “special admit” status through the School of Graduate Studies and taking at least three hours per semester, according to federal regulations, a letter from the Dean of Graduate Studies must be obtained stating that the student has been conditionally admitted to the program. These classes must be pre-requisites in the student’s major in order for him/her to qualify for federal student loans.

Regaining Eligibility for Financial Aid

Students who have failed to meet one or more of the SAP requirements are not eligible for financial aid. These students will not be eligible for financial aid for twelve consecutive months. However, financial aid eligibility may be regained if:

  • The student raises his/her cumulative GPA to the minimum standard as defined in this Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy requirements through hours earned at UNCP within the student’s program of study (without financial aid);
  • And/or, the student’s credit hour completion rate has been brought up to the standard as defined in this Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy requirements by successfully completing coursework within the program of study at UNCP (without financial aid).

Appeals Process

Students who do not meet satisfactory academic standards will be subject to a strict monitoring policy and appeals process with the intention of moving the students toward academic progress and graduation. Student grades will be reviewed at the completion of the spring semester to determine eligibility for the following academic year unless the student has a break in enrollment or is suspended/dismissed, then SAP will be reviewed at that time.

The monitoring policy and appeals process is as follows:

Financial Aid Probation – If a student does not meet satisfactory academic progress, s/he will be denied his/her financial aid. The student will be allowed to appeal this decision by submitting an appeal which should include an attached plan of action that officially outlines the special arrangements that the student has made for tutoring or other support services to help assure academic improvement in the future. Appeals must include a detailed description of the extenuating circumstances that occurred during the semester in which the student failed to meet this policy. The appeal must also include all necessary documentation to support the existence of the circumstances described and evidence that the circumstances have been resolved. The plan must include steps being taken to ensure satisfactory academic performance, including a written plan for academic success in the coming academic term. Events/circumstances that merit an appeal include, but are not limited to:

  • Personal or family emergency
  • Death or extended illness of an immediate family member which results in greater family responsibilities for the student
  • Unanticipated, serious medical difficulty (excluding chronic conditions – students are responsible for properly balancing school work with known chronic conditions)
  • Serious psychological difficulty

The appeals and all attached documentation will be reviewed by a committee. If a student's appeal is approved, s/he is subject to the probation requirements as follows:

a. No earned grades below a C (including a C-)

b. No withdrawals (grades of W) from classes

c. No incompletes (grades of I)

Students seeking to reestablish eligibility for financial aid by submitting an appeal remain ineligible for financial aid or deferment of payment until the appeals process is complete and a decision has been determined by the Committee. Students should be prepared to pay tuition, fees and other educational expenses until s/he has been approved to receive financial aid.

Veterans

Veterans eligible for benefits under Chapters 30, 31, 32, 35 or 1606 must make application for their benefits. For information regarding eligibility or application forms contact the Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office, 251 North Main Street, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, 1-800-827-1000, or the Financial Aid Office, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, 910-521-6285. Transfer students receiving VA benefits should complete VA Form 22-1995, Request for Change of Program or Place of Training, prior to the time they plan to transfer.

Veterans who enter the University under Chapter 31, Title 38, U.S. Code, Vocational Rehabilitation for Disabled Veterans, and have the approval of the Department of Veterans Affairs will have their University fees paid directly to the University by the U.S. Government.

Students enrolling under provisions of Chapters 30, 32, 35 and 1606 will pay fees at the time of registration and receive a monthly education and training allowance from the Department of Veterans Affairs. Since the first check is usually delayed, a veteran should make arrangements as early as possible.

Once the veteran is enrolled, (s)he must attend classes regularly to continue receiving benefits. Each veteran must notify the Veterans' Counselor in the Financial Aid Office if they reduce his/her hours of enrollment or if they change their major.

Veterans must declare a major by the time they complete 59 credit hours in order to continue to receive benefits.

Veteran Dependents

Children of disabled or deceased veterans may receive financial assistance in the payment of tuition, room, meals, and other required University fees. For information and application forms, students should write to the North Carolina Department of Veterans Affairs, Raleigh, North Carolina.

Loans

Undergraduate students must be enrolled for at least six (6) semester hours in order to be eligible for a Stafford Loan. Graduate students must be enrolled for three (3) semester hours. All students must submit the FAFSA form and a loan application in order to be considered for a loan.

NC National Guard Tuition Assistance

Upon enlistment in the North Carolina National Guard, students will be eligible to apply for up to $1000 per year tuition assistance. The Tuition Assistance Program was established by the North Carolina Legislature to provide educational assistance for members of the North Carolina National Guard.

For further information students can write to NORTH CAROLINA ARMY NATIONAL GUARD, Educational Opportunities, Attn: AGRR, 4105 Reedy Creek Road, Raleigh, NC 27607.

Refund Policy

Tuition Surcharge on Undergraduates

The North Carolina Legislature directed the Board of Governors to impose a fifty percent tuition surcharge on students who take more than 140 credit hours to complete a baccalaureate degree in a four-year program or more than one hundred ten percent (110%) of the credit hours necessary to complete a baccalaureate degree in any program officially designated by the Board of Governors as a five-year program. The calculation of these credit hours taken at a constituent institution or accepted for transfer shall exclude hours earned through the College Board's Advanced Placement or CLEP examinations, through institutional advanced placement or course validation, or through summer term or extension programs.

No surcharge shall be imposed on any student who exceeds the degree credit hour limits within the equivalent of four academic years of regular term enrollment, or within five academic years of regular term enrollment in a degree program officially designated by the Board of Governors as a five-year program.

The undergraduate credit hours to be counted for calculation in the surcharge requirement include: all regular session degree-creditable courses taken at this institution including repeated courses, failed courses and those dropped after your official census date (normally the last date to add a course); and all transfer credit hours accepted by this institution.

The hours excluded from the calculation include:

  1. Those earned through the College Board's Advanced Placement (AP) and College Level Examination Program (CLEP) or similar programs;
  2. Those earned through institutional advanced placement, course validation, or any similar procedure for awarding course credit;
  3. Those earned through the summer session or degree-credit extension division on this campus or at another UNC institution; and
  4. Those transferred from an institution of higher education that is not a constituent institution or a community college established

    pursuant to G.S. 115D-4 that are accepted by a constituent institution prior to August 15, 2013.

James B. Chavis University Center

The Chavis University Center is located in the center of campus and serves as the hub of campus activities. The University Center was dedicated in honor of Dr. James B. Chavis, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs who served UNCP from (1964-1999).

Chavis University Center
Monday-Friday....7:00am - 2:00am
Saturday............9:00am - 2:00am
Sunday.............11:00am - 2:00am

Information Station Hours
Monday-Friday......9:00am - 5:00pm
Saturday..............9:00am - 5:00pm
Sunday..............11:00am - 5:00pm

Game Room Hours
Monday-Friday...9:00am - 12 Midnight
Saturday...........3:00pm - 12 Midnight
Sunday.............3:00pm - 12 Midnight

Snack Bar Hours (World of Wings/Bert's)
Monday-Thursday..8:00am-
11:30pm
Friday...............8:00am-12
midnight 
Saturday...........1:00pm-12 Midnight
Sunday.............3:00pm-    
11:30pm

Computer Lab Hours
Monday-Friday...7:00am - 2:00am
Saturday ..........9:00am - 2:00am
Sunday............11:00am - 2:00am

 

 

 

Hawk's Nest Game Room

The Hawk's Nest is located on the first floor of the Chavis University Center. This area is primarily for the use of UNCP students, faculty, and staff. Designated times are set aside for community use. Reservations for use by University or community organizations can be made in advance through the Game Room manager. Children under 12 years of age must be accompanied by an adult.

Anyone found misusing the furnishings or equipment in the Game Room will be subject to campus disciplinary action and/or criminal prosecution for vandalism. All guidelines posted in the bowling center must be adhered to or violators will be asked to leave. The following rules and regulations govern Game Room usage:

  • No gambling
  • No sitting on game tables
  • No profanity
  • No sitting on game tables
  • No food or drinks allowed in gaming area

Billiards Area

There are six billiards tables in the Game Room. Billiards equipment is available for rental or individuals may supply their own equipment if they choose to, but will be charged for table usage. This area also has two ping pong tables and two foosball tables.

Bowling Lanes

There are eight bowling lanes with automatic scoring technology in the Game Room. Intramurals and scheduled classes have priority in using the lanes. Bowling equipment is available for rental or individuals may supply their own equipment if they choose to, but will be charged for lane usage. This area also has an X-Box Connect and four corn hole boards.

Information Station

The Information Station is located on the first floor of the Chavis University Center.

Some services provided by the Information Station include:

  • Campus and community event information
  • Campus directory of phone numbers
  • Information on University services, policies, and regulations
  • Bulletin board reservations
  • Approval of bulletin board postings
  • Bike rental
  • Commuter lockers
  • Campus and town maps
  • University Center daily schedule of events
  • Campus Lost and Found

University Center Annex

The University Center Annex provides additional programming space for the campus. The Annex has a multi-purpose space, two conference rooms, and offices for the Department of Housing and Residence Life, the Veterans Education and Transition Assistance Office, and campus publications including the Indianhead Yearbook and Aurochs Magazine. Hours for the Annex are determined by scheduled programming in the space. Normal operating hours are 7:30am-5pm Monday-Friday.

Chavis University Center/University Center Annex Rules

General Building Policies

No bicycles, pets (except guide dogs for the blind), skateboards, roller skates, smoking, concealed weapons, or gambling are allowed in the Chavis University Center/University Center Annex. Anyone intoxicated or under the influence of drugs will not be allowed on the premises.

Solicitors, salespersons, peddlers, distributors, or any non-university personnel seeking student contact must have the approval of the Senior Director of University Center and Programs. Only campus organizations registered with the University can sell items in the University Center/University Center Annex and only as a fund-raiser for the organization.

The facilities of the University Center/University Center Annex are open to all members of the campus commu­nity and guests as long as the utilization is consistent with University of North Carolina policies and state and federal laws, and does not disrupt other usage of the facility. All events must be scheduled through the Senior Director of University Center and Programs. University events have priority over non-University events.

Furnishings

Persons shall refrain from placing their feet on the furniture or sitting on the tables. Equipment and furnishings shall not be removed from the building for any reason except upon written permission of the Senior Director of University Center and Programs. No equipment or furnishings may be moved within the building by anyone except those persons authorized by the Senior Director of University Center and Programs.

Guests

Students, staff and faculty are responsible for their guests at all times. Guests will be permitted to use the facilities when accompanied by their host.

Exhibits

All exhibits must be approved by the Senior Director of University Center and Programs.

Chavis University Center/University Center Annex Reservations

The conference rooms, the lounge and mall areas, and the multi-purpose space may be reserved by any chartered campus organization or University department. Individuals interested in establishing a club /organization may hold up to three "interest meetings" in the University Center/University Center Annex. External organizations may also reserve a space in the University Center/University Center Annex with special permission from the Senior Director of University Center and Programs as well as the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.

To reserve a space, an individual or organization must:

  1. Log onto UNCP's online reservation site at http://reservations.uncp.edu to submit a facility request. Requests must be received at least 7 working days prior to the date of the event.
  2. The individual or organization submitting the Facility Reservation Request Form accepts responsibility for the proper use of the facility and equipment as well as proper conduct of the organization's members and guests and must respect the rights of all other groups using the facilities in adjoining areas. Meetings must end by the time indicated on the facility request.
  3. If a meeting or event is canceled, please notify University Center staff at least 48 hours prior to the scheduled date. Failure to give proper notice may subject an organization to the loss of privilege of reserving a room in the facilities for 30 days. No penalty is involved when cancellation occurs before this specified time.
  4. All reservations are considered tentative and subject to cancellation until the Facility Reservation Request has been approved by the Senior Director of University Center and Programs.
  5. No food, drinks or candle burning shall be permitted in any of the conference rooms of the University Center/University Center Annex. Refreshments must be catered by the campus food service.
  6. Nothing is to be attached to the walls, ceilings or glass in any areas of the University Center/University Center Annex without special permission from the Senior Director of University Center and Programs.
  7. Smoking is prohibited in all areas of the University Center/University Center Annex.
  8. All catering including refreshments must be handled by the campus food service. Any catering in the University Center/University Center Annex outside the dining area must be approved by the Senior Director of University Center and Programs.

Chavis University Center Advertisement Policy

  1. ALL forms of advertisement used in the Chavis University Center/University Center Annex must be approved through the University Center or the Information Station.
  2. Posters should be no larger than 24" x 17" in size, unless otherwise approved by the Senior Director of University Center and Programs.
  3. Only four (4) advertisements per event will be approved for display in the Chavis University Center.
  4. Banners may be hung in designated areas, with special permission from the Senior Director of University Center and Programs.
  5. ALL advertisements should be logged in and approved at least one (1) week prior to the event to assure maximum exposure.
  6. ALL advertisements should include contact information of the hosting person/organization.
  7. ALL UNCP postings must include the ADAAA access statement.
  8. Any posters or any other form of advertisement found on display without the approval of the Senior Director of University Center and Programs will be taken down by a staff member.
  9. The Senior Director of University Center and Programs reserves the right to approve any and all advertisements.

Dining Services

Campus dining is dedicated to providing quality food service to the University community. We hope you find our team engaging and responsive to your needs. Each of our dining venues are open to anyone who visits campus. We encourage everyone to experience the convenience and variety offered in each of our dining locations. Once you enter the dining hall, you have unlimited access to a variety of food options. Students that have purchased the carte blanche meal plan have the flexibility leave, and return to eat again during the same dining period. Any non-resident student is eligible to purchase from the resident meal plan options. More information on the various meal plans can be obtained from the dining services website (www.uncp.edu/dining).

Freshman and Upperclassman students in a residence hall are required to purchase one of six meal plans:

  • Carte Blanche + $25 "Bonus Dollars" (Dine In Only) $1,647.40
  • 9 meals/week plan + $475 "Bonus Dollars" $1,609.45
  • 12 meals / week plan + $250 "Bonus Dollars" $1,609.45
  • 12 meals / week plan + $375 "Bonus Dollars" $1,697.40
  • 14 meals / week plan + $125 "Bonus Dollars" $1,609.45
  • 14 meals / week plan + $250 "Bonus Dollars" $1,697.40

Upperclassmen Resident Student Meal Plans Only:

  • 8 meals/week plan + $200 "Bonus Dollars" $1,298.25
  • 10 meals/week plan + $125 "Bonus Dollars" $1,298.25

Commuters and Campus Apartments – Meal Plans (Optional):

Commuters & students residing in apartment may also purchase resident meal plans.

  • 25 meals throughout the semester + $135 “Bonus Dollars” $275.00
  • 50 meals throughout the semester + $300 “Bonus Dollars” $569.25
  • “550” Dining Dollars account $569.25
  • “250” Dining Dollars account $250.00

"Bonus Dollars" is a declining balance account that allows you to make purchases at Starbucks, Papa John’s, Einstein Bros Bagels, Bert’s Cafe, Simply to Go and to buy meals for friends or family in Campus Dining at a “guest rate”. “Bonus Dollars” do not roll forward from semester to semester.

“Dining Dollars
” allow students to add money to their Braves Card for dining purposes only. “Dining Dollars” purchases can be made at Starbucks, Papa John’s, Einstein Bros Bagels, Bert’s Cafe and in the Campus Dining Hall.

Campus dining continually strives to put the customer first. We sincerely hope our efforts have made your life easier and that every interaction you have with our facilities, employees and services is a pleasant one. If a customer misplaces or loses his/her meal card, the Braves One Card Office should be contacted immediately. If the original card is not recovered the student must pay a nonrefundable fee for a new card. These cards, as well as replacements, can be obtained from the Braves One Card Office, Auxiliary Services Building, Monday through Friday, 9:00 am-4:00 pm.

Martin Luther King and Labor Day are holidays. Campus Dining hours will be: Lunch 11:30 am -1:00 pm, Dinner 5:00 pm - 6:30 pm.

Inclement Weather - Dining services will provide food service during extreme weather with modified service.

Dining Calendar

Fall Semester, 2013

  • August 13 (Dinner)
  • August 14-31
  • August 31 - September-2 (Brunch & Dinner)
    September 2 (Labor Day)
  • September 3-30
  • October 1-9
  • October 10-13 (Brunch & Dinner) (Fall Break)
  • October 14-31
  • November 1-26
  • November 27 (Brunch & Dinner)
  • November 28 (Thanksgiving Closed)
  • November 29-December 1 (Brunch & Dinner)
  • December 2-6
  • December 7 (Breakfast) Commencement

Spring Semester, 2014

  • January 12 (Dinner)
  • January 13-19
  • January 20
  • January 21-31
  • February 1-28
  • March 1-7 (Spring Break, Closed)
  • March 8 (Dinner)
  • March 9-31
  • April 1-17
  • April 18-20 (Brunch & Dinner)
  • April 21-30
  • May 1-9
  • May 10 (Commencement)

Dining Hours

Monday-Friday

  • Breakfast 7:15 am-9:00 am
  • Continental 9:00 am-11:00 am
  • Lunch 11:00 am-2:00 pm
  • Deli 2:00 pm-4:30 pm (soup, salad, sandwich)
  • Dinner 4:30 pm-7:00 pm

Saturday

  • Lunch 11:30 am-1:30 pm
  • Dinner 5:00 pm-7:00 pm

Sunday

  • Lunch 11:30 am-1:30 pm
  • Dinner 5:00 pm-7:00 pm

Note: Students must present meal card at each meal.

UNCP Bookstore

The goal of the UNCP Bookstore is to enhance your educational experience with a complete selection of course books, paperbacks, quality school supplies, imprinted sportswear, computer software, greeting cards, gifts, and much more. The UNCP Bookstore is located in the Auxiliary Services Building and the telephone number is 910-521-6222. The Bookstore Web page can be found at www.uncp.edu/bookstore.

UNCP Bookstore Hours

  • Monday-Thursday 7:45 am-6:00 pm
  • Friday 7:45 am-4:00 pm
  • Saturday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm

Convenience Store Hours

  • Monday-Thursday 7:45 am-8:00 pm
  • Friday 7:45 am-4:00 pm
  • Saturday 10:00 am - 2:00 pm

Return Policy

Textbooks may be returned for full credit within the first seven days of the Fall and Spring semesters, and within the first three days of the Summer I and II sessions. Textbooks for pre-sessions, intra sessions and all other abbreviated sessions are eligible for a refund within forty-eight hours of the beginning of the course. The original itemized cash register receipt is required for a refund during the Fall and Spring semesters. The original itemized cash register receipt and a copy of the student's class schedule is required to obtain a refund during summer sessions. New books must be in the original selling condition. A full refund cannot be given for textbooks that have been written in, had the plastic removed, or have been damaged in any way. No refunds will be given on course pack materials or digital textbooks. Textbooks purchased after the seventh day of the Fall or Spring semesters or after the third day of a Summer I or II semester are considered FINAL SALES and no refunds will be given.

Students who drop a course may return their books within 48 hours after the course is dropped, provided the Bookstore has not started processing returns. A copy of the student's detail schedule that reflects the dropped course and a receipt is required. Returns processing starts four weeks after classes begin in the fall and two weeks after classes begin in the summer sessions.

General Merchandise may be returned for a full exchange up to two weeks from the date of purchase provided that it is accompanied by a cash register receipt. Exceptions: there are no refunds on magazines, technology products, opened ink cartridges, gift cards, clearance merchandise, special orders or products marked "no returns."

Computer software cannot be returned once the package has been opened.

Check-Cashing Policy

Checks will be cashed at the Bookstore when the following conditions are met:

  1. Current student identification card is presented.
  2. Payment is made is US dollars.
  3. The check presented is $100 or less and made out to the UNCP Bookstore.

A service charge of $25 US dollars will be assessed for any returned check. For the first returned check you will receive a warning. At that time the check plus the service charge must be paid immediately. If a second check is returned, you will lose your check-cashing privileges for the remainder of the academic year.

Book Usage Policy

EACH PROFESSOR WILL HAVE THE RIGHT TO SELECT TEXTBOOKS FOR EACH COURSE HE OR SHE TEACHES, SUBJECT TO UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS:

  1. Textbooks selected will be retained for a minimum of one regular term semester.
  2. It is permissible to use different textbooks where multiple sections of the same course are taught.
  3. No professor is authorized to order textbooks other than through his/her department head and the Bookstore.

Textbook Buyback

Three types of buyback services are offered at the UNCP Bookstore during the fall and spring semesters; Daily (wholesale), End-of-the-Semester (retail) and Online. Daily buyback services (wholesale) will start two weeks after classes have started and will end two weeks prior to the start of the end-of-the-semester buyback. End of the semester buyback services are offered during exam week. Online buyback services are offered for distance education students and can be accessed on the bookstore web page year round. Limited buyback services are offered throughout the summer. Summer buyback dates are advertised throughout campus and on the bookstore web page.

End of Semester buyback (or retail buyback) is offered at the end of the semester. During retail buy backs (End of Semester), books that are needed for the Bookstore are bought back at half of the purchase price. Books that are not needed by the Bookstore and have a wholesale value are bought at the wholesale value by a wholesale textbook company. Textbooks that have no value to either the Bookstore or the Wholesaler will not be bought back. Students will be required to present a student ID for all buyback transactions.

Web Page

Students can access textbook information via the web page at www.uncp.edu/bookstore.

Givens Performing Arts Center

The Givens Performing Arts Center (GPAC), on the campus of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, is one of the finest performing arts facilities in the southeast. Since opening in 1975, some of the world's greatest artists and productions have graced the GPAC stage and allowed us to share their dreams, their traditions and their art. From Broadway's biggest hits, to show stopping concerts and family entertainment, with just over 1,600 seats, GPAC is home to the best in the performing arts!

In addition to hosting a variety of University, community and regional events, GPAC also presents both a touring season and a youth series each season. The Professional Artist Series features National Broadway musicals and plays as well as culturally diverse concerts, special events and other performing artist. The On Stage for Youth Series introduces elementary school children to the arts with various productions each season. GPAC is also the home stage for the UNCP University Theatre Department. Each season University Theatre students produce and present a number of popular productions.

 

The mission of the Givens Performing Arts Center is to enhance and enrich the cultural development of the University and its constituency in the region by offering a diversified selection of multi-disciplinary arts experiences. The Givens Performing Arts Center is committed to the promotion of cultural awareness as a life-long experience and to the continuing appreciation for diverse cultures through the presentation of quality local, national and international artists. For a complete list of events, special promotions and information on discounts available to UNCP students, please visit www.uncp.edu/gpac.

Mary H. Livermore Library

The Mary Livermore Library, as part of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, subscribes to the goals of its parent unit and those of The University of North Carolina System. Its main function is to provide educational support for The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, and in attempting to provide such support, the Library secures, catalogs, and makes available informational resources relevant to the University curriculum. The Library assists the institution’s instructional program by providing instruction in use of research tools and techniques and promotes scholarship by assisting faculty and students with research. The Mary Livermore Library serves as an information center and a center for cultural enrichment and stimulation locally and regionally. The Library also offers reference assistance, interlibrary loan, self-service photocopying/printing, and computers for student use, multimedia equipment, group study rooms, and a comfortable and reasonably quiet setting for study.

The telephone number for the Circulation Desk is 521-6516; the Reference Desk number is 521-6656. Please consult the website at www.uncp.edu/library to obtain additional library information and access to the Library’s catalog, BraveCat.

The Library’s collection includes over 391,000 volumes, approximately 66,000 print and electronic serial subscriptions, government documents, and an extensive collection of media items. The Library also subscribes to over 200 electronic databases. Staff members are ready to assist you in using the Library to help you get the most out of your studies.

Current library hours and exceptions to these hours can be found at www.uncp.edu/library

Campus Mail Center

The Campus Mail Center and student mailboxes are located at the front of the Auxiliary Services Building. Operating hours are from 8:00 am-4:30 pm, Monday-Friday. Package pickup and other postal services are provided at the mail center. Stamps can be purchased during normal business hours. Outgoing mail boxes are located in most academic and administrative buildings.

In addition to regular US postal service, the Campus Mail Center provides other services to students, staff, and faculty. These additional services include: certified, priority, insured, registered, and express US mail, as well as FedEx and UPS. Some services require an additional handling fee. The Braves Card, cash and personal checks are accepted; ATM and credit cards are not. Money orders are not available.

CERTIFIED MAIL must be first-class mail for which the sender wants written evidence of mailing. The envelope/package must be marked "Certified Mail." If the sender wants written evidence of delivery, the piece of mail must also be marked "Return Receipt Requested." Certified mail does not provide insurance. International mail cannot be certified; it must be sent by registered mail.

PRIORITY MAIL is first-class mail used to expedite items by 2-day service to most domestic and international destinations.

INSURED MAIL is used when the sender wants to insure a letter/package for a dollar value, ranging from $1 to $500. The parcel must be marked "Insured" with the value of the contents marked on the outside. A return receipt may be requested for written evidence of delivery. It is possible to insure third-and fourth-class mail for an additional charge.

REGISTERED MAIL is like certified mail, requires a delivery signature and provides a certain amount of insurance. Registered mail is most commonly used for international mail.

EXPRESS MAIL is available for the sender looking for 1 - 2 days delivery in the US and 3-5 days international delivery. The Campus Mail Center needs to receive this mail by 12:00 pm in order to ensure timely delivery. Please call the Campus Mail Center at extension 6210 or 6162 for additional information.

FEDERAL EXPRESS (FedEx) is an available courier service for overnight, 2nd Day delivery letters, packages or freight at FedEx's published rate. An additional handling fee will be charged. The Campus Mail Center needs to receive this mail by 12:00 pm in order to ensure next-day delivery. Ask for details.

UPS – is an additional "express type" courier service offered at the Campus Mail Center. Overnight, 2nd - Day delivery letters, packages and freight are also available at UPS' published rate. An additional handling fee will be charged. The campus Mail Center needs to receive this mail by 12:00 pm in order to ensure next-day delivery. Ask for details.

A twenty-five dollar ($25.00) deposit is required for all residential student mailboxes. A mailbox will be assigned to each residential student and the key will be issued at the Campus Mail Center. A twenty-five dollar ($25) replacement fee will be charged for each lost mailbox key. If a student withdrawals or transfers, the mailbox key must be returned within thirty (30) days to avoid losing the $25 deposit.

Example of how mail should be addressed to residential students:

UNCP Residential Student Name

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke

UNCP Box (XXXX)

One University Drive

Pembroke, N.C. 28372-5099

Please use the student's full name and correct mailbox number in addressing mail to ensure proper delivery. Failure to address mail correctly could delay delivery. If you have questions or need assistance, please call the Campus Mail Center at 521-6210.

Division of Information Technology (DoIT)

DoIT provides each student access to a number of technology services including BraveWeb, Blackboard, the campus network, and network file storage.  Also, individual students receive a BraveMail email account.  Students may also access specialized applications through UNCP’s
Web-based Virtual Computing Lab.  

Access to all services is enabled through an individual network account created for each student when enrolled.

All students are required to activate their network accounts to use the campus network and associated resources. Any student may activate his or her account in BraveWeb (braveweb.uncp.edu). The code that is needed to activate the account is in each student’s acceptance letter. These accounts are subject to compliance with the UNCP Acceptable Use Policy (AUP) and other policies. The AUP is available in its entirety at www.uncp.edu/doit/aup.

The Security Questions offered when activating one’s account should be answered thoughtfully as the answers are needed to change an expired or forgotten password without assistance from DoIT.

This individual username and password, once activated in BraveWeb, are used to access BraveWeb, computers in labs and classrooms, network file storage, BraveMail, Office WebApps, Blackboard (the campus course management system), the campus wireless network, the Virtual Computing Lab, and UNCP’s residential network.

Passwords

 

Network passwords must be changed every 90 days using BraveWeb at braveweb.uncp.edu. Click on “Change Password” and follow the instructions. Passwords must be unique and may only be used once. If assistance is needed with changing a password, students must present a photo ID to the DoIT Helpdesk in Room 110 of the D.F. Lowry Building. Passwords will not be reset by phone or email without extensive identity verification per UNCP’s Identity Verification Procedure.

Email

 

UNCP email accounts are provided and activated through Microsoft’s Live@EDU and may be accessed from the Internet. Accounts may be activated at www.uncp.edu/doit/bravemail/. University policy DoIT 01 06 states that BraveMail is an official means of communication from the University, and students are expected to read the email sent to their accounts regularly.

Computer Labs

 

Computer labs are available throughout the campus. The labs located in academic buildings are available to all students when not otherwise occupied by a class. The computer lab on the second floor of the Mary Livermore Library is available and staffed during the Library’s operating hours. The computer lab on the first floor of the James B. Chavis University Center is open Monday-Friday, 7 a.m. to 2 a.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to 2 a.m., and Sunday 11 a.m. to 2 a.m., or unless otherwise posted. There are open computer labs in the lobbies of Oak and Pine Halls and at the Village and the University Courtyard Apartments. All students may use the Pine or Oak Hall labs noon until midnight Sunday-Wednesday and until 1 a.m. Thursday-Saturday evening.

ResNet

 

ResNet provides Internet access for students with their own computers in all University-provided housing which includes residence halls, University Village Apartments and University Courtyard Apartments. For information on ResNet, see “UNCP’s Residential Computer Network - ResNet,” in Section IV of this document, or visit www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet.


Wireless Devices

All academic and residential buildings have wireless access.  Other buildings with wireless include Lumbee Hall, the James B. Chavis University Center, the University Center Annex, and portions of Jacobs Hall. Wireless accessibility is also available in many outside locations including around the Mary Livermore Library and the James B. Chavis University Center.  BraveWiFi is available on campus except inside University Housing.  To register for BraveWiFi, connect to that network, open a browser and complete the registration by entering your username and password. ResidentialWiFi is available in University Housing only. For information about the ResidentialWiFi network, see “UNCP’s Residential Computer Network - ResNet,” in Section IV of this document, or visit www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet.

 

Blackboard

Blackboard (blackboard.uncp.edu/) is the course management system used by UNCP to provide online resources and activities for traditional, hybrid and online courses. Students access Blackboard using their University username and password. Assistance is available for Blackboard usage 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday at the DoIT Helpdesk in D.F. Lowry Building, room 110, via telephone at 910-521-6260 and email at helpdesk@uncp.edu.  Blackboard support by telephone and email is also available Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m., Fridays, 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 3 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.

BraveWeb

BraveWeb provides access to a number of self-service applications which allow users to register for classes, check grades, see class schedules, review financial aid information, review charges and make payments for tuition and fees, apply for housing, control directory information, and set up insurance waivers. Students activate their network account and email account as well as change their associated password from BraveWeb.  Please see braveweb.uncp.edu for more information.

Helpdesk

 

Helpdesk support for all other technology issues and problems is available 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday-Friday at the DoIT Helpdesk in the D.F. Lowry Building, room 110 and via telephone at 910-521-6260 and email at helpdesk@uncp.edu. Support is also available by telephone and email Monday-Thursday, 8 a.m. to 11:30 p.m., Fridays, 8 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., Saturdays, 9 a.m. to 10:30 p.m., and Sundays, 3 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.  Assistance is also available in the computer lab on the second floor of the Mary Livermore Library.

Student Technology Assistance

 

Students needing additional assistance in using computer applications should seek help at the Mary Livermore Library Computer Lab.  Individual, hands-on assistance as well as group training sessions are offered for students in various applications including Microsoft Office, graphic applications and Web development.  Assistance is available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Braves (ID) Card

A non-transferable photo identification card is issued to each student at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. The ID card, also known as the BravesCard, allows students to check out materials from the Mary Livermore library, access recreational services, Student Health Services, the Givens Performance Arts center and athletic events. For students that live in campus residence halls, BravesCards are also set to work in campus dining facilities.

If students receive an allowance to make purchases from the Bookstore by way of the Financial Aid Office, (i.e.: Loans, Grants, Scholarships or VA), the BravesCard makes this possible.

BravesCards are made from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday. The BravesCard Office is located in the Auxiliary Services building near the Mail Room. The phone number is (910) 521-6845.

The following policies are in effect for the BravesCard:
1. In order for a student to obtain a BravesCard, proper government-issued photo identification (driver’s license, non-driver’s ID, military ID or passport) and a 9 digit student ID number is required.

2. BravesCards are the property of the University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

3. BravesCards are valid upon admission to the University; they are issued once, and are active upon a student’s enrollment for the current semester. BravesCards activate and deactivate according to enrollment status.

4. BravesCards are issued with names as they appear in the University’s Student Information System.

5. Updating a student’s name in the BravesCard system requires the change be reported to the Registrar’s Office prior any BravesCard re-issuance.

6. Lost or stolen BravesCards must be reported as soon as possible to the BravesCard Office.

7. A non-refundable, non-waiveable fee of $25.00 will be collected for lost, stolen or deliberately damaged BravesCards. BravesCards that are damaged due to normal wear and tear are replaced at no charge to the student.

8. Payment of a replacement fee constitutes authorization for deactivation and deletion of the missing ID card’s record from the University of North Carolina at Pembroke’s card database. Once that occurs, the old BravesCard can never be reactivated.

9. If a student withdraws from the university, their BravesCard must be returned to the BravesCard office.

10. Only Braves Dollars are refundable. They can be refunded upon graduation, withdrawal or at the end of each semester.

Braves Dollars

When BravesCards are issued, funds can be added to Braves Dollars in the Bursar’s Office, the BravesCard office and online via BraveWeb.  To add Braves Dollars with the BraveWeb option: Go to http://www.uncp.edu/ > Click on the Quick Links dropdown menu in the upper right corner > Scroll down to BraveWeb and click > Enter and submit login information > Scroll down to BraveDollars link and click > Enter desired amount in increments of ‘5’ and without the decimal (.) > Click Submit button > Click Submit button if details are correct > Enter card information > Click Continue button.  Funds are available for use within 15 minutes.

After adding Braves Dollars, they can be used in the Bookstore, Campus Mailroom, Printing Department, and the Hawk’s Nest Game Room. Braves Dollars can also be used in select vending locations for drinks, snacks, copying, printing, and to do laundry.

For more information about adding funds to the BravesCard, vending capabilities, meal plan options, Bonus Points, Braves Dollars and Dining Dollars, please visit the BravesCard website: http://www.uncp.edu/bs/card/.

Banking Access (24 hours)

A Cash Points bank machine provides 24-hour banking access. It is located next to the Chavis University Center (rear side). This machine is networked with American Express, Honor, Cirrus, Plus, Visa, MasterCard, and Discover.

Safety and Health Policy

Policy Statement

It is the policy of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, to provide a safe and healthful environment; free from recognized hazards, which may cause serious injury to students, employees, and visitors. This is accomplished by maintaining a comprehensive safety, health and environmental program, which involves all members of the University Community.  Our goals are to develop a safety consciousness among students, employees and others engaged in work for UNC Pembroke to reduce accidents, minimize potential liabilities and promote environmental stewardship. 

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke will conduct all of its activities in compliance with applicable environmental health standards, codes, regulations, and laws. Each and every person at the University understands that safety and health is not an additional job responsibility, but that 
it is an integral part of every task. If any function is not being performed safely, then it must be stopped, and then altered so that it can be performed safely.

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke believes that its most valuable resource is the people who teach, learn, and work at this institution, and will do all that is reasonable to protect them.

The primary purpose of the Campus Safety Office is to conduct safety inspections; identify and correct unsafe conditions; conduct safety training; provide consultative services to management on safety issues; prepare reports as required by state and federal agencies; investigate accidents to determine cause and take corrective action (risk management); and maintain a safe working and living environment for all students, employees and visitors.

 

University Police and Public Safety

The safety and security of students, faculty, and staff is a primary concern at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. All departments at the University engage in a continuing effort to keep our campus safe and secure. A truly safe campus can only be achieved through the cooperation of all members of the campus community.

The Police and Public Safety Department is a full-service law enforcement agency. UNCP Officers are trained professionals, certified by the North Carolina Justice and Standards Commission.  These Officers are vested with all powers of arrest within the University Community and all property owned or leased by UNC Pembroke and that portion of any public road or highway passing through campus or adjoining the campus. The Police and Public Safety Department has mutual aid agreements with all municipal departments within Robeson County including the Sheriff’s Department and NC Highway Patrol.

Motorist Assistance

Students, faculty, staff, and/or visitors on campus who find themselves in need of emergency vehicle service should call the University Police Department (521-6235) for assis­tance or contact the police via Emergency Call Boxes located on campus. Emergency supplies such as an air tank, jump boxes, gas can, a device for unlocking automobile doors.

Campus Escort Service

The University Police provide an escort service aimed at pedestrian safety on campus.  To obtain an escort, students, faculty and staff should dial 521-6235.

Emergency Call Boxes

The university police communications system allows the campus population the ability to contact officers directly 24 hours a day via telephone at 521-6235 or by activating an Emergency Call Box. There are fifty (50) Emergency Call Boxes located at various sites on campus and within residence halls. These call boxes are easily identifiable by the “Emergency” markings and outdoor boxes have a blue strobe lights mounted on top. To use these devices, a caller must depress the call button and the call box will connect to Police Dispatchers that are available to dispatch officers to calls for service 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

There are multiple avenues available for the University community to report a crime or request services. 

Phone: (910) 521-6235

In Person: The Police and Public Safety Department and Traffic Office are located in the Auxiliary Services building on Faculty Row behind the UNCP bookstore, directly across from the Oak Hall dormitory.

E-mail: police@uncp.edu

Anonymous and Confidential Online Form: www.uncp.edu/police/report_crime/form.htm

Parking and Vehicle Registration

Each motor vehicle, including two‑wheeled vehicles, driven or parked on campus by students, faculty, or staff must be registered with the Traffic Office and must display a valid parking permit. Fees are established annually and appropriate notification is provided.

North Carolina Senate Bill 627 requires all students to submit proof of motor vehicle insurance prior to purchasing a parking permit. In order to comply with this legislation, students must provide the following: 1) Name of Insurance Company; 2) Policy Number of Insured; and 3) Certification that the insurance meets the minimum needs established by North Carolina: $30,000 for bodily injury to one person, $60,000 for bodily injury to two persons or more, $25,000 for property damage.

All students, faculty, and staff members are subject to traffic rules and regulations. It is each individual’s responsibility to obtain a copy of the Traffic Rules and Regulations when registering a vehicle. These regulations are strictly enforced by the campus police. Fines must be paid before any records will be released from the University. Conviction of a violation of the traffic laws while operating a vehicle on campus has the same effect on your driver’s license as a conviction for the same offense on the public highways. The speed limit on campus is 20 mph and is enforced.

It is a privilege and not a right for a person to keep or operate a motor vehicle on campus. Each student, faculty, or staff member must agree to comply with the traffic rules and regulations before keeping or operating a vehicle at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. The University reserves the right to withdraw motor vehicle privileges from any person at any time.

All parking fines are due to be paid within fifteen (15) days of the issuance date, unless they are appealed within those fifteen days. If appealed, payment of assessments will not become due until notification of the Traffic Appeal Board to the person being assessed of its decision not to reverse the citation, at which time payment must be made within fifteen (15) days. Information regarding the Traffic Appeal Board is contained in the Traffic Rules and Regulations Handbook.

Reserved Parking

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke has set aside reserved parking spaces located throughout campus, in which Faculty/Staff only, may apply for when submitting a faculty/staff permit application.  These reserved spaces are issued on a yearly basis (August 31 until August 31 of the following year) and are issued on a first request, first issued basis.  The permits can be purchased at a cost of $350.00.

Any vehicle not properly registered for reserved parking areas will be subject to towing.

The Traffic Office can be reached weekdays at 910-521-6795, or contact the University Police at 910-521-6235.

Preferred Parking for Qualifying Low-Emitting (LEV), Fuel-Efficient (FEV) and Alternative Fuel Vehicles (AFVs)

To support UNCP’s sustainability goals and offer an incentive to reduce the campus’ carbon footprint, owners of qualifying LEV, FEV and AFVs will be allowed to park in specially marked spaces near the entrance of some buildings on campus.  This initiative will be introduced at the Health Sciences Building, a Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Silver certified building, and progress throughout campus starting with all parking lots associated with LEED certified buildings.

To park in one of these preferred spaces, a UNCP LEV decal is required.  There is no additional fee for the LEV decal, however, you must purchase or have already purchased a current UNCP parking permit.  Bring proof of vehicle registration, type of transmission (automatic or manual) and size of engine for your vehicle to verify qualification and receive your free LEV decal.  Parking in one of these spaces without the decal will result in a ticket.  To see if a vehicle qualifies, students and employees can visit the Sustainability Office’s website at:  http://www.uncp.edu/about-uncp/administration/departments/sustainability-office .  Electric vehicle charging stations will be incorporated into a percentage of these spaces as funding permits and demand increases.

For questions about this initiative, contact Jay Blauser, Sustainability Director, jay.blauser@uncp.edu or 910.521.6509.

Traffic Violations

Violations of traffic laws on the campus of the University (excluding parking violations) are violations of the motor vehicle laws of the State of North Carolina. All moving violations are processed through the state court system. After a citation has been issued, the matter is in the court system and cannot be resolved at the University. Conviction of a violation of the traffic law while operating a vehicle on the campus has the same effect on your driver’s license as a conviction for the same offense on the public highway. The speed limit on campus is 20 mph on all public streets and 10 mph in parking areas and is enforced.

Traffic Appeals Board

The Traffic Appeals Board is appointed each year by the Chancellor. The board consists of two students, one faculty and one staff member. The Board has the authority to review violations to determine whether or not a violation has been properly established. The Board has the authority to void or reduce any citation when a violation of the Campus Traffic Regulations is not shown, but does not act as a substitution for public authority when it applies.

Activities and Regulations

Student Handbook: Activities and Regulations

Click the following link to access that section of the Student Handbook:

University Calendar

The University Calendar is located on the web at https://calendar.uncp.edu. All public University events, meetings, dates, and deadlines are listed on the calendar. All students, faculty and staff can submit events on the Calendar by clicking the "Submit Event" link in the navigation bar.

E-nnouncements

E-nnouncments are sent to the student listserv twice weekly. Once at 9:00 a.m. Monday morning and once at 9:00 a.m. Thursday morning. If you want to submit items you can access additional E-nnouncements details (including the archives) and the E-nnouncments Submission Form at www.uncp.edu/leadership/listserv/.

Cultural Programs

There are many opportunities for cultural enrichment at UNCP. The University Theatre produces three main stage plays each year, plus numerous studio theatre productions. The Givens Performing Arts Center's Professional Artist Series, and On Stage for Youth Series provide ten to twelve professional touring groups each year. 

The Department of Music provides a significant number of programs throughout the academic year including the Moore Hall Recital Series, a UNCP Ensemble Series, as well as student and faculty recitals. The Moore Hall Series involves two to three programs each semester featuring solo artists, chamber groups, instrumental and vocal jazz ensembles, and even small operatic/musical theatre productions. The Musical Theatre program presents a variety of productions, from "scenes" to fully-staged musicals. The Ensemble Series involves an array of varied performances by the Concert Choir, Pembroke Singers, University Band, University Jazz Choir, "Spirit of the Carolinas" Marching Band, University Jazz Ensemble, UNCP Orchestra, Guitar Ensemble, etc. These ensembles are open to all students regardless of major.

Each year the Office of Multicultural and Minority Affairs sponsors "A Taste of Culture," a celebration of UNCP's cultural diversity. This is a program that consists of various displays presented by UNCP students, faculty, and staff which represents their respective cultural backgrounds. Displays often include food items to be sampled, hence the name "A Taste of Culture." Entertainment typically includes Native American dancers, African American dancers, Latin American dancers, Japanese dancers, singers, etc.

 

Last Lecture Series

The Last Lecture Series is a national event to honor Dr. Randy Pausch, author of the national best seller, The Last Lecture. Dr. Pausch was a Professor at Carnegie Mellon until he died of pancreatic cancer in 2008. The series is designed to recognize faculty members who teach with passion and enthusiasm. Award winners answer one question in the form of a highly engaging lecture: " If this were your last time to address a group of students, what would you say to them?"

This program is sponsored by the UNCP Student Government Association and the offices of Academic Affairs and Student Affairs.

Miss UNCP and Homecoming Court

The Miss UNCP Scholarship Pageant honors the personal commitment and talent of outstanding UNCP women in support of their continuing education.  Miss UNCP serves as an ambassador for the University campus and community, is a spokesperson for the Miss UNCP Scholarship Pageant, and represents the University at various functions on campus and in the community.  Miss UNCP is selected by a panel of judges.  Competition phases include private interview, on-stage question, casual wear, talent and evening gown.  A platform essay is also required.  Participants must be a full-time undergraduate or graduate student with 2.5 GPA.  Scholarship monies are awarded.

Selected each fall through a process that includes an application, a faculty and staff interview, and a vote of the student body, the Homecoming King and Queen represent the student body in the traditions of the University community.

Miss UNCP and the Homecoming Court represent the University at various functions, including parades and local pageants.

 

Publications

The INDIANHEAD is the annually published yearbook of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Its staff strives to provide an accurate account of the year's activities and events associated with student life at UNCP. All students are eligible to participate on the yearbook staff. Editors, assistant editors, and photographers are all salaried positions. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs has the administrative responsibility for overseeing the budget. A faculty advisor gives direction and support to the staff and offers technical assistance.

THE PINE NEEDLE is a bi-weekly student-published campus newspaper at UNCP. It records the weekly activities associated with the student body and the greater University community. Through its news, sports coverage, etc., THE PINE NEEDLE staff keeps the University community well-informed of what is happening at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke and also covers issues of regional and national concern. Through THE PINE NEEDLE students are afforded the opportunity to voice their opinions, thereby providing a vital communications link with the total University. All students are eligible to participate on the newspaper staff. Editors, assistant editors, advertising manager, and circulation manager are salaried positions. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs has the administrative responsibility for overseeing the budget. A faculty advisor gives direction and support to the staff and offers technical assistance.

THE AUROCHS is the annually student-published literary magazine of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. THE AUROCHS features original poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, photography, and artwork created and submitted by UNCP students. All students are eligible to participate on the staff of the literary magazine. Editors and assistant editors are salaried positions. The Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs has the administrative responsibility for overseeing the budget. A faculty advisor gives direction and support to the staff and offers technical assistance.

The STUDENT HANDBOOK is an annual online publication from the Student Affairs Office designed to familiarize the student body with the purpose of the University, the rules and regulations that govern the student body, and in general answers the many questions that students have.

Student Publications Board

The Student Publications Board, a subcommittee of the Faculty Senate committee on Student Affairs and Campus Life (SACL), establishes guidelines and provides policy which governs the newspaper, yearbook, and magazine. In addition, it has the responsibility for interviewing applicants and selecting editors for the campus newspaper, yearbook, and literary magazine.

Composition of the Student Publications Board includes: the Associate Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs (administrative advisor for the newspaper, yearbook, and literary magazine); the faculty advisor for the newspaper; the faculty advisor for the yearbook; the faculty advisor for the magazine; one faculty member not actively involved in student publications; the incumbent newspaper editor; the incumbent yearbook editor; the incumbent literary magazine editor; and the incumbent Student Government Association president or his/her designee.

Intercollegiate Athletics

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke excels in intercollegiate athletics in both men's and women's competition. UNC Pembroke is a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division II and the Peach Belt Conference, which includes 14 universities in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida and Alabama.

Eight men's sports and eight women's sports provide UNCP constant recognition at the local, regional and national levels. Men's varsity sports include baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, soccer, track & field, and wrestling. Women's sports are sponsored in basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track & field, and volleyball. Conference championships have been won in many of UNCP's programs and advancing to national competition has been an accomplishment of which the University is very proud. Since 2008 UNCP teams in Football, Softball, Soccer, Wrestling, Golf, Track & Field, and Cross Country have advanced to the NCAA playoffs.

As a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA), UNCP won over 60 district championships through the years and 30 league titles as a member of the Carolinas Conference from 1976-92. In 1978, the UNCP cross country team captured the coveted NAIA National Championship. Over 130 student-athletes have been honored as All-Americans in either the NAIA or NCAA. Also, former athletic greats are annually inducted into the UNC Pembroke Athletic Hall of Fame.

Athletic grants-in-aid are offered in all of the University's intercollegiate sports programs for both men and women upon recommendation of the head coach and approval of the Director of Athletics.

Intramurals and Campus Recreation

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke's Intramurals and Campus Recreation Department is committed to enhancing the student's classroom education by providing an environment which students can develop the leadership, social and interpersonal skills they will need throughout their years at the University and beyond. Through strategic programming the Campus Recreation staff will achieve these goals through equal opportunity in participation amongst men and women, student professional growth and health/wellness education. This department is associated with the Division of Student Affairs.

Intramurals is the biggest part of the Campus Recreation program. It offers opportunities for participation in over a dozen intramural activities including: flag football, softball, indoor and outdoor soccer and volleyball, basketball and many other smaller individual-based activities such as golf and tennis tournaments. Team off-campus travel is also made available in certain situations.

Club Sports are a constantly expanding segment of the Campus Recreation Department. Currently, there three sanctioned club sport activities: rugby, martial arts and tennis.

Outdoor Activities Program is a great way for students to explore their boundaries and their environment all at a greatly reduced rate. Current trips include: white water rafting on the Gauley River, snow skiing at Snow Shoe Mountain and deep sea fishing in the Gulf Stream.

Summer Recreation Program is a wellness-based seminar and educational series with multiple off campus excursions available. These activities are molded to introduce new life skills and activities for individual enjoyment and practice.

Co-Curricular Activities

The UNCP community believes that students should become actively involved in the co-curricular activities of the University. This involvement should be an important part of the student's campus life. The administration at UNCP is dedicated to providing the student body with a variety of activities that will complement the academic program.

Chamber Ensemble familiarizes students with representative literature for various small ensembles through rehearsal and performances. Examples of chamber ensembles include low brass ensemble, trumpet ensemble, saxophone quartet, clarinet ensemble, woodwind quintet, etc. Credit is available through the Music Department.

Cheerleaders are selected through competition. In addition to cheering at athletic events, the cheerleaders are campus leaders in promoting school spirit.

Concert Choir is open to all students regardless of planned major with permission of the director. The choir appears in public concerts throughout the year. Credit is available through the Music Department.

Indianhead is the University yearbook. All students are eligible to work on the staff. Credit is available through the Mass Communication Department.

Pembroke Singers is open to all students by audition. This ensemble will explore the stylistic, aesthetic, and technical elements of literature for the small choir through rehearsal and frequent public appearances. Credit is available through the Music Department.

Percussion Ensemble is open to all students by audition or permission of the director. Participation will include a technical, stylistic, and aesthetic study of percussion ensemble literature through rehearsal and public performances. Credit is available through the Music Department.

The Pine Needle is the student newspaper. All students are eligible to work on the staff. Credit is available through the Mass Communication Department.

University Concert Band is open to all students regardless of planned major with permission of the director. Public appearances are made in the form of several concerts each semester. Credit is available through the Music Department.

University Jazz Ensemble is open to all students by audition. Participation will include a study of technical, stylistic, and aesthetic study of percussion ensemble literature through rehearsal and public performances. Credit is available through the Music Department.

University Marching Band performs in the fall semester at area parades, marching contests, and on-campus events. Credit is available through the Music Department.

University Orchestra is open to all persons regardless of planned major with permission of the director. Students will study, rehearse, and perform music from world orchestra literature across a wide range of styles and genres. Credit is available through the Music Department.

University Pep Band is open to all students regardless of planned major with permission of director. Public performances will be made at athletic events (mostly basketball games). Credit is available through the Music Department.

The Aurochs is the student-published literary magazine, featuring the creative writing and artwork of UNCP students. All students are eligible to work on the staff. Credit is available through the English and Theatre Department.

University Theatre is a dramatics organization which offers members the opportunity to appear in plays and to engage in play production. All students are eligible.

WNCP-TV is a program service of the Department of Mass Communication and a learning laboratory for the televisual arts. Television programs are produced by UNCP students and faculty in classes or as part of departmentally approved extracurricular productions. These talk shows, newscasts, sports, special event coverage and other videos can be seen on channel 6 on Time Warner Cable in Robeson County (14,000 cable households). Select programs produced under the auspices of WNCP also air on channel 62 (WFPX-TV) and reaching at least 200,000 television households across six counties. Students earn progressively responsible positions at WNCP for credit or work-study.

New Student Organization Recognition

In order to ensure that a proposed organization is compatible with the University’s mission, and that it is in compliance with all federal, state, and University regulations, the University reserves the right to review and approve all proposed student organizations. Students who are interested in forming a new student organization must discuss their plans with the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership before having organization meetings, writing a constitution or planning activities. The Office of Student Involvement and Leadership will work with the student organization to identify existing student organizations that may meet students’ needs or help the students to develop the appropriate documentation to support successful completion of the recognition process. Students who wish to form a social Greek letter organization must meet these guidelines as well as those set by the Office of Greek Life.

Registered student organizations at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke must comply with University policies, including University policies on non-discrimination. The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is committed to equality of educational opportunity in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. As such:

  • Membership and participation in student organizations must be open to all students without regard to age, race, color, creed, national origin, disability, religion, religious status or historic religious affiliation, military veteran status, political affiliation or sexual orientation. Membership and participation in the group must also be open without regard to gender, unless exempt under Title IX.

  • Student organizations that select their members on the basis of commitment to a set of beliefs (e.g., religious or political beliefs) may limit membership and participation in the group to students who, upon individual inquiry, affirm that they support the group’s goals and agree with its beliefs, so long as no student is excluded from membership or participation on the basis of his or her age, race, color, national origin, disability, religious status or historic religious affiliation, military veteran status, sexual orientation, or, unless exempt under Title IX, gender.

To become a registered student organization at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, the following procedure must be followed: 

  1. Schedule a meeting with the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership to discuss the proposed organization and the registration process. Prior to meeting, make sure to consider the following questions:

          a.  Does a similar group already exist? Two groups working towards the same goal(s) can create a drain on membership and resources. Determine if merging with an existing group is a possibility.

          b.  What is the purpose? What is my group planning to do? If your organization is only looking to put on one event over the course of the year, it may be wise to consider collaborating or joining with an existing student organization. This may help on costs as well as the
               overall organization of your event/program.

          c.  Am I committed to this process? 
Starting a new organization is a significant commitment of time and energy. It requires ample motivation and dedication.

          d.  Do I have at least 10 students who will be active members for at least the first year? Remember, all student organizations are required to maintain a roster of at least ten (10) members to remain active. Recruiting new members regularly and cultivating leadership
               opportunities ensures the longevity of the group.

          e.  Is full-time faculty or staff member willing to be our advisor? All student organizations are required to have an advisor and all advisors must complete an advisor agreement outlining expectations. The advisor must be a member of the university faculty or
               administrative staff, employed full-time by UNC Pembroke, who volunteers to mentor student leaders and represent the University on behalf of a registered student organization. No more than two (2) organizations, including Greek organizations, may share the same advisor.

2.       Develop a constitution and bylaws for your organization.

3.       Establish a roster of at least ten (10) interested students.

4.       Identify a faculty/staff advisor who is employed full-time by UNC Pembroke.

5.       After meeting with the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership, you may now register your organization to be recognized. The steps do so will be covered in your meeting with the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership.

6.       Once registration information is submitted, the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership will review the roster, constitution/by-laws, and advisor agreement to ensure the minimum criteria/guidelines for establishing an organization have been met. If approved, your organization will need to set up another meeting to go over and logistical and/or officer training.

Checklist for Establishing a New Student Organization:

  • Interest meeting with the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership   
  • Complete BraveConnect Registration form to include:

         o   Primary student contact
         o   Roster: at least ten (10) members: names, bravemail, banner ID, and a phone number
         o   Advisor: full time UNCP Faculty/Staff member
         o   Constitution and Bylaws                                                                                      

  • Complete and submit the Advisor Agreement Form                                              

A few other things to keep in mind:

  • Once the organization registration is approved, the member(s) who submitted the application shall be notified. Remember: the approval process can take time, so plan accordingly if there is an event or program you wish to host or co-sponsor.
  • Within two (2) weeks after official approval of recognition, the organization will schedule organization training with Student Involvement and Leadership.
  • Until the student organization is officially recognized, activities of the organization will be limited to meetings and membership recruitment ONLY. No other activities will be permitted until final approval of recognition has been granted
  • Each time there is a change in advisor, officers, or general membership, the organization should update that information with Student Involvement and Leadership or Greek Life.

FundRaising Activities

Any student organization desiring to sponsor an on-campus fund-raising activity must submit a fund-raiser form through OrgSync. The reasoning for this is twofold: (1) conflicts will be avoided through efficient scheduling and (2) compliance with State and University statutes and regulations must be monitored.

Off-campus functions by student organizations will not be approved and/or supervised by the University. Student organizations are encouraged to schedule their functions, or any other form of fund-raiser, on campus. However, students and student organizations are reminded that they are subject to appropriate disciplinary action, including possible suspension or expulsion from the University, for breach of federal, state and local laws or University regulations. This principle extends to conduct off campus which is likely to have adverse effect on the educational process or which stamps the offender as an unfit associate for the other students. Students and student organizations are not entitled to greater immunities or privileges before the law than those enjoyed by other citizens generally.

Student Organizations

The Office of Student Involvement and Leadership supports student involvement and engagement. With over 90 recognized student organizations, students are sure to find one that’s right for them. Stop by OSIL to start a new organization or visit our website (www.uncp.edu/leadership) to see a current list of recognized student organizations. Below are descriptions
of the 8 different categories of recognized student organizations at UNCP.

Academic/Departmental organizations are centered within an academic department, professional program or have a national affiliation. Academic/Departmental organizations strive to increase involvement in departmental/program activities, increase faculty/student interaction and create close relationships with respective departments or disciplines of the UNCP community.

Diversity organizations strive to advance and promote a positive climate for diversity, to provide opportunities for students to interact with diverse populations, enhance the educational development of UNCP student in preparation for interaction within a diverse society.

Fraternity and Sorority (or Greek) organizations are those which subscribe to the policies of a national and/or international organization. Recognition is granted and maintained through the Office of Greek Life.

General Interest organizations provide an opportunity to plan and participate in a variety of programs that provide students with support, social interaction and entertainment outside of the classroom. General Interest organizations strive to meet the social expectations of the members of the organization and promote events regarding topics of interest that enhance student learning inside the classroom through practical application outside the classroom.

Honorary organizations have a national affiliation and recognize students who have excelled in a particular area. Honorary organizations strive to promote academic excellence among students pursuing a baccalaureate or graduate degree within a specific department or program at UNCP or a population of specific students.

Religious organizations serving the UNCP campus are based on the philosophy of pro­viding opportunities for spiritual enrichment, social activities, and religious service. They seek to integrate spiritual values, intellectual pursuits, and personal development.

Service organizations provide experiential learning opportunities for students in the area of community service and civic engagement and may have national affiliation. Service organizations strive to provide a wide variety of safe, well-planned volunteer and community service opportunities. In addition, they foster a lifelong commitment to civic engagement and provide opportunities for students to reflect on their community service experience.

Sports/Recreation organizations provide a broad and diversified opportunity of sports and recreation activities for students. Through participation students will be able to enhance their total well-being and engagement within the university community. Sports/Recreation organizations strive to help students develop leadership, financial, and organizational management skills through the opportunity to create, organize, and run their own organization.

Greek Life

All Greek Council (AGC)

All Greek Council consists of representation from all nineteen recognized organizations. The purpose of All Greek Council is to provide education and collaboration for the betterment of the fraternity and sorority community at UNC Pembroke. All Greek Council meets bi-weekly. Each organization is required to be represented at each meeting. Educational programming is consistent with the mission of the Office of Greek Life. All meetings are open to the public and all interested parties are encouraged to attend.

The following organizations are members of UNC Pembroke’s All Greek Council.

• Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.
• Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.
• Alpha Pi Omega Native American Sorority, Inc.
• Alpha Sigma Alpha Sorority
• Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc.
• Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.
• Kappa Delta Sorority
• Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc.
• Lambda Theta Phi Latin Fraternity, Inc.
• Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.
• Phi Delta Theta Fraternity
• Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity
• Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia 
• Phi Sigma Nu Native American Fraternity, Inc.
• Sigma Omicron Epsilon Native American Sorority, Inc.
• Sigma Sigma Sigma Sorority
• Theta Xi Fraternity
• Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.
• Zeta Tau Alpha Women’s Fraternity

Check the Office of Greek Life web site at www.uncp.edu/student-life/involvement-opportunities/greek-life/chapters for an updated list of organizations.

Recognized Governing Boards and Affiliate Organizations

National PanHellenic Council (NPHC)

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke National Panhellenic Council's (NPHC) purpose is to provide service to the campus and community, maintain unity, promote high standards of scholarship, and foster brotherhood and sisterhood. 

The council provides: a means for preserving the cultural heritage of the historically African American Fraternity/Sorority organizations; a forum for addressing items of mutual interest to the NPHC organizations; an experience of self-governance necessary for development of the emergent leader; and an opportunity to make recommendations to member organizations for the greater purpose and interest of the University and community.

Multicultural Greek Council (MCGC)

The purpose of the Multicultural Greek Council will be to set a high standard within the UNCP Greek community. This is accomplished by unifying fraternal organizations through leadership and communication as well as offering an alternative governing body in order to reflect the diversity of the UNCP student body. MCGC strives for academic excellence, community service, and educating the campus and community in regard to cultural awareness. MCGC is committed to making an impact at UNC Pembroke.

Hok Nosai

The purpose of this council is to promote and retain high standards in the campus life of Greek-letter organizations at UNCP; to promote unity and harmony between member organizations and amongst other Greek lettered organizations; to maintain a positive relationship with the administration; to address and develop strategies of action on matters of mutual concern to the member organizations; to facilitate active involvement of member organizations in the local community and on the campus; and, to promote a positive image of Greek life on the UNCP campus.

Panhellenic Council (PHC)

The purpose of the Panhellenic Council is to develop and maintain sorority life and sorority relations at a high level of accomplishment on campus.  PHC promotes superior scholarship, fosters inter-greek relationships, and high social and moral standards.  Each Panhellenic Council sorority acts in accordance with the rules established by the Panhellenic Council as to not violate the sovereignty, rights and privileges of the member organizations.  Each sorority supports several philanthropic projects each year.

Interfraternity Council (IFC)

The IFC is a self-governing body representing the fraternities at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Consisting of seven executive board members and the president/delegate of each fraternity, the IFC strives to promote excellence in all aspects of fraternity life and academic pursuits. The Council also works together to help the entire Greek community better achieve its common goal of membership development and service to the Greek community. The Council works to achieve these goals through its committee structure focusing on an array of areas including chapter development, scholarship, community service, member education, and alumni and public relations. The Council is lead by a seven member Executive Committee, which works closely with the Director of Greek Life. Each year, the Council sponsors numerous educational seminars covering a variety of topics pertinent to the lives of University students.

Joining a Fraternity or Sorority

In an effort to fully advance fraternal values at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, incoming freshmen will be eligible for the pursuit of fraternal membership beginning their first semester as a full-time student. Academic eligibility for first semester freshmen will be based on the student’s high school grade point average.  A student interested in fraternal membership must have a minimum 2.4 cumulative GPA and be enrolled at UNCP as a full-time student.

Please keep in mind that many Inter/National organizations require a minimum number of earned college credits, a competitive grade point average, involvement in organizations and community service, as well as a proven commitment to values and ideals associated with fraternities and sororities.

Maintaining a Fraternity or Sorority

In order to be in good standing with UNCP, each organization must meet the following minimum expectations.

  • Maintain a chapter grade point average of 2.4 or above for both semester and cumulative grades. Each organizations' grade point average (GPA) will be calculated by semester (fall and spring) per the membership roster provided to the Office of Greek Life. No summer grades will be calculated. The cumulative average will be used to determine eligibility for academic standing for the following semester. For a detailed explanation of academic probation and academic chapter review/suspension sanctions visit www.uncp.edu/student-life/involvement-opportunities/greek-life/forms-and-policies.
  • Attend and fully participate in All Greek Council and Governing Board meetings Chapters may not have more than one absence.
  • All chapters are required to maintain a chapter size at a minimum of 50% the size of the largest chapter in their council.
  • Attend and fully participate in Office of Greek Life Programs i.e. Songfest, New member Convocation, hazing prevention programs, etc.  Chapters must have 50% of the chapter membership in attendance. Chapters may not fall below 50% of members in attendance more than once per semester.
  • Each member must maintain full-time student status (12+ credit hours a semester)
  • Update chapter roster on a regular basis, which requires that changes be made within twenty-four hours of membership status changes.
  • Update grade release, bid card, anti-hazing agreement, and new membership documents within twenty-four hours of bid acceptance and/or beginning of the intake process.
  • Adherence to all University policies and procedures as well as all Inter/National and/or regional organization policies and procedures.
  • Update officer contact information each semester and/or immediately following officer changes.
  • Have an active faculty/staff advisor as well as an active off-campus advisor that adheres to the Office of Greek Life Advisor's policy. To view the advisor policy visit www.uncp.edu/student-life/clubs-recreation/greek-life/advising.
  • Schedule and attend chapter president one-on-one meetings with the Director of Greek Life or designee a minimum of twice per semester.
  • Must be in good standing with the Office of Student Conduct. Chapters placed on Conduct Probation by the Office of Student Conduct must have all events approved by the Office of Greek Life and the President of the organization must meet with the Director of Greek Life on a weekly basis.
  • Receive approval from the Office of Greek Life for the organization’s marketing. This includes, but is not limited to shirts, printed items (flyers, postcards, posters, etc.) electronic flyers, etc. Please submit all requests to whitney.swesey@uncp.edu and you will receive a response within 48 hours.
  • For a complete list of the Office of Greek Life policies and procedures visit the Greek Life website at www.uncp.edu/student-life/involvement-opportunities/greek-life/forms-and-policies.

The Director of Greek Life is responsible for monitoring the minimum expectations for each organization. If at any time an organization does not maintain the minimum requirements, the Director of Greek Life has the authority to sanction, including suspension for a period of time.

Establishing a Fraternity or Sorority

The UNC Pembroke Office of Greek Life welcomes the addition of fraternities and sororities by supporting open expansion and NPC extension. The following requirements must be met in order to establish a Greek organization on-campus.

  • The members of the fraternity/sorority as well as the headquarters of the Greek organization must hold a liability insurance policy with a minimum of one million dollars in coverage.
  • The fraternity/sorority must provide a copy of the organization's Inter/National policy as well as risk management policy (support of the Fraternal Information and Programming Group strongly encouraged).
  • The fraternity/sorority must adhere to NIC, NPC, NPHC, NALFO, and/or their governing body's standards when relevant as well as UNCP's Office of Greek Life policies and procedures.
  • The fraternity/sorority must provide a copy of a proposed constitution and bylaws.
  • The fraternity/sorority must have an active faculty/staff advisor as well as an active off-campus chapter advisor.
  • Organization must start with a minimum of six (6) members with no fewer than four (4) members having freshman, sophomore, or junior status.
  • A Certified copy of recruitment/intake plans must be submitted two weeks prior to the first interaction with potential members. This information must be signed and approved by the chapter advisor, state/province/regional director (when applicable), and approved by the Office of Greek Life.

Student Organization Risk Management Policy

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke requires that all student organizations recognized by the Office of Greek Life comply with the UNCP Code of Conduct and the following Risk Management Policy, as promulgated by Fraternity Insurance Protection Group, Inc. (FIPG, Inc.).

Any student organization found to have violated the Code of Conduct or any Greek letter organization found to have violated the Code of Conduct or the FIPG Risk Management policy will be subject to sanctioning through the University Judicial process. All incident reports will be forward to the Office of Student Conduct for review.

FIPG, Inc. Risk Management Policy

The Risk Management Policy of FIPG, Inc. includes the provisions which follow and shall apply to all fraternity/sorority entities and all levels of fraternity/sorority membership.

Alcohol and Drugs

1.  The possession, sale, use or consumption of ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES, while on chapter premises, during a fraternity/sorority event, in any situation sponsored or endorsed by the chapter, or in any event an observer would associate with the fraternity/sorority, must be in compliance with any and all applicable laws of the state, province, county, city and institution of higher education, and must comply with either the BYOB or Third Party Vendor Guidelines.
2.  No alcoholic beverage may be purchased through chapter funds nor may the purchase of same for members or guests be undertaken or coordinated by any member in the name of, or on behalf of, the chapter. The purchase or use of a bulk quantity or common sources of such alcoholic beverage, for example, kegs or cases, is prohibited.
3.  OPEN PARTIES, meaning those with unrestricted access by nonmembers of the fraternity/sorority, without specific invitation, where alcohol is present, shall be prohibited.
4.  No members, collectively or individually, shall purchase for, serve to, or sell alcoholic beverages to any minor (i.e., those under legal "drinking age").
5.  The possession, sale or use of any ILLEGAL DRUGS or CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES while on chapter premises or during a fraternity event or at any event that an observer would associate with the fraternity is strictly forbidden.
6.  No chapter may co-sponsor an event with an alcohol distributor, charitable organization or tavern (tavern defined as an establishment generating more than half of annual gross sales from alcohol) where alcohol is given away, sold, or otherwise provided to those present. This includes any event held in, at or on the property of a tavern as defined above for the purposes of fund-raising. A chapter may rent of use a room or area in a tavern as defined above for an event held within the provisions of this policy, including the use of third party vendor and guest list.
7.  No chapter may co-sponsor or co-finance or attend or participate in a function where alcohol is purchased by any of the host chapters, groups, or organizations.
8.  All recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter will be non-alcoholic. No recruitment or rush activities associated with any chapter may be held at or in conjunction with an alcohol distributor or tavern as defined in this policy.
9.  No member or pledge/associate/new member/novice shall permit, tolerate, encourage, or participate in "drinking games".
10. No alcohol shall be present at any pledge/associate/new member/novice program, activity or ritual of the chapter. This includes, but is not limited to activities associated with "bid night", "big brother - little brothers" events or activities, "big sister - little sister" events or activities, "family" events or activities and initiation.

Hazing

No chapter, colony, student or alumnus shall conduct or condone hazing activities. Permission or approval by a person being hazed is not defense. Hazing activities are defined as:

"Any action taken or situation created, intentionally, whether on or off fraternity premises, to produce mental or physical discomfort, embarrassment, harassment, or ridicule. Such activities may include but are not limited to the following: use of alcohol; paddling in any form; creation of excessive fatigue; physical and psychological shocks; quests, treasure hunts, scavenger hunts, road trips or any other such activities carried on outside or inside of the confines of the chapter house; wearing of public apparel which is conspicuous and not normally in good taste; engaging in public stunts and buffoonery; morally degrading or humiliating games and activities; and any other activities which are not consistent with academic achievement, fraternal law, ritual or policy or the regulations and policies of the educational institution, or applicable state law."

Sexual Abuse and Harassment

The fraternity/sorority will not tolerate or condone any form of sexist or sexually abusive behavior on the part of its members, whether physical, mental or emotional. This is to include any actions, activities or events, whether on chapter premises or an off-site location which are demeaning to women or men, such as verbal harassment. The fraternity/sorority will not tolerate sexual assault in any form.

Fire, Health and Safety

1.  All chapter houses should meet all local fire and health codes and standards.
2.  All chapters should have posted by common phones and in other locations emergency numbers for fire, police and ambulance and should have posted evacuation routes on the back of the door of each sleeping room.
3.  All chapters should comply with engineering recommendations as reported by the insurance company or municipal authorities.
4.  The possession and/or use of firearms or explosive or incendiary devices of any kind within the confines and premises of the chapter house are expressly forbidden.

Education

Each fraternity shall annually instruct its students and alumni/alumnae in the Risk Management Policy of FIPG, Inc. Additionally, all student and alumni members shall annually be sent a copy of said Risk Management Policy. A copy of said Risk Management Policy shall be available on the fraternity/sorority's Web site.

Rights and Responsibilities

Student Handbook: Rights and Responsibilities

Click the following link to access that section of the Student Handbook:

 


Student Rights and Responsibilities

1.1 Students attend the University of North Carolina at Pembroke as a voluntary act and accept substantial benefits which the State of North Carolina provides. In taking such action, and accepting the benefits which accrue, students must accept the rules and regulations that have been developed pursuant to law.

1.2 Upon enrollment, a student receives no sanctuary from obedience to law. A student is not entitled to greater immunities or privileges before the law than those enjoyed by other citizens generally. In addition to the federal, state, and local laws that pertain to all citizens, a student must accept the institutional rules and regulations necessary to accomplish the purposes for which the institution was established. The student does not, however, lose constitutional or legal rights by an act of voluntary enrollment. The University of North Carolina Policy Manual (700.4.1) specifically refers to the important right of a fair hearing and due process. Federal and state statutes and court cases have established certain student rights which are not to be infringed upon, except in situations which are themselves outlined in law and court procedures. Among these are:

1.2.a. no student may be denied access to university facilities or programs on the basis of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, disability, or because of the individual's honorable service in the armed services of the United States;

1.2.b. no student may be denied the protection of the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States and Article I of the Constitution of the State of North Carolina, which refer to freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom of the press, and freedom to assemble peacefully; and

1.2.c. no student may be denied the continuance of his/her education for disciplinary reasons without being afforded the right to due process.

2. ADDITIONAL RIGHTS RECOGNIZED BY UNCP

2.1 The right to read and study free from undue interference in one's room. (Unreasonable noise and other distractions inhibit the exercise of this right.)

2.2 The right to sleep, the right to one's personal belongings, the right to free access to one's room and suite facilities during the period that the residence halls are open, the right to a clean environment in which to live. (Optimum physical conditions are essential, as they support, reinforce, and provide positive conditions in which to learn and live.)

2.3 The right to redress of grievances. If the academic and residence hall communities are to function in the most educationally profitable manner, the right to initiate actions and referrals for impartial and fair adjudication of grievances is held paramount. In exercising this right, the student further holds the right to be free from fear or intimidation, physical and/or emotional harm, and without imposition of sanctions apart from the due process.

2.4 The right to personal privacy. All persons should have freedom from interference with their personal activities and should be able to maintain privacy for other than academic reasons.

2.5 The right to host guests. All students should have the opportunity to maintain personal contacts and friendships with other persons to fulfill their needs for socialization. Guests are to respect the above stated rights of the host's roommates and of other residents.


University Judicial System

Subject to any policies or regulations of the Board of Governors or the Board of Trustees, it shall be the duty of the Chancellor to exercise full authority in the regulation of student affairs and in matters of student discipline in the institution. In the discharge of this duty, delegation of such authority may be made by the Chancellor to faculty committees and to administrative or other officers of the institution, or to agencies of student government, in such a manner and to such extent as may by the Chancellor be deemed necessary and expedient. In the discharge of the Chancellor's duty with respect to the matters of student discipline, it shall be the duty of the Chancellor to secure to every student the right of due process and fair hearing, the presumption of innocence until found guilty, the right to know the evidence and to face witnesses testifying against the student, and the right to such advice and assistance in the individual's defense as may be allowable under the regulations of the University approved by the Chancellor. In those instances where the denial of any of these rights is alleged, it shall be the duty of the President of the University of North Carolina to review the proceedings.

Every student shall be bound by the Honor Code and the University Code of Conduct. The Honor Code shall prohibit academic dishonesty. The Code of Conduct shall prohibit actions and behaviors that are clearly inconsistent with the University's expectations for membership in this community. The University Code of Conduct is located at the following address:
www.uncp.edu/sa/handbook and is published in the Student Handbook, University Catalog and Faculty Handbook. All adjudicatory power of the Student Body shall be vested in a system of hearing boards with recognition that ultimate responsibility must conform to the By-Laws of the University as established by the Board of Trustees.


Academic Honor Code

1. STATEMENT OF PRINCIPLES

1.1 Academic honor and integrity are essential to the existence of a university community. If high standards of honesty are not maintained by everyone, the entire community and society itself suffer. Maintaining standards of academic honesty and integrity is ultimately the formal responsibility of the instructional faculty. Therefore, when any academic dishonesty is suspected, a faculty member has the responsibility to, and must, follow the policies and procedures of the UNCP Academic Honor Code.

1.2 Students are important members of the academic community. As responsible citizens of the UNCP community, students are obligated to uphold basic standards of honesty and to actively encourage others to respect and maintain those standards. Allowing academic dishonesty is just as dishonest as committing a dishonest act oneself.

2. ACTS THAT VIOLATE THE ACADEMIC HONOR CODE

2.1 While specific violations may take many forms, the general categories of acts that violate the Academic Honor Code are as follows:

2.1.a. Cheating. Cheating means intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, notes, study aids, or other devices in any academic exercise (for example, on a test). This definition includes both giving unauthorized information (in either oral or written form) and receiving such information during any academic exercise.

2.1.b. Plagiarism. Plagiarism is intentionally or knowingly presenting someone else's words or ideas as one's own. Avoid plagiarism by very carefully acknowledging the sources of ideas you use and by appropriately indicating any material that has been quoted (that is, by using quotation marks and properly acknowledging the source of the quote, usually with a clear reference source citation and page number).

2.1.c. Fabrication and Falsification. This refers to intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. Falsification is a matter of altering information, while fabrication is a matter of inventing or counterfeiting information for use in any academic exercise. For example, a student who changes an answer on a test and claims that the item was incorrectly scored has falsified information. A student who makes up reference citations for a term paper has fabricated that information.

2.1.d. Abuse of Academic Materials. This refers to intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing, or making inaccessible library or other academic material. Remember that library materials are borrowed, not to keep. For example, a student who tears an article out of a journal in the library has abused library materials. Similarly, a student who intentionally damages a computer in a campus computer lab has violated this standard.

2.1.e. Complicity in Academic Dishonesty. Complicity means intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another person to commit any act of academic dishonesty. For example, complicity would include allowing another student to look at test answers or to copy a paper. Simply stated, don't help someone else be dishonest.

3. PENALTIES FOR VIOLATIONS OF THE ACADEMIC HONOR CODE

3.1 The UNCP community takes the Academic Honor Code very seriously. Consequently, violations may lead to severe penalties. All acts of academic dishonesty violate standards essential to the existence of an academic community. Some first offenses are properly handled and penalties determined by the faculty member teaching the specific course in which they occur. The faculty member must use the settlement procedure described below to handle such an offense.

3.2 Penalties which individual faculty members may impose are limited to the following:

3.2.a. a formal warning or reprimand;

3.2.b. a reduced grade (including F) for the assignment; and

3.2.c. a reduced grade (including F) for the entire course.

3.2.1 In all cases, whatever the penalty, a signed Settlement of a Charge of Academic Dishonesty form will be kept for ten years in the Office for Student Affairs. The purpose of this record-keeping is to deter students from repeating offenses. A second purpose is to be sure students who violate the Academic Honor Code a second time are dealt with appropriately.

3.3 The Campus Judicial Board (CJB) handles all second offenses, some more serious first offenses, and any charges that the student feels are unfounded. In addition to any of the penalties available to an individual faculty member, the CJB may suspend the student from the university for a designated period of time (one semester, one year, etc.) or even dismiss the student from the university.

3.4 Several factors are considered in determining what penalty to impose for a violation of the Academic Honor Code. Those factors include:

3.4.a. the nature and seriousness of the offense;

3.4.b. the injury or damage resulting from the violation;

3.4.c. the student's motivation and state of mind at the time of the incident;

3.4.d. the student's prior disciplinary record; and

3.4.e. the student's attitude and behavior after the violation was committed.

4. PROCEDURES FOR HANDLING CHARGES OF VIOLATIONS

4.1 If the faculty member responsible for a course obtains evidence, either directly or through information supplied by others, that a student may have violated the Academic Honor Code, the faculty member has a duty to investigate the incident by collecting whatever relevant evidence is available.

4.2 If the faculty member decides that the evidence is sufficient to support a charge against the student, the faculty member is to contact the director of student conduct, who will determine from the records of past violations whether the student in question has previously admitted to, or been found guilty of, an Academic Honor Code violation.

4.3 If the suspected violation would be a second offense, the faculty member must take the case to the CJB. If the charge would be a first offense and the faculty member believes that a penalty no greater than F in the course would be appropriate, the charge may be settled between the faculty member and the student (as described below), with the settlement form signed and filed with the Office for Student Affairs. If the suspected violation would be a first offense, but one for which the faculty member considers the appropriate penalty to be more severe than F in the course, the case must be brought to the chairperson of the CJB.

4.4 Once a student has received notice that he or she is charged with an Academic Honor Code offense, he or she may not withdraw from the course in order to avoid the penalty.

5. SETTLEMENT PROCEDURE TO BE USED BY INDIVIDUAL FACULTY
MEMBERS

5.1 The faculty member should meet with the student suspected of violating the Academic Honor Code, present the evidence of the violation, and request an explanation from the student. After hearing the explanation, if the faculty member decides that a violation has occurred, he or she fills out and signs the Settlement of a Charge of Academic Dishonesty form, which is available to all faculty members. This form may be obtained from the Office of Student Affairs. The faculty member indicates the nature of the violation and the penalty to be applied, and then gives the form to the student. After receiving the form, the student has three (3) school days to consider and seek advice on whether to admit guilt and accept the penalty by signing the form.

5.2 If the student agrees to sign, admitting guilt and accepting the penalty proposed, he or she does so in the presence of the faculty member. The faculty member then imposes the penalty. The faculty member will send the signed settlement form to the director of student conduct, who keeps a record of first offenses for ten years, and thus the matter is ended. If the student decides not to admit guilt or not to accept the penalty, the faculty member must take the case to the chairperson of the Campus Judicial Board, if any penalty is to be imposed.

6. CAMPUS JUDICIAL BOARD

6.1 Composition of the CJB is as follows:

6.1.a. a minimum of five (5) students recommended by the president of the student body, and/or interested students may be recommended by university departments, or interested students may apply to the office of student conduct for selection for consideration by the chancellor. Students that are recommended and/or selected will be appointed by the chancellor;

6.1.b. a minimum of five (5) faculty members recommended by the faculty senate chairperson and appointed by the chancellor;

6.1.c. a minimum of two (2) administrative members recommended by the vice chancellor for student affairs and appointed by the chancellor.

6.2. Hearings follow procedures outlined in Chapter IV., Rights and Responsibilities. The CJB will judge the student as responsible or not responsible of the charges contained in the form submitted by the faculty member. Both the student who has been charged with a violation and the faculty member who has made the charge will give evidence to support their positions. Members of the CJB may question either the student or the faculty member or both and may ask for additional materials as they see fit to do so. In a closed session, the CJB will come to a conclusion about the validity of the charges.

6.3 If the student charged with a violation of the Academic Honor Code is found not responsible, the CJB prepares a written report of the case and sends it to the director of student conduct, who will maintain a confidential file of materials related to the case. No part of the file becomes part of the student's disciplinary record. The case is closed and no penalty may be imposed.

6.4 If a student is found responsible of violating the Academic Honor Code, the CJB will determine an appropriate penalty. Both the student and faculty member who submitted the charge may give evidence and make statements concerning the appropriate penalties to be imposed. The director of student conduct will supply the student's previous academic honor code disciplinary record (if any) to the CJB.

6.5 After hearing the evidence on the appropriate penalty, the CJB will determine the penalty, and prepare a written report to the student and the director of student conduct. The director of student conduct notifies the faculty member and the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs of the contents of that report. If the CJB decides that a penalty of a grade of F in the course (or one less severe) is appropriate, the faculty member imposes that penalty and no other penalty. If a more severe penalty is deemed appropriate, the director of student conduct implements the penalty indicated in the report. The student will be notified by the director of student conduct within five (5) days of the CJB's determination of penalty.

7. CAMPUS APPEAL BOARD

7.1 If the CJB has found a student responsible of violating the Academic Honor Code, the student has the right to appeal that decision. The student has five school days from the date he or she is notified of the CJB's decision to file a written notice of appeal with the director of student conduct. If the student does not file a notice of appeal, the decision of the CJB will be final.

7.2 If the student does file a notice of appeal within five days, the director of student conduct shall deliver this request as well as materials related to this case to the Campus Appeal Board.

7.3 The composition of the Campus Appeal Board and its powers are in Chapter IV., Rights and Responsibilities. For Academic Honor Code violations and their appeals, the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs (or his or her designee) will represent the vice chancellor for student affairs.

7.3.1 All charges for alleged Academic Honor Code violations occurring one week prior to exams and going through exam week and during summer sessions will be heard by the administrative hearing officer. Appeals will be directed solely to the provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs or his or her designee.

8. WHAT TO EXPECT FROM FACULTY

8.1 Faculty members have been instructed that they should outline their expectations pertaining to the Academic Honor Code at the beginning of each course. Students should be aware that some faculty members authorize or prohibit specific forms of student conduct which are unique to their courses or disciplines. All faculty members should refer students to the Academic Honor Code which is published in the UNCP Student Handbook. Further, faculty members have been advised to include the following statement in all course syllabi.

8.1.1. Student Academic Honor Code. Students have the responsibility to know and observe the UNCP Academic Honor Code. This code forbids cheating, plagiarism, abuse of academic materials, fabrication or falsification of information, and complicity in academic dishonesty. Any special requirements or permission regarding academic honesty in this course will be provided to students in writing at the beginning of the course, and are binding on the students. Academic evaluations in this course include a judgment that the student's work is free from academic dishonesty of any type; and grades in this course therefore should be and will be adversely affected by academic dishonesty. Students who violate the code can be dismissed from the university. The normal penalty for a first offense is an F in the course. Standards of academic honor will be enforced in this course. Students are expected to report cases of academic dishonesty to the instructor.

8.2 In general, faculty members should, and will, take preventive measures to avoid cases of academic dishonesty (for example, examinations should be carefully proctored). However, a faculty member's failure to take such measures is no excuse for academic dishonesty. Academic honesty and integrity, in the final analysis, are matters of personal honesty and individual integrity on the part of every student.


Student Conduct Disciplinary Process

 


Code of Conduct

1. CODE OF CONDUCT
1.1 Any student whose conduct on or off campus becomes unsatisfactory and is determined to have a detrimental impact on the mission of the university will be subject to appropriate action through the Office of Student Conduct. No student will be permitted to graduate or officially withdraw from the university while disciplinary action is pending against him or her. All students are responsible for conducting themselves in a manner that helps enhance an environment of learning in which the rights, dignity, worth, and freedom of each member of the academic community are respected. All students must report, in writing, any federal, state or local criminal charges and/or dispositions of criminal charges to the Office of Student Conduct.

1.2 According to the Bylaws of the Board of Trustees of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke (POL 01.05.01), ratified in March of 1968, the administration of the university is responsible for all phases of student discipline. The administration holds that a student enrolling in the university assumes an obligation to conduct himself/herself in a manner compatible with the university’s function as an educational institution. Further, the Board of Trustees has directed the administration to take appropriate disciplinary action against students and student organizations that are found to be in violation of the university’s Code of Conduct.

1.3 A UNCP student shall refrain from engaging in behaviors that violate the Code of Conduct listed below, which reflect conduct unbecoming of a student at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke.

2. VIOLATING THE ACADEMIC HONOR CODE
2.1 Cheating. Cheating means intentionally using or attempting to use unauthorized materials, information, notes, study aids or other devices in any academic exercise (for example, on a test). This definition includes both giving unauthorized information (in either oral or written form) and receiving such information during any academic exercise.

2.2 Plagiarism. Plagiarism is intentionally or knowingly presenting someone else’s words or ideas as one’s own. Avoid plagiarism by very carefully acknowledging the sources of ideas you use and by appropriately indicating any material that has been quoted (that is, by using quotation marks and properly acknowledging the source of the quote, usually with a clear reference source citation and page number).

2.3 Fabrication and falsification. This refers to intentional and unauthorized alteration or invention of any information or citation in an academic exercise. Falsification is a matter of altering information, while fabrication is a matter of inventing or counterfeiting information for use in any academic exercise. For example, a student who changes an answer on a test and claims that the item was incorrectly scored has falsified information. A student who makes up reference citations for a term paper has fabricated that information.

2.4 Abuse of academic materials. Intentionally or knowingly destroying, stealing, or making inaccessible library or other academic material. Remember that library materials are borrowed. For example, a student who tears an article out of a journal in the library has abused library materials. Similarly, a student who intentionally damages a computer in a campus computer lab has violated this standard.

2.5 Complicity in academic dishonesty. Complicity means intentionally or knowingly helping or attempting to help another person to commit any act of academic dishonesty. For example, complicity would include allowing another student to look at test answers or to copy a paper.

3. PROVIDING FALSE INFORMATION
3.1 Furnishing false information to the university with intent to deceive.

3.2 Withholding, with knowledge, information from the university.

4. FRAUD
4.1 Forging, altering, defrauding, or misusing documents, charge cards or money, checks, records, and ID cards of an individual or the university.

4.2 No student shall misrepresent himself/herself in, or with regard to, any transaction with the university, whether oral, written, or by other means.

5. FAILURE TO COMPLY WITH AN OFFICIAL REQUEST
5.1 Refusing to comply with any lawful order of a clearly identifiable university official acting in the performance of his/her duties in the enforcement of university policies (residence staff members are considered university officials when acting in an official capacity).

6. FAILURE TO PRESENT IDENTIFICATION
6.1 Failure to present his/her ID when requested to do so by a university official.

7. FAILURE TO DISCHARGE UNIVERSITY OBLIGATIONS
7.1 Neglecting to discharge all obligations to the university prior to the close of each semester.

8. COMPUTING APPROPRIATE USE POLICY
8.1 Violating the UNCP appropriate use policy for computers, networks, and federal copyright law (See Division of Information Technology Policy 01 03 Appropriate Use Policy.)

9. DISRUPTIVE AND DISORDERLY CONDUCT
9.1 No student shall engage in conduct that is disorderly, lewd, or indecent; breach of peace; or aid, abet, or procure another person to breach the peace on university premises or at functions sponsored by, or participated in, by the university or members of the academic community.

10. SETTING OF FIRE AND FIRE HAZARDS
10.1 No student shall start a fire or create a fire hazard on university-owned or operated property or properties off campus (willful damage to property by fire shall be prosecuted as arson when appropriate).

11. FIRE SAFETY EQUIPMENT
11.1 Misusing, tampering with, or disturbing without proper cause any fire prevention and control equipment.

12. CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR
12.1 Disrupting classroom activity and/or other university functions by operating cell phones, pagers, beepers, etc. in classrooms, libraries, and labs.

13. OBSTRUCTING OR DISRUPTING TEACHING, RESEARCH, OR OTHER
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES

13.1 Obstructing or disrupting teaching, research, or other university activities on university premises; the handling of disruptive behavior in the classroom is left to the discretion of the individual faculty member. However, it is suggested that the faculty member make clear to the class in the syllabus or at an early class meeting that any behaviors that disrupt the teaching and/or educational process will not be tolerated. If a student displays such behavior, the faculty member should deal with it early and directly by speaking to the student. If it continues to be a problem, the faculty member should ask the student to leave the classroom or speak with the student at the end of class and provide written documentation immediately to the department chair, dean, and associate vice chancellor for academic affairs. Additionally, a written summary statement should be mailed to the student before the next class meeting outlining the conditions under which the student may return to the class, if allowed to do so, or notifying the student that the faculty member, in consultation with the department chair and dean, is recommending to academic affairs that the student be administratively withdrawn from the class. The associate vice chancellor for academic affairs will ask the student for a written summary of class events. After reviewing materials submitted and conversation(s), the associate vice chancellor for academic affairs will make a determination concerning the request for an academic withdrawal. The decision of the associate vice chancellor is final.

14. THREATENING ANOTHER
14.1 By means other than the use or threatened use of physical force, harassing, or threatening another in a manner or through such behavior that a reasonable person would find threatening.

15. HARASSMENT
15.1 Harassing another student by using objectively offensive speech or behavior of a biased or prejudiced nature related to one’s race, color, creed, national origin, sex, religion, handicap, or age if such speech and/or behavior is so severe and pervasive as to effectively prevent the other student from obtaining an education or to create an objectively hostile educational environment.

16. ELECTRONIC DEVICES
16.1 Any unauthorized use of electronic or other devices to make an audio or video record of any person while on university premises without his/her prior knowledge, or without his/her effective consent when such a recording is likely to cause injury or distress. This includes, but is not limited to, surreptitiously taking pictures of another person in a gym locker room, or restroom.

17. ENDANGERING THE HEALTH AND/OR SAFETY OF ANY PERSON
17.1 No student shall take any action that creates a danger to any person’s health or safety or personal well being.

18. ASSAULT
18.1 No student shall cause physical harm or threaten to cause physical harm to another person. This includes, but is not limited to, any unwanted and unlawful touching or attempted unwanted and unlawful touching. Physical assaults may result in suspension from the university.

19. STALKING
19.1 The term “stalking” means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to:
19.1.a. fear for his or her safety or the safety of others; or,
19.1.b. suffer substantial emotional distress.

19.2 No student shall engage in conduct that may cause a person to fear for his/her safety due to a pattern of behavior that is unwanted and/or an emotional/mental disruption of his/her daily life. Such acts may include, but are not limited to, following another person, telephone calls, e-mail messages, meeting at classes or places of residence, and written and electronic notes or letters. An alleged violation of this policy will be charged as a “hate crime” under the Violence against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013.

20. DATING VIOLENCE
20.1 The term “dating violence” means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim; and where the existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on a consideration of the following factors:
20.1.a. the length of the relationship
20.1.b. the type of relationship
20.1.c. the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

20.2 No student shall engage in conduct which causes harm or may cause harm to a dating partner (as defined above). This includes, but is not limited to, any unwanted and unlawful touching or attempted unwanted and unlawful touching. An alleged violation of this policy will be charged as a “hate crime” under the Violence against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013.

21. DOMESTIC VIOLENCE
21.1 The term “domestic violence” includes:
21.1.a. felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim,
21.1.b. by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common,
21.1.c. by a person who is cohabiting with or has cohabited with the victim as a spouse,
21.1.d. by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or,
21.1.e. by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family domestic violence laws of the jurisdiction.

21.2 No student shall engage in conduct which causes harm or may cause harm to a domestic partner (as defined above). This includes, but is not limited to, any unwanted and unlawful touching or attempted unwanted and unlawful touching. An alleged violation of this policy will be charged as a “hate crime” under the Violence against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013.

22. UNAUTHORIZED ENTRY/TRESPASSING
22.1 Unauthorized entry or presence in or upon or use of any university premises or property including, but not limited to, roofs, storage facilities, crawl spaces, mechanical rooms, and out buildings or student property (i.e., automobiles, lockers, or residences) or unauthorized possession, duplication, loan, or use of keys to any university premises or property.

23. OFFENSIVE OR DISRUPTIVE SPEECH/CONDUCT
23.1 Engaging in objectively offensive or disruptive speech or conduct directed toward a member of or visitor to the university community if such language or conduct is obscene or so severe and pervasive as to constitute legally prohibited harassment in that it effectively prevents an individual from obtaining an education or creates an objectively hostile educational work environment.

24. ABUSE OF STUDENT CONDUCT SYSTEM
24.1. Failure to obey the notice from a Campus Judicial Board or university official to appear for a meeting or hearing as part of the student conduct system.

24.2. Falsification, distortion, or misrepresentation of information before a Campus Judicial Board or university hearing official.

24.3. Disruption or interference with the orderly conduct of a Campus Judicial Board or administrative hearing proceeding.

24.4. Institution of a student conduct code proceeding in bad faith.

24.5. Attempting to discourage an individual’s proper participation in, or use of, the student conduct system.

24.6. Attempting to influence the impartiality of a member of a Campus Judicial Board or administrative hearing officer prior to, and/or during the course of, the Campus Judicial Board or administrative hearing proceeding.

24.7. Harassment (verbal or physical) and/or intimidation of a member of a Campus Judicial Board or administrative hearing officer prior to, during, and/or after a student conduct code proceeding.

24.8. Failure to comply with the sanction(s) imposed under the student code.

24.9. Influencing or attempting to influence another person to commit an abuse of the student conduct code system.

25. VIOLATING POLICIES GOVERNING RESIDENCE LIFE
25.1 See Housing Contract and Student Housing Section VIII. of the Student Handbook.

26. BICYCLES, SKATES, SKATEBOARDS, AND SCOOTERS
26.1. Roller skating/blading, skateboarding, scooter riding, and the riding of bicycles is prohibited in university buildings.

26.2. Roller skating/blading, skateboarding, scooter and bicycle riding as a means of transportation is only permitted on walkways and ramps when the operator does not create a hazard to themselves or others.

26.3. Performing jumps or other stunts (“hot-dogging”) is strictly prohibited on campus.

26.4. Roller skating/blading and skateboarding by visitors is prohibited.

26.5. Skateboarders and roller skaters/bladers may not be towed by bicycles or other vehicles.

27. VANDALISM AND DAMAGE TO PROPERTY
27.1 Vandalizing, destroying maliciously, damaging, or misusing public or private properties, including library materials.

28. LITTERING
28.1 All litter must be placed in a proper receptacle. No individual may scatter, spill, or place or cause to be blown, scattered, spilled, or placed or otherwise dispose of any litter upon any public or private property.

29. STEALING OR ATTEMPTING TO STEAL
29.1 Stealing or attempting to steal, aiding or abetting, receiving stolen property, selling stolen property, or embezzling the property of another person or the university.

30. ALCOHOL AND DRUGS
30.1. Being intoxicated in public, displaying, driving under the influence, illegally possessing or using alcoholic beverages or liquors, or providing alcohol to students under legal age, found visibly overcome by alcohol, driving while under the influence of alcohol.

30.2. Participation in behaviors/games/devices which are consistent with rapid consumption, including, but not limited to, beer funnels/bongs, keg stands, shot-gunning/chugging, Flip Cup, Circle of Death, Beer Pong, or Quarters.

30.3. Kegs are not permitted on campus. Students may not possess kegs, or any other common source containers of alcohol such as “party balls” or use any item such as a bathtub, trash can, or similar container to hold alcohol.

30.4. Illegally manufacturing, selling, using, or possessing narcotics, barbiturates, amphetamines, marijuana, sedatives, tranquilizers, hallucinogens, and/or other known drugs and/or chemicals.

30.5. Buying, selling, possessing, or using any kind of drug paraphernalia or counterfeit drugs (see The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Illegal Drug and Alcohol Policy in the Student Handbook Section V. Administrative Policy).

31. HAZING
31.1 Participating in hazing or illegal harassment of UNCP students (see Student Handbook Section V. Administrative Policies).

32. WEAPONS, EXPLOSIVES, AND DANGEROUS CHEMICALS
32.1 No student shall possess or use firearms, explosive devices, or weapons of any kind on university property or at an event sponsored or supervised by the university or any recognized university organization. Such weapons may include, but are not limited to, guns, BB guns, air pistols, rifles, knives, martial art devices, and bows.

33. SEXUAL HARASSMENT
33.1 Sexual harassment of any member of the university community (See Sexual Harassment Policy in Student Handbook Section V. Administrative Policies).

34. SEXUAL ASSAULT
34.1 Any sexual act that occurs without the consent of the victim, or that occurs when the victim is unable to give consent (see Student Handbook Section V. Administrative Policies).

35. SEXUAL MISCONDUCT
35.1 Any attempted or actual act of non-consensual or forcible sexual touching including, but not limited to, fondling, kissing, groping, attempted intercourse (whether oral, anal or genital), or attempted penetration with a digit or any other object.

36. SEXUAL EXPLOITATION
36.1 Taking non-consensual, unjust, or abusive sexual advantage of another for one’s own advantage or benefit or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited, and that behavior does not otherwise constitute rape, sexual assault, or sexual harassment. Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to, prostituting another student, non-consensual video or audio taping of sexual activity, going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as letting friends surreptitiously watch you have consensual sex, or unauthorized distribution of photos or other materials of a sexual nature), engaging in voyeurism, and inducing incapacitation with the intent to rape or sexually assault another person or with the intent to create opportunity for a third party to rape or sexually assault another person.

37. OTHER SEXUAL OFFENSES
37.1 Obscene or indecent behavior, which includes, but is not limited to, exposure of one’s sexual organs or the display of sexual behavior that would reasonably be offensive to others.

38. HATE CRIMES
38.1 No student shall threaten, coerce, harass, or intimidate another person or identifiable group of persons in a manner that is unlawful or in violation of a constitutionally valid university policy while on university premises or at university sponsored activities based upon the person’s race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual orientation, gender-identity, creed, disability, or veteran status (The UNC Policy Manual 700.4.2) dating violence, domestic violence or stalking (Violence against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013).

38.2 No student shall engage in unlawful harassment leading to a hostile environment. Unlawful harassment includes conduct that creates a hostile environment by meeting the following criteria:

38.2.a. directed toward a particular person or persons;
38.2.b. based upon the person’s race, color, religion, national origin, gender, sexual
orientation, gender-identity, creed, disability, or veteran status;
38.2.c. unwelcome;
38.2.d. severe or pervasive;
38.2.e. objectively offensive; and
38.2.f. so unreasonably interferes with the target person’s employment, academic
pursuits, or participation in university-sponsored activities as to effectively deny
equal access to the university’s resources and opportunities.

39. GAMBLING
39.1 Gambling is prohibited on university property.

40. UNIVERSITY POLICIES
40.1 No student shall take any action, which violates any published university policies or procedures. This includes the violation of any university published policy, rule, or regulation in hard copy or available electronically on the university website.

41. FREE SPEECH
41.1 The university embraces and strives to uphold the freedoms of expression and speech guaranteed by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the North Carolina Constitution. The university has the right under appropriate circumstances to regulate the time, place, and manner of exercising these and other constitutionally protected rights (The UNC Policy Manual 700.4.2).

42. KNOWINGLY ACTING AS AN ACCESSORY TO ANY CHARGES
42.1 Any act that assists another in violating any university policy or regulation.

42.2. Being present while the offense is committed and advising, instigating, or encouraging the act.

42.3. Facilitating in the committing of an offense in any way.

43. RESPONSIBILITY FOR GUESTS
43.1 Any violation of the Code of Conduct by one’s non-University of North Carolina at Pembroke guest. “Guest” is defined as any non-student present on university premises at the invitation and/or hosting of a UNCP student.

44. VIOLATION OF FEDERAL, STATE, OR LOCAL LAW
44.1 Any act committed by a student on or off campus that is a violation of federal, state, or local law.

45. STUDENT ORGANIZATION BEHAVIOR
45.1 Any student organization found to have violated the Code of Conduct or any Greek letter organization found to have violated the Code of Conduct or the Fraternal Information & Programming Group (FIPG) Risk Management Policy will be subject to sanctioning through the university judicial process.


Disciplinary Sanctions

1. COMMON DISCIPLINARY SANCTIONS

1.1 The aim of all discipline is two-fold: first, to develop self-control in the individual, and second, to protect the welfare of society. The emphasis is on rehabilitation and re-education.

1.2 WARNING–Technically, this is not considered a discipline, per se; however, it may be used in cases where no actual disciplinary action seems called for. The warning may be verbal or written. If verbal, a notation of the incident is made on the student's or organization's record in the office of the vice chancellor who gave or approved the warning. If written, an official letter is sent to the student or organization, outlining the actions which brought him/her to the attention of the University, cautioning him/her about the possible consequences of such actions, and warning him/her about the possible consequences of any continuation of such actions.

1.3 ADMONITION–The student is given a corrective interview. In addition, a notation of the incident is made on the student's record in the office of the vice chancellor who gave or approved the admonition.

1.4 REPRIMAND–An official letter is sent to the student indicating his/her misdeed, stating that such conduct is unacceptable, that further misconduct will probably result in more severe disciplinary action, and concluding with the hope that his/her conduct in the future will be above reproach.

1.5 CENSURE–Censure is the same as a reprimand except that it is used for organizations, organization leaders, et cetera, as distinguished from individuals. A copy is sent to that organization's sponsor to apprise him/her of the unsatisfactory situation.

1.6 RESTITUTION–Appropriate monetary reimbursement for a wrongful act which resulted in loss, damage, or actual expenses incurred by the University or individuals.

1.7 AREA RESTRICTIONS–Occur when a student may be excluded for a specific time period from a facility, such as the gym, the University Center, the residence halls, or other areas on campus.

1.8 LOW ON-CAMPUS HOUSING PRIORITY–Defined as removing a student from his/her place in the housing assignment process and placing him/her at the very end of the waiting list for on-campus housing for the upcoming year. If a student has already received an assignment, the student will not be allowed to retain that assignment.

1.9 EXCLUSION FROM ON-CAMPUS RESIDENCY–Defined as removing the student's privilege to apply for and/or live in a residential facility for a specified period of time. This sanction should be imposed if the offense(s) for which the student was found responsible merits the student's exclusion from on-campus residency. This decision would be based on evidence that the student's continued presence would interfere with the living/learning atmosphere within the residential community.

1.10 RESIDENCE FACILITY RELOCATION–Removal of a student from his/her present room or from that residence facility and assigning that student to another room or another residence facility. This would include considerations relative to housing options.

1.11 EVICTION FROM AN ON-CAMPUS RESIDENTIAL FACILITY–Removal of a resident from an on-campus residence for a specified period of time. Students who are evicted from an on-campus residential facility are prohibited from returning to or visiting in any on-campus residential facility. Students evicted will not be eligible for refund of unused room or board.

1.12 CONDUCT PROBATION–The student continues in attendance; however, (s)he is in danger of suspension for any breach of good conduct during the period of conduct probation. Further (s)he may not hold any general elective office while on conduct probation. A copy of the probation letter is placed in his/her file in the office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.

1.13 SOCIAL PROBATION–The student continues in attendance; however, (s)he is restricted from all social functions and is in danger of suspension for any breach of good conduct during the period of social probation. Further, (s)he may not hold any general elective office while on social probation. A copy of the probation letter is placed in his/her file in the Student Affairs Office.

1.14 COMMUNITY WORK/SERVICE–Community work/service assigned to a student shall commence within one week and shall be completed within 40 days of the penalty. The maximum number of voluntary work hours that may be assigned is 75. The community work/service must be supervised by a UNCP employee and it should be case or offense related.

1.15 SUSPENSION–The student is excluded from the University, both academically and socially, for a stated period. The student may request to be readmitted at the end of this period of suspension; however, readmission is never automatic. A copy of the suspension letter is placed in his/her file in the Student Affairs Office.

1.16 INTERIM SUSPENSION–Whenever there is evidence to suspect that a student's behavior on or off campus is a clear and present threat to the health, safety and welfare of the faculty, staff, students or guests, or himself/herself, the student may be suspended on an interim basis until a campus hearing can be arranged. A student on an interim suspension may be restricted from the campus in its entirety or from a particular program, activity or building.

1.17 SUMMARY SUSPENSION–Please see section IV, Rights and Responsibilities, Initiation of Disciplinary Procedures, part 17. Committee on Extraordinary Disciplinary Emergencies and 17.5., Summary Suspension, for a detailed description of this disciplinary sanction.

1.18 DISMISSAL–The student is excluded from the University, both academically and socially, for an indefinite period. The student may petition the University for readmission; however, readmission is never automatic. No petition will be considered for readmission prior to the end of a year's time. A copy of the dismissal letter is placed in his/her file in the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs.

1.19 EXPULSION–A The Campus Judicial Board or Administrative Hearing Officer will make a recommendation for expulsion, and the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs will review the recommendation, and will provide a statement of assent or dissent to accompany the recommendation to the Chancellor of the University to permanently separate the student from the University. The Chancellor must review and make the final decision on any expulsion penalty for disciplinary reasons. When a recommendation of expulsion is made to the chancellor by the Campus Judicial Board or the Administrative Hearing Officer an additional sanction of immediate Interim Suspension will be imposed. A student who is expelled will be unable to graduate from The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Please see the Expulsion Policy in Section IV - Rights and Responsibilities.


Appeals

Any disciplinary action may be appealed. Further information may be found in Section IV. Rights and Responsibilities, Student Conduct Disciplinary procedures. More information concerning the appeal process for expulsion cases can be found on the official UNCP Policy and Regulation website, www.uncp.edu/policies.


Student Discipline Records

The University maintains for every student who has received any discipline sanctions a written discipline record. The file shall include the nature of the offense, the penalty assessed, and any other pertinent information.

Student Conduct discipline files are housed in the Office of Student Affairs for eight years and are then forwarded to the Registrar's Office unless the sanction is suspension or expulsion. Suspension and expulsion files are kept in the Student Affairs Office indefinitely. Students suspended or expelled for disciplinary infractions will be entered into the Suspension/Expulsion database at UNC General Administration and will be available to all UNC campuses.

Academic Honor Code violations resulting in conviction will be kept in the Student Affairs Office for ten years. Pertinent information involving these cases will be transferred to the Registrar's Office immediately after verdict.

Student discipline records are confidential in accordance with federal and state laws. The contents of the student's discipline record may not be revealed to anyone not associated with campus discipline except upon written request of the student or a court-ordered subpoena.


Responsibility to Report Criminal Violations and/or Dispositions

During your period of enrollment at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, should you be subject to any criminal charge and/or any disposition of a criminal charge, on or off campus, you must within two (2) business days notify the Office of Student Conduct in writing regarding the nature of the charge/offense and the disposition of the charge if applicable. You do not have to notify the Office of Student Conduct regarding traffic-related misdemeanors unless the traffic-related misdemeanor involves alcohol or drugs. (e.g. you are not required to report a speeding ticket, but you are required to report a Driving Under the Influence (DUI) ticket or Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) ticket.) Your failure to do so will be grounds to deny or withdraw your admission, or to dismiss you after enrollment.

All students must notify the Office of the Registrar in writing within two (2) business days of any criminal charge, any disposition of a criminal charge, on or off campus, or any school, college, or university disciplinary action against you, or any type of military discharge other than a honorable discharge that occurs at any time after you are accepted at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke (this includes that occur on or off campus and incidents during summer months and other breaks). Your failure to do so will be grounds to deny or withdraw your admission, or to dismiss you after enrollment.

Administrative Policies

Click the following link to access that section of the Student Handbook:

 


Student Involvement in University Policy

The University's administration strongly encourages student participation policy-making decisions that affect students and the University. Student representation exists on the following subcommittees and boards in addition to various committees that are appointed by the Student Senate and/or the Student Government Association President:


The UNCP Drug and Alcohol Policy

1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 This policy is adopted by the Board of Trustees of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke in conformity with the direction of the Board of Governors of The University of North Carolina. It is applicable to all students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees. This policy is also intended to comply with the requirements of the Drug-Free Schools and Campuses regulations of the U.S. Department of Education.

1.2 The University of North Carolina at Pembroke (the “university” or “UNCP”) is dedicated to providing a work, study, and recreational environment that does not include illegal drugs, abuse of prescription medications, or excessive use of alcohol. All students, staff, faculty, and guests are viewed by the university as individually responsible and legally accountable for their actions. The illegal possession, sale or use of drugs, including alcohol, adversely affects the academic community. Toward that end, the university notifies in writing, the parents of students under the age of 21 of such offenses.

1.3 In addition, students should be aware that the UNCP Student Code of Conduct extends to any student whose conduct on or off campus becomes unsatisfactory and is determined to have a detrimental impact on the mission of the university. Students whose behavior off campus requires the involvement of law enforcement or other authorities may be subject to appropriate judicial sanctions from the university. This behavior includes being intoxicated in public, displaying alcohol, driving under the influence, or illegally possessing or using alcohol, or providing alcohol to students under the legal age. Manufacturing, selling, using, or possessing narcotics, barbiturates, amphetamines, marijuana, sedatives, tranquilizers, hallucinogens, and/or other known drugs, and/or chemicals is included in this code, as is buying, selling, possessing, or using any kind of drug paraphernalia or counterfeit drugs.

1.4 The university has developed drug education, prevention, and intervention programs. Members of the university community are encouraged to become familiar with the programs and are invited to take advantage of the services provided.

1.5 The chancellor has designated the Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) as the coordinating agency of drug education. With that designation, the CAPS is the office, under the supervision of the director, responsible for overseeing all programs and changes related to this policy.

2. ALCOHOL/DRUG EDUCATION PROGRAMS
2.1 The university has established and maintains a program of education designed to help all members of the university community avoid involvement with illegal drugs. This educational program emphasizes these subjects:

2.1.a. the incompatibility of the use or sale of illegal drugs with the goals of the university;
2.1.b. the legal consequences of involvement with illegal drugs;
2.1.c. the medical implications of the use of illegal drugs; and,
2.1.d. the ways in which illegal drugs jeopardize an individual’s present accomplishments and future opportunities.

2.2 Committee on Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP)
2.2.1 The CSAP is a comprehensive and interdisciplinary team of campus and community professionals as well as students that provides informed guidance and advises the university community with coordinated drug-related education, prevention, and intervention services. The term “drugs” includes both legal drugs (i.e., alcohol, prescription medications, over-the-counter medications, nicotine, caffeine, etc.) and illegal drugs as covered by the Controlled Substance Act. CSAP defines itself as an advisory board for the prevention, intervention, and education policies and activities concerning the use and/or abuse of tobacco, alcohol, and other drugs. A staff member of the Counseling and Psychological Services serves as chairperson of CSAP. CSAP activities encourage individuals to:

2.2.1.a. value and maintain sound health;
2.2.1.b. respect state/federal laws and university regulations;
2.2.1.c. recognize and resist pressure to use drugs;
2.2.1.d. promote drug-free activities;
2.2.1.e. promote the use of rehabilitation resources; and,
2.2.1.f. recognize the incompatibility of drug abuse and achievement of personal goals.

2.3 Educational Activities and Counseling Services
2.3.1. Division of Student Affairs provides the following:

2.3.1.a. annual notification to all enrolled students of the consequences of drug use and/ or abuse;
2.3.1.b. administration of an annual, anonymous, freshman wellness survey;
2.3.1.c. educational programs in a variety of formats;
2.3.1.d. a multimedia library on drug related topics;
2.3.1.e. alternative programming promoting drug-free fun;
2.3.1.f. Living/Learning programs in the residence halls;
2.3.1.g. observance of National Collegiate Alcohol Awareness Week;
2.3.1.h. peer-educators to encourage informed choices concerning alcohol consumption and to discourage the use of illegal drugs;
2.3.1.i. twelve-step meeting schedules, e.g., AA, NA, etc;
2.3.1.j. referral information for students;
2.3.1.k. drug assessment and/or counseling for students;
2.3.1.l. support groups and drug awareness workshops; and
2.3.1.m. drug education and assessment for student violators of this drug policy.

2.3.2 Division of Academic Affairs provides the following:

2.3.2.a. alcohol/drug modules in all freshman seminar classes;
2.3.2.b. academic credit courses in drug abuse prevention and chemical dependency;
2.3.2.c. academic credit courses in wellness and fitness; and
2.3.2.d. a wellness committee to promote healthy choices.

2.3.3 Division of Business Affairs provides the following:

2.3.3.a. an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) which includes consultation,
assessment, and referral; and,
2.3.3.b. annual written notification of all employees of this drug policy, the consequences of drug use/abuse, and available resources, including EAP, for counseling and rehabilitation.

3. INSTITUTIONAL POLICY ON DRUGS AND ALCOHOL
3.1 Individuals who suspect they may have a drug or alcohol problem are encouraged to seek help through the CAPS or EAP before the problem affects their academic performance, work performance, or conduct. Anyone reporting to class/work under the influence of alcohol or illegal drugs or using alcohol or illegal drugs on the job may be suspended or dismissed without warning. In addition to disciplinary action by the university, violation of the university’s drug-free policy may be cause for criminal prosecution by government or law enforcement agencies.

3.2 The illegal possession, sale, or use of drugs, including alcohol, will not be tolerated at the university. Violation will result in sanctions which may include dismissal from employment and the termination of student status (suspension or expulsion). The university may impose sanctions if it is proven by a preponderance of evidence that a violation has occurred. Students, faculty and staff are subject to federal, state, and local laws as well as university rules and regulations. Members of the university community are not entitled to greater immunities or privileges before the law than those enjoyed by other citizens generally. Although the university reserves the right to impose more severe sanctions for any violation of its Drug and Alcohol Policy as circumstances may warrant, the minimum penalties that may be imposed for particular offenses are set out herein below.

3.3 Alcohol Possession and/or Consumption Regulations for UNCP Students and Employees.

3.3.1 Programs exist on campus to assist persons of legal age in making informed choices concerning alcohol.

3.3.2 Students of legal age are permitted to possess and consume beer, unfortified wine,
fortified wine, spirituous liquor, and mixed beverages only within the confines of their residence hall rooms. Caffeinated Alcoholic Beverages (CABs; i.e., Four Loko, MoonShot, Joose) are prohibited on campus.

3.3.3 Students aged 21 years and older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol while tailgating in designated areas or parking lots prior to UNCP football games.

3.3.4 Student possession and/or consumption of any alcoholic beverage is prohibited at any location except as indicated in section 3.3.2 and 3.3.3 of this drug policy.

3.3.5 Student fees cannot be used to purchase alcohol.

3.3.6 Kegs are not permitted on campus. Students are not to possess kegs, or any common source containers of alcohol such as “party balls,” or use any item such as bathtubs, trash cans, or similar container to hold alcohol. Beer funnels or other alcohol paraphernalia used for rapid consumption are not permitted anywhere on campus. Students are not allowed to construct or own a table used for the purpose of beer pong on campus. Kegs or any other rapid alcohol consumption paraphernalia brought onto campus will be seized as contraband by campus police and the contents destroyed. Kegs may be retrieved with proof of ownership when the student is prepared to remove them from campus. The chancellor of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke reserves the right to approve the use of alcoholic beverages (including kegs of beer) at special functions, provided appropriate permits are obtained from the North Carolina Alcoholic Beverage Control Commission.

3.3.7 In an effort to create sanctions for the violations to the university alcohol and drug policy that reflect UNCP’s commitment to reduce underage and high-risk drinking and adherence to N.C. General Statute § 18B-302, the following will be enforced on a case-by-case basis. Minimum sanctions against students for underage consumption or possession/public display of alcohol:

3.3.7.a. 1st Offense. Offenders will participate in a drug education and/or counseling program at their cost (currently $100.00), and parental notification of offenses will occur.
3.3.7.b. 2nd Offense. Offenders will participate in additional drug counseling and assessment and follow all counseling recommendations. Offenders will pay the fee for this program (currently $100.00), Conduct probation for a term to be determined by the judicial process, and parental notification of offenses.
3.3.7.c. 3rd Offense. Suspension from the university for a period of at least one semester.

3.3.8 Sanctions for consumption, public display or excessive use of alcohol (see section 3.5) by students 21 and older that require the involvement of campus police or the office of student affairs shall be determined on a case-by-case basis, but may include:

3.3.8.a. 1st Offense. Offenders will participate in a drug education and/or counseling program at their cost (currently $100.00).
3.3.8.b. 2nd Offense. Offenders will participate in additional drug counseling and assessment and follow all counseling recommendations. Offenders will pay the fee for this program (currently $100.00) and be placed on conduct probation for a term to be determined by the judicial process.
3.3.8.c. 3rd Offense. Suspension from the university for a period of at least one
semester.

3.3.9 It is against the law for anyone to sell or give any alcoholic beverage to a person under twenty-one (21) year of age or to aid or abet such a person in selling, purchasing, or possessing any alcoholic beverage. Any person under 21years old who aids or abets an underage person in violating this law may be fined $500, imprisoned for 6 months, or both. Any person 21 years or older who aids or abets an underage person to violate this law may be fined $2000, imprisoned for 2 years, or both (General Statute 18B-302). It is the policy of the university to cooperate with local law enforcement who may be investigating incidents where violations of this law have been committed on and off campus. Minimum sanctions for students over 21 who provide alcohol to minors:

3.3.9.a. Offenders will participate in a drug education and/or counseling program at their cost (currently $100.00). This program will focus on alcohol laws, responsible service practices, and social host liability laws.
3.3.9.b. Conduct probation for a term to be determined by the judicial process.
3.3.9.c. A second offense of this violation will mean suspension from the university for a period of at least one semester.

3.3.10 Campus mandatory drug education and assessment must be completed within forty (40) business days of the initial referral; if not, the student must complete an approved off-campus drug education/counseling program at his/her expense BEFORE being permitted to register for future classes or graduate. Failure to keep campus drug education/counseling appointments will result in a $25.00 fee for each missed appointment.

3.3.11 Guests in violation of the Drug and Alcohol Policy shall be required to leave campus and could face additional sanctions, including arrest and criminal charges. Students who have guests on campus are responsible for their guests at all times and will be held accountable for their guest’s actions.

3.3.12 Penalties for employees who violate any applicable laws or university policies regarding illegal possession or use of alcohol or provision of alcohol to persons under 21 years of age will be determined on a case-by-case basis and will cover the entire range of penalties available to the university as an employer, including but not limited to suspension and discharge from employment.

3.4 Social Host Liability Law
3.4.1 In addition to the substantial criminal penalties for furnishing alcohol to an underage person and/or helping an underage person obtain alcohol, individuals and student groups serving alcohol to friends or guests should be aware that if:

3.4.1.a. a person serves an alcoholic beverage to someone whom the server knew, or should have known, was under the influence of alcohol, and

3.4.1.b. the server knew that person would shortly thereafter drive an automobile; a jury could conclude, some injury could result from the negligent conduct. This means that, if someone is injured by a drunk driver and sues the person(s) who served the driver alcohol, a jury might find that the server(s) were partly responsible for the injuries and order the server(s) to pay substantial damages to the injured person or his/her estate. Significant personal consequences could result to the host or provider of the alcohol. The above information is not intended as legal advice. If uncertain about this issue, contact a private attorney.

3.5 Excessive and/or Harmful Use of Alcohol
3.5.1 Substance abuse, especially alcohol abuse, is a significant problem on university campuses. The university strives to create a healthy academic and social environment that states high-risk or underage drinking will not be tolerated. Excessive and/or harmful use of alcohol is any abuse of alcoholic beverages, as determined on a case-by-case basis by the director of student conduct. Examples of excessive and/or harmful use of alcohol include, but are not limited to:

3.5.1.a. use of alcohol which leads to medical consequences such as passing out, blackouts (loss of memory), gastritis (vomiting, retching), physical injuries, or other medical problems;
3.5.1.b. use of alcohol in association with inappropriate behavior;
3.5.1.c. a pattern of episodes of alcohol related violations of the Student Code of Conduct; and,

3.5.1.d. a single episode of intoxication in which the director of student conduct believes that the level of alcohol consumption posed a risk to the student’s health or well-being. Students who fall under this category of policy violation may be referred to the Emergency Health and Safety Committee if their behavior is deemed a safety risk (Section V, Administrative Policies of the Student Handbook).

3.6 Illegal Possession of Drugs and/or Paraphernalia for UNCP Students, Staff, and Faculty
3.6.1 Illegal drugs and drug usage. The usage (including, but not limited to, consumption, injection, smoking/inhalation, etc.), manufacture, possession, or distribution of illegal drugs or significantly mind-altering substances, pharmaceutical and otherwise (including salvia divinorum, medical marijuana, and synthetic forms of banned substances, including, but not limited to, K2, Spice, Black Magic, etc.); inappropriate/illegal use or distribution of any pharmaceutical product; being in the presence of others while the above mentioned drug use is occurring; or possession of drug paraphernalia, including bongs.

3.6.2 For a first offense involving the illegal possession or use of any controlled substance identified in Schedule I, N.C. General Statute § 90-89, or Schedule II, N.C. General Statute § 90-90, (including, but not limited to, heroin, mescaline, lysergic acid diethylamide, opium, cocaine, amphetamine, methaqualone), the minimum penalty shall be suspension from enrollment and from employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent. Employees subject to the State Personnel Act are governed by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. Minimum penalties for this offense exceeds the maximum period of suspension without pay that is permitted by the State Personnel Commission regulations, so the penalty for a first offense for employees subject to the State Personnel Act is discharge from employment.

3.6.3 Students who receive an offense involving the illegal possession or use of any controlled substance identified in Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes § 90-91 through 90-94, (including, but not limited to, marijuana, rohypnol, phenobarbital, codeine) and/or the possession of drug paraphernalia, the minimum penalty shall be:

3.6.3.a. 1st Offense. Conduct probation for a period to be determined on a case-by- case basis, mandatory participation in a drug education and assessment program (currently $100 for students), and parental notification. This does not preclude criminal action from being initiated.
3.6.3.b. 2nd Offense. For a second or other subsequent offenses involving illegal possession of controlled substances identified in Schedules III-IVI, progressively more severe penalties shall be imposed. For students, the minimum penalty cannot be less than suspension for a period of at least a semester; more severe penalties may be imposed, including expulsion. To be readmitted after a suspension, the student (at his/her own expense) must submit documentation of completed drug education and assessment at least equivalent to that which would have been received at the university, multiple negative drug tests over a period of time, and meet such other conditions as the university may require.
This does not preclude criminal action from being initiated.

3.6.4 Campus mandatory drug education and assessment for students must be completed within 40 business days of the initial referral. If not, the student must complete an approved off-campus drug education and assessment program at his/her expense BEFORE being permitted to register for future classes, transfer, or graduate. Failure to keep campus drug education and assessment appointments will result in a $25.00 fee for each missed appointment. This fee applies to all referred offenders from campus police, student affairs, and athletics.

3.6.5 Students’ participation in illegal drug activity off campus may be grounds for imposition of sanctions by the university when a nexus to that activity exists on campus. Such activities may include, but are not limited to, drug testing results for internship participation or athletic requirements. Athletes referred directly by the athletic director for NCAA regulation violations do not incur the above fees, but are subject to the missed appointment fee.

3.6.6 Section 483 of the Federal Higher Education Amendments of 1998 states: “A student who has been convicted of any offense under Federal or State law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance SHALL NOT BE ELIGIBLE TO RECEIVE ANY GRANT, LOAN, OR WORK ASSISTANCE under this title during the period beginning on the date of such conviction” and lasting for one year, two years, or indefinitely, depending on the offense.

3.6.7 Penalties for employees who violate any applicable laws or university policies regarding illegal possession or use of any controlled substance identified in Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through 90-94, (including, but not limited to, marijuana, rohypnol, phenobarbital, codeine) and/or the possession of drug paraphernalia will be determined on a case-by-case basis and will cover the entire range of penalties available to the university as an employer, including but not limited to, probation, suspension, and discharge from employment. If an unexpired balance of the prescribed period of probation for an employee subject to the State Personnel Act exceeds the maximum period of suspension without pay permitted by the State Personnel Commission regulations, that employee shall be discharged.

3.7 Trafficking in Illegal Drugs for UNCP Students, Staff, and Faculty
3.7.1 For the illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession with intent to manufacture, sale or deliver, any controlled substance identified in Schedule I, N.C. General Statutes 90-89 or Schedule II, N.C. General Statutes 90-90 (including, but not limited to, heroin, mescaline, lysergic acid diethylamide, opium, cocaine, amphetamine, methaqualone), any student shall be expelled and any employee shall be terminated.

3.7.2 For a first offense involving the illegal manufacture, sale or delivery, or possession with intent to manufacture, sale or deliver, any controlled substance identified in Schedules III through VI, N.C. General Statutes 90-91 through 90-94, (including, but not limited to, marijuana,
rohypnol, phenobarbital, codeine), the minimum penalty shall be suspension from enrollment or employment for a period of at least one semester or its equivalent. Employees subject to the State Personnel Act are governed by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. Minimum penalties for this first offense exceed the maximum period of suspension without pay that is permitted by the State Personnel Commission regulations; so, the penalty for a first offense for employees subject to the State Personnel Act is discharge from employment.

3.7.3 For a second offense, any student shall be expelled and any employee shall be terminated.

3.8 Abuse of Prescription and/or Over-the-Counter Medications
3.8.1 The abuse of legal medications can lead to serious health complications for the user. Abuse of some medications can also lead the individual to exhibit behavior which is dangerous to self and others. The university strongly supports efforts of individuals to change maladaptive behavior and offers services through the Counseling and Psychological Services, Student Health Services, and EAP. Continued abuse and disruptive behavior may result in disciplinary action.

3.9 Hazing for UNCP Students and Student Groups
3.9.1 The N. C. General Statute § 14-35 defines hazing as follows: “to subject another student to physical injury as part of an initiation, or as a prerequisite to membership, into any organized school group.”

3.9.2 Hazing violations involving drugs and/or alcohol will be required to participate in the campus mandatory drug education/counseling program as well as incur all costs associated with the program.

3.10 Suspension Pending Final Disposition
3.10.1 A student, faculty member, administrator, or other employee charged with a violation of this policy may be suspended from enrollment and employment before initiation or completion of regular disciplinary proceedings if, assuming the truth of the charges, the chancellor or his/her designee concludes that the person’s continued presence would constitute a clear and immediate danger to the health or welfare of any member of the university community. When a suspension is imposed, an appropriate hearing of the charges against the person suspended shall be held as promptly as possible.

3.11 Process for Imposition of Penalties
3.11.1 Students, faculty, and staff are subject to all local, state, and federal laws relating to drug use and possession. Action on the part of the university is based upon its right to carry out its appropriate mission and is not designed to be merely punitive. University action is not dependent upon and does not preclude criminal or civil action in the courts.

3.11.2 Penalties will be imposed by the university in accordance with procedural safeguards applicable to disciplinary actions against students, faculty members, administrators, and other employees, as required by Section 502 D (3) and Section 603 of the University The Code; by the Board of Governors policies applicable to other employees exempt from the State
Personnel Act; and by regulations of the State Personnel Commission. Faculty should refer to section 4, page 63, “Due Process Before Discharge or the Imposition of Serious Sanctions for Tenure Track Faculty” and section 11, page 201, in the Faculty Handbook. Students should refer to Chapter IV., Rights & Responsibilities. SPA employees should refer to the State Personnel Manual, (available through the Human Resources Office or on the OSP Website) Section 7, “Discipline, Appeals and Grievances,” and UNCP’s “SPA Employee Grievance and Appeal Policy.” EPA employees should refer to the UNCP’s handbook for EPA employees, “Personnel Policies for Employees Exempt from the State Personnel Act, UNCP,”, Section IV.

3.12 Policy Implementation and Reporting
3.12.1 All drug and alcohol violations on the UNCP campus are reported via the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act [20 US Code 1092 (f)] (CACSA), required by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. The report is compiled in accordance with the guidelines set forth in the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Postsecondary Education, The Handbook for Campus Crime Reporting, Washington, DC, 2005, and is completed by Campus Police.

4. HEALTH RISKS OF PSYCHOACTIVE DRUGS
4.1 All psychoactive drugs (including alcohol) can produce negative health risks associated with long-term chronic use. Some, but not all, related health risks are listed below.

4.1.a. Alcohol (medically classified as a depressant). Central nervous system depression, impaired judgment, liver damage, malnutrition,
pancreatitis, lowered immunities, and severe birth defects in babies
whose mothers used alcohol during pregnancy. An overdose may result
in a coma and death.
4.1.b. Cocaine. Anxiety, insomnia, paranoia, perforation of the nasal septum, seizures, and cardiac arrest.
4.1.c. Depressants (e.g., Librium, Xanax, Valium). Central nervous system
depression, staggering gait, visual disturbances, lethargy, dizziness, and
nausea.
4.1.d. Hallucinogens (e.g., LSD, PCP, and hallucinogenic mushrooms). Visual distortions, increased heart rate and blood pressure, psychotic episodes, panic disorders, and flashbacks.
4.1.e. Inhalants. Nausea, headaches, and perceptual distortions. Permanent
damage to bone marrow, lungs, liver, and kidneys and a risk of lung or
cardiac arrest with initial or repeated use.
4.1.f. Marijuana. Increased heart rate, lowered body temperature, impaired
coordination, appetite stimulation, weakened immune system, increased
risk of throat/lung cancer, and speech/memory/learning distortions. Long
term use may result in short term memory loss, a motivational
syndrome, and reproductive system abnormalities.
4.1.g. Narcotics (e.g., codeine, heroin, morphine). Shallow breathing, reduced sex drive, apathy, anxiety, mood swings, nausea, and respiratory
depression. An overdose may induce a coma, convulsions, respiratory
arrest, or death.
4.1.h. Rohypnol (flunitrazepam, commonly called the date rape drug).
Drowsiness, impaired motor skills, and inability to recall events.
Combined with alcohol or other drugs may lead to respiratory
depression, aspiration, and death.
4.1.i. Stimulants (amphetamines). Anxiety, agitation, malnutrition, irregular
heartbeat, chronic sleeplessness, and amphetamine psychosis.


UNC Pembroke Tailgating Policies Involving Alcohol

1. GOVERNING PRINCIPLES

1.1 It is illegal and a violation of university policy for any person less than 21 years of age to consume, purchase, or possess an alcoholic beverage. All policies and procedures for possession, consumption, and handling of alcoholic beverages must comply with NCGS § 18B-1002, and university policy. Violators will be disciplined in accordance with appropriate university rules and regulations, in addition to penalties under state law. All students should be familiar with the alcohol beverage laws of North Carolina. Student possession and/or consumption of any alcoholic beverage are prohibited at all locations except as indicated in The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Drug and Alcohol Policy. Current exceptions to the UNCP drug and alcohol policy include:

1.1.a. students aged 21 years and older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol in residence halls;

1.1.b. students aged 21 years and older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol at the UNCP homecoming semi-formal dance; and

1.1.c. students aged 21 years and older are permitted to possess and consume alcohol while tailgating in designated areas or parking lots prior to UNCP football games.

1.2 Specific procedures must exist to check and identify underage persons any time alcoholic beverage consumption by such persons may occur.

1.3 Under no circumstance may any department, office, person, organization, or business sell alcoholic beverages on the university's campus. "Sale" means any transfer, trade, exchange, or barter, in any manner or by any means, for consideration, including, but not limited to, required fees or the purchase of tickets for admission to an event at which alcoholic beverages will be served. Likewise, donations may not be required or solicited in connection with such an event. [NCGS §18B-1002 and 1006]

2. AUTHORIZED AREAS ON CAMPUS

2.1 Unless prohibited by administrative action, alcoholic beverages on campus may be possessed or consumed in the following university designated locations only:

2.1.a. the campus residences of legal age students and guests. For the purposes of this policy, the residence of a student living in a residence hall is defined as only the assigned campus room in the residence hall and does not include any public or common area of the residence hall; and,

2.1.b. university approved tailgating events at home football games. The only alcoholic beverages that may be consumed at university approved tailgating events are malt beverages and unfortified wine. Tailgating may only occur in approved campus tailgating parking lots: Belk Complex Lot 24 and Jones Lot 14. See information below for rules and procedures concerning tailgating.

3. TAILGATING

3.1 Tailgating. Defined as parking or gathering on the UNCP campus and consuming food and/or beverages, tailgating at UNCP home football games is only permitted in Belk Complex Lot 24 and Jones Center Lot 14. Tailgating will be permitted to begin three-and-a-half (3.5) hours before kick-off. No tailgating is permitted at UNCP during or after home athletic games. Access to parking Lot 24 will require a UNCP issued parking permit from the Advancement Office valid only for football games. Parking Lot 14 is a paid parking lot that charges $5 per vehicle. Persons in Lot 14 who wish to drink alcohol MUST have an age identification bracelet. Age
identification bracelets will be issued in Lot 14 to persons presenting legal proof of age. Public display of alcoholic beverage brand label packaging is prohibited. No games of entertainment that use alcohol or implements, which encourage excessive alcohol consumption, will be permitted.

3.2 Alcohol. The only alcoholic beverages that may be consumed at university approved tailgating events are malt beverages and unfortified wine.

3.3 Keg. A keg is any container that holds, or is capable of holding, more than one (1) gallon at a single time of a malt beverage or unfortified wine. Kegs are prohibited on the UNCP campus for any event.

3.4 Grilling. Grilling is allowed in designated areas within Lots 24 and 14. Grills using propane gas are allowed and are preferred. The maximum propane gas cylinder size allowed is twenty (20) lbs. Grills using charcoal are permitted, but users must dispose of coals in marked containers located in Lots 24 and 14. Tailgaters should not dispose of charcoal in any non-marked container or in grass, woods, parking lots, or trash cans.

3.5 Lot 24. Lot 24 is located at the Belk Complex, adjacent to the Caton Fieldhouse and stadium. Access to this lot is by special permit only on the day of UNCP home football games. The Office for Advancement will issue Lot 24 permits. Parking Lot 24 will be closed beginning at 9 p.m. the evening prior to a UNCP home football game. Any car remaining in Lot 24 will be towed at 7 a.m. on the day of UNCP's home football games. UNCP students, faculty, and staff with valid UNCP parking permits who normally park in Lot 24 may relocate their vehicles to any legal parking lot on campus except lots 14, 24, 24A, 24B, and 24C. Notification of the need to move vehicles will begin a week prior to any home game. Vehicles remaining will be towed at owner's expense.

3.6 Lot 14. Lot 14 is located in front of the Jones Center on University Road. Lot 14 is a paid parking lot. Parking charge for Lot 14 is $5 for cars and trucks. Parking for oversized vehicles and RVs that fill more than one spot will be charged $10. Parking Lot 14 will be closed beginning at 9:00 p.m. the evening prior to a UNCP home football game. Any car remaining in Lot 14 will be towed at 7:00 a.m. on the day of UNCP's home football games. UNCP students, faculty, and staff with valid UNCP parking permits who normally park in Lot 14 may relocate their vehicles to any legal parking lot on campus except lots 14, 24, 24A, 24B, and 24C. Notification of the need to move vehicles will begin a week prior to any home game. Vehicles remaining will be towed at owner's expense.

4. ALCOHOL EXCEPTION FOR TAILGATING AT UNCP FOOTBALL GAMES

4.1 Tailgating at which alcoholic beverages are consumed shall apply to all NCAA football games and scrimmages and may begin no more than three-and-a-half (3.5) hours before an event and must end promptly at game time. Tailgating is ONLY permitted prior to home football games in designated areas approved by UNCP. Tailgating participants will be encouraged to leave the lots at game time by the Office of Student Affairs and the Braves Club, in cooperation with campus police. No tailgating will be permitted during or after games. People who leave the stadium during games will not be allowed to reenter the stadium. Motor homes and RVs are permitted to park in Lot 14 at the NW corner.

4.2 No kegs are permitted at tailgating activities. Public display of alcoholic beverage brand label packaging is prohibited. All beverages should be in a cup. The use of plastic containers is encouraged for the consumption of all beverages. Glass containers are prohibited in all tailgating areas. No games of entertainment that use alcohol or implements, which encourage excessive alcohol consumption, will be permitted.

4.3 The chancellor's cabinet, in consultation with campus police, will designate approved tailgating areas. The consumption of alcoholic beverages inside the stadium is strictly prohibited.

4.4 The Athletic Department is responsible for posting signs that communicate the campus alcohol policy in designated tailgating parking lots.

4.5 All tailgaters are responsible for the proper disposal of their trash and other debris. UNCP Facilities Operations will provide trash containers in tailgating areas and will periodically pick-up trash during tailgating hours. Containers will be provided for the disposal of hot coals. For safety purposes, glass containers are NOT allowed in tailgating areas.

4.6 Campus police will provide mobile patrol through designated tailgating areas before, during, and after the games. Campus police will be stationed in or nearby designated tailgating areas to enforce state laws for violations that may occur.

4.7 At game time, staff members from the Athletic Department, Braves Club, and Office of Student Affairs will remind all individuals in tailgating areas of the restrictions on alcohol consumption after the game begins. With the assistance of campus police, they will encourage all individuals to leave tailgating areas and move into the stadium at the start of the game.

4.8 Lot 24

4.8.1 Special permits, issued by the Office for Advancement and Athletic Department, are required to park in Lot 24 during home football games. The Office for Advancement, Braves Club, and the Athletic Department will provide personnel to control access to tailgating areas in Lot 24. Representatives from the Office for Advancement will provide information on the university's alcohol policy and state laws governing alcohol consumption to individuals in Lot 24. Access to restroom facilities for persons participating in tailgating activities in Lot 24 is the responsibility of the Athletic Department, Office for Advancement, and the Braves Club.

4.9 Lot 14

4.9.1 Parking Lot 14 is a paid parking lot. The Athletic Department will assist in directing cars in this lot and will carry police radios so they may be summoned to assist with problems that involve tailgating in Lot 14. The Department of Athletics will provide information on the
university's alcohol policy and state laws governing alcohol consumption to individuals in Lot 14. Persons wishing to drink alcohol in Lot 14 must be issued an age identification bracelet. Access to restroom facilities is available in Lot 14. Beginning fifteen-to-thirty minutes before game time, campus police will patrol Lot 14 to enforce the alcohol policy and state laws as necessary.

4.10 UNCP reserves the right to amend this policy at any time and for any reason with appropriate notice, including closing any parking lots, and to place additional restrictions or conditions on persons entering areas where tailgating is allowed.


Smoking Ban

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP) is dedicated to maintaining a healthy work and learning environment. UNCP values the individual rights as well as the well-being of all its faculty, staff, and students. On occasion a conflict arises between personal rights and community interests. Smoking is such an issue of contention.

North Carolina law, enacted July 1, 2007, allows universities to regulate smoking at properties owned or leased by a state university. The majority of buildings on UNCP's campus have been smoke free for several years. This policy will now expand to include State owned vehicles, all State owned buildings and their 100 foot perimeter as part of the non-smoking policy.

Smoking receptacles are being removed from building entrances and will be relocated wherever possible outside the 100 foot perimeter.

This policy applies to all University visitors, students, and employees, including faculty, EPA non-faculty, staff and student employees. It is the responsibility of every member of the University community to conduct himself or herself in compliance with this policy.

The complete policy is available on our Web site at www.uncp.edu/sa/pol_pub/.


Emergency Health and Safety Policy 

 


Free Speech Event Policy

 

 

North Carolina General Statute 18B-302: Alcohol

Any person who is under the lawful age to purchase and who aids or abets another in violation of this law shall be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine up to $500 or imprisonment for not more than six months, or both, in the discretion of the court. Any person who is over the lawful age to purchase and who aids or abets a person under the lawful age to purchase shall be guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine of up to $2,000 or imprisonment for not more than two years, or both, in the discretion of the court. It shall be unlawful for any person to obtain or attempt to obtain alcoholic beverages by using or attempting to use: (1) a fraudulent or altered driver's license; or (2) fraudulent documents other than a driver's license; or (3) a driver's license issued to another person; or (4) an identification document other than a driver's license issued to another person. Upon receipt of a conviction report, the Division of Motor Vehicles shall revoke the person's driver's license as required by G.S. 20-17.3.


North Carolina General Statute 14-35: Hazing

The North Carolina General Statute (14-35) defines hazing as follows: "to subject another student to physical injury as part of an initiation, or as a prerequisite to membership, into any organized school group, including any society, athletic team, fraternity or sorority, or other similar group." A student convicted of engaging or abetting in the commission of such an offense may be subject to punishment by a fine of $1,000, imprisonment for a maximum period of between 30 and 60 days, or both such a fine and imprisonment. The institution may expel a student convicted under this statute regardless of and in addition to any criminal penalty imposed by the court. Organizations whose members are convicted of hazing should be mindful of possible administrative action against the organization by the University; the appropriate question in such situations would be whether the organization can and should be held responsible for the conduct of its members, with the possible consequence that sanctions would be taken against the organization, e.g., withdrawal of University recognition, banning from campus, etc.


Policy of the Board of Governors of The UNC Concerning Improper Relationships Between Students and Employees

The University of North Carolina does not condone amorous relationships between students and employees. Members of the University community should avoid such liaisons, which can harm affected students and damage the integrity of the academic enterprise. Further, sexual relationships between unmarried persons can result in criminal liability. In two types of
situations, University prohibition and punishment of amorous relationships is deemed necessary: (1) when the employee is responsible for evaluating or supervising the affected student; and (2) when the student is a minor, as defined by North Carolina law. The following policies shall apply to all employees and students of the sixteen constituent institutions.

A. Prohibited Conduct

1. It is misconduct, subject to disciplinary action, for a University employee, incident to any instructional, research, administrative, or other University employment responsibility or authority, to evaluate or supervise any enrolled student of the institution with whom he or she has an amorous relationship or to whom he or she is related by blood, law, or marriage.

2. It is misconduct, subject to disciplinary action, for a University employee to engage in sexual activity with any enrolled student of the institution, other than his or her spouse, who is a minor below the age of 18 years.

B. Definition of Terms

1. "Amorous relationship." An amorous relationship exists when, without the
benefit of marriage, two persons as consenting partners (a) have a sexual union or (b) engage in a romantic partnering or courtship that may or may not have been consummated
sexually.

2. "Related by blood, law or marriage" means:

a. Parent and child

b. Brother and sister

c. Grandparent and grandchild

d. Aunt and/or uncle and niece and/or nephew

e. First cousins

f. Stepparent and stepchild

g. Husband and wife

h. Parents-in-law and children-in-law

i. Brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law

j. Guardian and ward

3. "Evaluate or supervise" means:

a. To assess, determine or influence (1) one's academic performance, progress or potential or (2) one's entitlement to or eligibility for any institutionally conferred right, benefit, or opportunity, or

b. To oversee, manage or direct one's academic or other institutionally prescribed activities.

C. Corrective Action

Violations of the provisions of Section A shall be addressed in accordance with remedial measures prescribed by each constituent institution; if disciplinary action is brought against an affected employee, it shall be conducted in accordance with existing institutional policies and procedures prescribed for prosecuting misconduct charges against members of the class of employment of which the affected employee is a member.


Policy Prohibiting Illegal Harassment and Discrimination

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 The University of North Carolina at Pembroke affirms its desire to maintain a work environment for all employees and an academic environment for all faculty and students that is free from all forms of harassment and discrimination. UNCP wishes to maintain an
environment which supports and rewards individuals on the basis of such relevant factors as academic ability and work performance. Conduct or action that is based on a person's race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, disability, or veteran status creating a hostile environment that prevents effective learning or work performance is in opposition to a campus environment free of harassment.

2. VIOLATIONS

2.1 No student or student group shall engage in conduct, or assist another in the following conduct:

2.1.a. Discrimination on the basis of race, color, ethnicity, national origin, religion, creed, age, disability, honorable service in the armed services of the United States, or sex, except as allowed under Title IX, that impairs or may impair an individual's university working conditions, privileges, or opportunities for university employment, educational opportunities, participation in university-sponsored extracurricular activities, or opportunities to benefit from other aspects of university life. Religious student groups with bona fide religious beliefs that will be contradicted by the group's compliance with this provision should contact the vice chancellor for student affairs to obtain the university's policy regarding requests for exceptions under this provision.

2.1.b. Harassment or intimidation directed toward a particular person or persons that is severe or pervasive and abuses or otherwise unreasonably interferes with another so as to adversely affect their academic pursuits, opportunities for university employment, participation in university-sponsored extracurricular activities, or opportunities to benefit from other aspects of university life.

2.1.c. Threats that involve violation of restraining orders or no-contact orders imposed by government or campus authorities, stalking, or other activities that create a reasonable apprehension of physical or emotional harm to an individual following a request or order to desist.

2.1.d. The face-to-face use of "fighting words" to harass any person or persons on the university campus or other property under university control. "Fighting words" are those personally abusive epithets which, when directly addressed to any ordinary person, are in the context used and as a matter of common knowledge, inherently likely to provoke an immediate and violent reaction, whether or not they actually do so.

2.2 Students violating this policy may be subject to disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.

3. TO REPORT VIOLATIONS

3.1 Students experiencing harassment as described herein should contact campus police or provide a written statement to the vice chancellor for student affairs. Complaints against UNCP students will be governed by the procedures stated in Chapter IV., Rights & Responsibilities. Student complaints against UNCP faculty or staff will be governed by the procedures stated in the Student Grievance Policy.

3.2 Members of the university community are prohibited from acts of retaliation against individuals who bring complaints or are involved as witnesses in any action connected with this policy.

4. SPECIFIC PROHIBITIONS AGAINST DISCRIMINATION AT UNCP

4.1 Sex. As required by Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, UNCP does not discriminate on the basis of sex in the educational programs and activities it operates except in the manner and to the degree allowed by Title IX. This protection against discrimination extends but is not limited to employment with and admission as a student to UNCP. Inquiries about and complaints of any violation of Title IX may be directed to the director of human resources for UNCP, who is designated by UNCP to coordinate and carry out its responsibilities under Title IX and related regulations, either directly or through a designee. Inquiries and complaints regarding violation of Title IX with regard to athletics at UNCP may also be directed to the Department of Athletics senior woman's administrator.

4.2 Disability. As and to the extent required by Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, UNCP does not discriminate on the basis of disability in the educational programs and other activities it operates. Inquiries about and complaints of any violation of Section 504 or Title II by students may be directed to the director of disability support services for UNCP, who is designated by UNCP to coordinate and carry out its responsibilities under Section 504, Title II, and related regulations, either directly or through a designee.

4.3 Complaints and Grievance Processes. Complaints by students alleging violations of Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 will be handled through the Student Grievance Policy if no other grievance process (e.g., the Sexual Assault Policy, Student Handbook) is more directly applicable as determined by the director of human resources.

4.4 The director of human resources can be contacted at Department of Human Resources, Room 347, Lumbee Hall, UNC Pembroke, One University Drive, Pembroke, NC 28372,telephone 910-521-6279. The senior woman's administrator can be contacted at Department of Athletics, Room 1182, Jones Health and Physical Education Center, One University Drive, Pembroke, NC 28372, telephone 910-521-6809.

4.5 Complaints by students alleging violations of Section 504 and or Title II will be handled through the Disabled Student Grievance Policy, which is available from the director of disability support services, if no other grievance process is more directly applicable as determined by the director of disability support services. The director of disability support services can be contacted at Disability Support Services, Room 111, D.F. Lowry Building, UNC Pembroke, One University Drive, Pembroke, NC 28372, telephone 910-521-6890.


Sexual Assault Policy

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 The University of North Carolina at Pembroke has zero-tolerance for sexual assault and sex offenses committed against students, employees, visitors to the campus, and other persons who use university facilities. The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is committed to the prevention of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses.

2. SEXUAL ASSAULT, SEXUAL MISCONDUCT, SEXUAL EXPLOITATION, AND OTHER SEXUAL OFFENCES

2.1 The University of North Carolina at Pembroke publishes an annual report of campus crimes, including sexual assault, as is required by the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act. This landmark federal law, originally known as the Campus Security Act, requires colleges and universities across the United States to disclose information about crime on and around their campuses.

3. DEFINITIONS

3.1 Sexual assault may include any involuntary sexual act in which a person is threatened, coerced, or forced to engage in against his or her will or while temporarily or permanently incapacitated. Sexual assault may be committed by a stranger or by a person known by the victim.

3.2 Acts defined as sexual assault include rape, date rape, acquaintance rape, and gang rape, but may also include sexual touching of another person against his or her will or without consent, and forcing an unwilling person to touch another person sexually.

3.3 Sexual assault occurs when sexual acts are committed either without consent, by force, threat, or intimidation, or through the use of the victim's mental or physical helplessness, of which the assailant was aware or should have been aware.

3.4 Sexual misconduct may include any attempted or actual act of non-consensual or forcible sexual touching. This would include, but is not limited to, fondling, kissing, groping, attempted intercourse (whether oral, anal or genital), or attempted penetration with a digit or any other object.

3.5 Sexual exploitation is taking non-consensual, unjust, or abusive sexual advantage of another for one's own advantage or benefit; or to benefit or advantage anyone other than the one being exploited; and, that behavior does not otherwise constitute rape, sexual assault, or sexual harassment.

3.6 Examples of sexual exploitation include, but are not limited to: prostituting another student, non-consensual video or audio taping of sexual activity, going beyond the boundaries of consent (such as letting friends surreptitiously watch you having consensual sex or unauthorized distribution of photos or other materials of a sexual nature), engaging in voyeurism, and inducing incapacitation with the intent to rape or sexually assault another person or with the intent to create opportunity for a third party to rape or sexually assault another person.

3.7 Other sexual offenses may include obscene or indecent behavior, which includes, but is not limited to, exposure of one's sexual organs without physically contacting the victim; or the display of sexual behavior that would reasonably be offensive to others.

4. IDENTIFYING DRUG FACILITATED SEXUAL ASSAULT

4.1 Nationwide there has been an increase of drug related sexual assaults. Rohypnol and GHB are perhaps the most widely publicized. Due to the accessibility of these drugs and others, it is essential for those parties involved to consider a full range of drugs that have sedative or hypnotic effects and not to focus on detecting a single drug. Drugs used to facilitate rape generally produce an anesthesia like effect, rendering victims unconscious or unable to give consent. Depending on the type of drug administered, the victim of a drug-facilitated sexual assault may exhibit signs of memory loss, dizziness, confusion, drowsiness, or a variety of other symptoms. The victim may be unable to provide a complete account of the assault or of the events surrounding it. Due to the memory loss, there might be a delay in the reporting of the sexual assault. UNCP should view such delays as a natural consequence of the crime and do not allow reporting delays to discourage comprehensive and creative responses,
including investigation. Even though it may be impossible to detect the drug used to facilitate the rape, it may still be possible to prosecute successfully - especially if investigators identify additional victims of the same rapist. There needs to be immediate arrangements made for drug testing. Call either the campus police and/or Southeastern Regional Medical Center to make arrangements for testing.

5. RESPONSIBILITY TO REPORT

5.1 Any student, faculty member, staff member, administrator, or visitor to the campus who has experienced, witnessed, or has knowledge of a sexual assault, sexual misconduct, or other sexual offenses may report the assault immediately to The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Campus Police. If the assault occurred outside the jurisdiction of the university police, they will assist in reporting it to the proper authorities.

5.2 Sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses may also be reported to the Pembroke Police Department, if it occurred within city limits, or to the police of another municipality if the assault occurred within another township or city that has a police force. It may be reported to the Robeson County Sheriff's Department if it occurred outside city limits but within the county. Sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses may also be reported to the Robeson County Rape Crisis Center.

5.3 The university community encourages the reporting of conduct code violations and crimes by victims. Sometimes, victims are hesitant to report to university officials because they fear that they themselves may be accused of policy violations, such as underage drinking at the time of the incident. It is in the best interests of this community that as many victims as
possible choose to report to university officials. To encourage reporting, the university pursues a policy of offering victims and witnesses/bystanders to crimes amnesty from policy violations related to the incident.

5.4 The welfare of students in our community is of paramount importance. Students both on and off-campus may need assistance. The university encourages students to offer help and assistance to others in need. Sometimes, students are hesitant to offer assistance to others, for fear that they may get themselves in trouble (for example, a student who has been drinking underage might hesitate to help take a sexual misconduct victim to the campus police). The university pursues a policy of limited immunity for students who offer help to others in need. While policy violations cannot be overlooked, the university will provide educational options, rather than punishment, to those who offer their assistance to others in need.

6. PRESERVING EVIDENCE

6.1 It is important that evidence of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses be preserved, because it may be needed for prosecuting the criminal case. Complainants and others should not alter the scene of attack. The complainant should not change clothes, bathe, shower, douche, drink or eat anything if possible, or brush her/his teeth before reporting the assault. Any items worn by the complainant during the assault, but are not currently being worn, and any materials encountered during the assault (i.e. bed sheets, blankets, etc.) should be placed in a brown paper bag and brought along with the complainant to a local hospital emergency department that has kits to collect and preserve evidence of rape and sexual assault.

7. AVAILABILITY OF COUNSELING AND ADVOCACY

7.1 Counseling and other mental health services for victims of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses are available on campus and in the community. Students may use the Counseling Center at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Employees of the university may seek a one-time consultation for referral from the Counseling Center or contact the EAP through Human Resources.

7.2 Robeson County Rape Crisis may also assist with making referrals for individual counseling and support groups. Rape Crisis may also assist victims with identifying non-counseling campus and community resources that may be of additional help and serve as a victim advocate upon request. Phone: The 24hr. crisis and administrative line is 910-739-6278, Address: Rape Crisis Center of Robeson County, 212 North Chestnut Street, Lumberton, NC 28358.

8. EDUCATION AND AWARENESS PROGRAMS

8.1 The Student Health Center and the Counseling and Testing Center are responsible for planning and coordinating campus education and awareness programs about all forms of sexual assault, including rape, acquaintance rape, and other sex offenses. Programs are presented regularly throughout the academic year in residence halls, academic classes, and for other student organizations and settings that are likely to reach people throughout the campus community. Campus-wide education and awareness activities are also conducted during Sexual Assault Prevention and Awareness Week. The Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) course is available to all students and is offered as a 1 credit hour course.

9. UNIVERSITY JUDICIAL SYSTEM AND CODE OF CONDUCT

9.1 When appropriate and regardless of whether the respondent is criminally prosecuted, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Police Department or any member of the university community may refer allegations of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses to the Office of Student Conduct for adjudication through the university hearing and appeals system. This system provides a just and equitable process for dealing with alleged infractions by students of university rules, regulations, or laws. The system is informal and is intended to educate students, to help them make responsible decisions, and to be accountable for their actions.

9.2 A UNCP student who has been victimized by sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses may seek redress through the campus judicial system if the respondent is also an enrolled student at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke. Such redress may be in conjunction with or in place of pressing charges in the court system. In order to charge a student for sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses within the university hearing and appeal system, the victim should report the offense to the director of student conduct or his/her designee. Once the report is made, an investigation will be initiated by the director of student conduct or his/her designee. The Campus Judicial Board (CJB) will be convened in cases where the respondent denies the charges.

9.3 The respondent(s) and the complainant(s) may have a non-participating friend/advisor from the campus community present with them throughout the hearing process and may present witnesses on their behalf. If a student is charged with conduct that may subject him or her to criminal prosecution, that student may have as his or her advisor an attorney who may be present, but cannot actively participate in any hearing or appeal except to consult with his or her client.

9.4 The penalty for a student found guilty of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses will at minimum be conditional probation, with the maximum penalty being suspension or expulsion from the institution. In the most severe cases involving forced rape and/or physical injury involving a weapon, the penalty will be expulsion. The severity of the offense and the potential for subsequent harm to the complainant/survivor or the community at large weigh heavily in the determination of what sanctions are imposed in such cases. The complainant's identity and all information concerning the offense are held in strict confidence by hearing authorities under the guidelines of FERPA. However, the university cannot guarantee confidentiality. Both the accuser and the person respondent shall be informed in writing of the outcome of any campus judicial proceeding or grievance procedure in which sexual assault is alleged.

10. CAMPUS JUDICIAL BOARD (CJB) AND ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS

10.1 The Campus Judicial Board (CJB) and administrative hearings will follow the procedures outlined in Chapter IV., Rights and Responsibilities. The following additional procedures and rights will be afforded students for cases involving charges of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual harassment, sexual exploitation, and other sexual offenses:

10.1.a. The respondent will have a pre-hearing interview with the director of student conduct or designee and the complainant will be offered the opportunity to have a pre-hearing meeting with the director of student conduct or designee.

10.1.b. Both the complainant and the respondent will have the opportunity to review all statements submitted for consideration by the Campus Judicial Board.

10.1.c. If the complainant has requested to have his/her identity remain confidential, any documents provided to the respondent will have any identifying information.

10.1.d. Complainants who wish to have their identity remain confidential will be notified that the university may have a limited ability to respond to the alleged charges.

10.1.e. After an appropriate review of the case, the university will inform the student if it is not possible to ensure confidentiality.

10.1.f. During a Campus Judicial Board hearing, both the complainant and the respondent will be permitted to question the testimony of the other. All questions will be posed to the chair of the Campus Judicial Board and if the question is relevant and proper the chair will echo the question to be answered.

10.1.g. The complainant may request that a screen, or similar device, be used in the hearing room to visually separate him/her from the respondent.

10.1.h. Both the complainant and the respondent will have the right to appeal cases involving violations of a sexual nature.

10.2 The complainant and respondent will follow the established policy for appeals of a Campus Judicial Board or administrative hearing case. In addition, the grounds for appeal in cases involving sexual offenses are listed below:

10.2.1 Respondent:

10.2.1.a. an alleged violation of the rights guaranteed the accused has occurred;

10.2.1.b. the sanction is too severe for the violation; or,

10.2.1.c. new evidence has developed which has bearing on the outcome.

10.2.2. Complainant:

10.2.2.a. an alleged violation of the rights guaranteed the complainant has occurred;

10.2.2.b. the sanction did not represent the severity of the violation committed; or,

10.2.2.c. new evidence has developed which has bearing on the outcome.

10.3 The complainant and/or respondent may appeal a decision by the Campus Judicial Board or administrative hearing officer to the Campus Appeals Board (CAB) using the grounds for appeal listed above. Following any appeal by the complainant and/or respondent to the CAB, the complainant and/or respondent may appeal to the vice chancellor for student affairs using the grounds listed above. The decision of the vice chancellor for student affairs will be final and no additional appeals may be filed.

10.4 Both the complainant and the respondent will be simultaneously notified of the outcome of the hearing and any subsequent appeal hearings.

10.5 Prior to, during or following the Campus Judicial Board hearing or administrative hearing, interim measures may be initiated by the university to minimize the impact on the complainant. These interim measures may include, but are NOT limited to: no contact order, housing relocation, reassignment of academic schedule, and interim suspension. When an interim suspension is imposed, a hearing of the charges against the suspended person(s) shall be held as expeditiously as possible.

11. TRAINING FOR CAMPUS JUDICIAL BOARD (CJB)

11.1 All members of the CJB should receive specific training about sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, and other sexual offenses prior to hearing sexual assault cases. Training should include, but not be limited to: review of student code of conduct; review of legal definitions of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, and other sexual crimes; information refuting myths about sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, and other sexual offenses; training on issues of consent and coercion; information about judging credibility including that a complainant's use of alcohol does not mean that s/he is lying about the assault; and, information about appropriate sanctions such as expulsion. The training can be provided either from internal or external sources. Training should happen on an annual basis.

12. ACCOMMODATION/CHANGE OPTIONS

12.1 Complainants of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, and other sexual offenses may receive assistance in making reasonable changes in their work, academic, or living situations. Students may request assistance in changing their living situations from the student housing department. A room change will be approved if alternative space exists. The student may also request a lock change if the assailant had knowledge or previous access. The complainant may also file a request form in the Registrar's Office to remove his/her directory information from public access.

12.2 A complainant of a sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses may also request the associate vice chancellor for academic affairs to change his/her class schedule to avoid contact with the respondent. Such requests will be honored when multiple sections of classes are available. Staff may request assistance in changing their work situations from their supervisors, work-study, graduate assistantship office, or Human Resources. Requests for such changes will be considered on the basis of their appropriateness and whether the requested change is reasonably available. Every effort will be made by the university to make the complainant feel cared for and safe.

13. RIGHTS OF RESPONDENTS

13.1 Any student enrolled at UNCP who is accused of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses, will be afforded full procedural due process in the
investigation and adjudication of his/her case. This shall include the right to the presumption of innocence until proven guilty and the privilege against self-incrimination.

14. RESIDENTIAL STAFF

14.1 A member of campus residential staff, such as resident assistants, hall directors, and resident administrators, is often the first to come in contact with a complainant of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses. Therefore, it is important that all staff members receive training on how to respond to complainants of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses.

14.2 Training should include, but not be limited to: review of student code of conduct; review of legal definitions of sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses; information refuting myths about sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses; training on issues of consent and coercion; information about judging credibility including a complainant's use of alcohol does not mean that s/he is lying about the assault; and, information about appropriate sanctions resulting from a sexual assault.

14.3 Training should also include on-campus and off-campus resources and referrals and information about maintaining confidentiality and appropriate reporting requirements. These trainings can be provided either from internal or external sources. Training should happen on an annual basis. It should be made clear to all residential staff how reports will be made.
Complainants' confidentiality should be respected at all times with no information that identifies the complainant being reported without his/her consent. Residential assistants have the responsibility to ensure safety whenever possible in the residence halls. Part of that responsibility is providing supports and information to our students. While it is not a
mandate that our students use these supports, RAs must be skilled in providing such information or referrals whenever appropriate. RAs are required to report sexual assault, sexual misconduct, sexual exploitation, or other sexual offenses as per the Campus Security Act of 1998 (Clery Act). All reports should be made to the resident administrator who then reports to the associate director of residence life who will notify campus police.

15. STUDENT HEALTH SERVICES

15.1 At this time UNCP's Student Health Center does not have Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANEs) on staff. If a student comes into the Student Health Center who has been sexually assaulted, the nurse on duty will assess the situation and refer to Southeastern Regional Medical Center for a full rape evaluation as needed. Follow-up services may be provided through student health services if necessary.

16. INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE/SEXUAL ASSAULT RESPONSE TEAM (IV-SART)

16.1 The Interpersonal Violence/Sexual Assault Response Team (IV-SART) consists of departments who serve as responsive resources for faculty and staff on campus, as supportive liaisons and advocates for students as they seek campus and community services, and/or legal intervention after an assault. The IV-SART provides assistance to victims of sexual assault, harassment, dating violence, and stalking. Assistance includes counseling, advocacy, medical care, and resource referrals to both the Rape Crisis Center and Southeastern Family Violence Center. Upon contact with a victim, IV-SART members will:

16.1.a. provide a safe place to be heard, where an individual will not be judged;

16.1.b. offer information about resources that the victim might use to address personal, medical, psychological, and safety concerns related to the incident;

16.1.c. provide guidance on procedures to be followed and resources to be contacted;

16.1.d. offer to make initial contacts with resource providers and to introduce the victim to appropriate contact people, both on and off campus, if the victim prefers;

16.1.e. serve as a liaison with other members of IV-SART who may share more extensive knowledge of particular resources for the victim; and,

16.1.f. work to ensure a coordinated, timely, and appropriate support system.

16.2 The Interpersonal Violence/Sexual Assault Response Team evaluates the UNC Pembroke campus climate regarding violence/sexual assault and makes recommendations regarding procedures for prevention, reporting, discipline, and support. The committee will foster a climate that minimizes sexual assault and interpersonal violence incidents, which impact the UNC Pembroke community and promote a supportive environment where complainants and respondents are treated according to established campus policies. UNC Pembroke strives to create a climate that encourages complainants to report incidents of violence without fear; establish sexual assault prevention training and awareness programs to educate students; offer sensitive and comprehensive treatment to restore complainants' health and wellbeing; help leaders understand their roles and responsibilities regarding response to sexual assault complainants, thoroughly investigate allegations of sexual assault, and take appropriate
administrative and disciplinary action; and, conduct sensitivity training for members of the interpersonal violence/sexual assault response team, so that re-victimization is minimized, to train advocates to assist victim/survivors with crisis intervention and to reduce complainants' stress resulting from assault. The IV-SART works closely with existing community resources to maximize utilization of service. IV-SART assists students in being referred to the Robeson County Rape Crisis Center as well as Southeastern Family Violence Center when hospital transport and additional advocacy services are needed. IV-SART will rely on these existing resources to continue their current work of advocacy in the event of an assault. IV-SART also utilizes existing therapeutic services at UNCP's Counseling and Testing Center to refer all victims for appropriate counseling.

16.3 Members of the IV-SART team will include: director of student health services; director of counseling and testing; representative(s) from campus police; director, international students; outreach coordinator; director of student conduct; vice chancellor for student affairs or designee; associate vice chancellor for campus safety and emergency operations; and, the director of human resources and various other faculty and staff members willing to be trained to provide victim response.


Sexual Harassment

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 Sexual harassment is any unwelcome physical or verbal conduct of a sexual nature which interferes with another's ability to receive an education or work. Harassment on the basis of sex is a violation of Section 703 of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (amended in 1972). It is further interpreted to be a form of sex discrimination prohibited by North Carolina General Statute §126-16 and Title IX - Education Amendments of 1972. Title VII is enforced by the U.S. Equal Employment Commission and Title IX is enforced by the Office for Civil Rights in the U.S. Department of Education. Consequently, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke will not tolerate sexual harassment of its students, faculty, or employees.

1.2 Sexual harassment at UNCP will be grounds for disciplinary action up to, and including, termination of employment or student status.

2. HARASSING BEHAVIORS

2.1 The following actions may be considered sexually harassing behavior:

2.1.a. unwanted sexual advances, propositions, or questions;

2.1.b. unwelcome touching of a person's body or clothing;

2.1.c. public displays of sexually demeaning objects, photographs, posters, or cartoons
in a manner that is intended to interfere with work or education;

2.1.d. implied or overt threats, or punitive action as the result of rejection of sexual advances or rejection of romantic involvement; and

2.1.e. sexual assault.

3. REPORT VIOLATIONS

3.1 Victims of sexual harassment should either contact campus police or present the information in writing to the director of student conduct. Complaints against UNCP students will be governed by the procedures stated in Chapter IV., Rights & Responsibilities. Student complaints against UNCP faculty or staff will be governed by the procedures stated in the UNCP Student Grievance Policy. Members of the university community are prohibited from acts of reprisal against individuals who bring complaints or are involved as witnesses in any action connected with this policy.


Student Grievance Policy

1. PURPOSE

1.1 The objectives of this grievance process for students are to ensure that students have the opportunity to present a grievance to the university regarding a certain action or inaction by a member of the university community and to ensure that the university has a consistent process of resolving those grievances in a fair and just manner.

1.2 A student may pursue a grievance if he or she believes a university employee (including faculty, staff, student employees, and agents—hereafter, referred to only as the "employee") has violated his or her rights. This grievance process for students applies to all problems arising out of interactions between a student and a member of the university community that are not governed by other specific grievance proceedings (e.g., undergraduate grade appeals, residency appeals, traffic appeals, etc.).

1.3 Throughout the grievance process, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs will provide guidance about the policy's procedures and requirements. The UNCP Office of the General Counsel will provide training at the beginning of each academic year. Once a formal complaint has been filed with the appropriate vice chancellor, the UNCP Office of the General Counsel is to be immediately notified. Once notified, the general counsel will provide advice and counsel to the hearing panel throughout the grievance process with the objective of providing and assuring due process for all parties and the development of a complete and judicially sound hearing report to be given to the vice chancellor or senior administrator.

1.4 A grievance which is found to be intentionally dishonest or willfully disregards the truth is a violation of the UNCP Student Code of Conduct, specifically, furnishing false information to the university with intent to deceive. Students violating this code will be subject to disciplinary action. Any retaliation directed to the grievant as a result of the filing of a grievance is against state and federal laws and UNCP policy.

2. WHAT MAY BE GRIEVED

2.1 An action or decision may be grieved only if it involves a violation of university policy or public law. Grievances may not be used to challenge policies or procedures of general applicability. In addition, this process may not be used to grieve:

2.1.a. claims based on purchases or contracts;

2.1.b. claims against an employee on matters that are unrelated to the employee's job or role at the university; and

2.1.c. decisions covered by other university policies (e.g. residency appeals).

3. INFORMAL RESOLUTION

3.1 The informal resolution process is designed to reach an understanding of the situation and to resolve the differences in an informal and cooperative manner. While the vice chancellor for student affairs (or his/her designee) will discuss the steps involved in the informal resolution process to the grievant, neither step 1 nor step 2 is mandatory. Neither the student nor the employee is obligated to participate in either step 1 or step 2 and may refuse the offer of an informal resolution/mediation of the grievance matter.

3.2 Step 1. The student with a grievance against a member of the university community is encouraged to meet with the employee. The purpose of the meeting is to reach a mutual understanding of the student's situation and the employee's actions and attempt a resolution of the grievance matter. The student has seven (7) calendar days from the incident or the date the student should have known about the incident to initiate this discussion.

3.3 Step 2. If the meeting with the employee is not satisfactory, does not occur, or if it is impractical for the student to meet with the employee, the student should request the assistance of the employee's immediate supervisor. This request to the employee's immediate supervisor must occur within 7 calendar days of the meeting with the employee or within 14 calendar days of the incident. The purpose of this intervention is for the immediate supervisor to attempt to work with both parties to reach a resolution to the grievance matter.

4. FORMAL RESOLUTION

4.1. Step 3. If an informal resolution is not successful, the student may file a formal grievance by sending a written request for a hearing to the appropriate vice chancellor or senior administrator with supervisory authority over the person(s) named in the grievance. The student must file this within 14 calendar days of the meeting with the immediate supervisor or having received a refusal by the employee to meet with his/her immediate supervisor and the student.

4.2 All grievance complaints must be in writing and signed by the student. The grievance must contain:

4.2.a. a clear and precise statement of the complaint;

4.2.b. state how the decision or action is unfair and harmful to the student and list the university policies or state and federal laws that have been violated, if known;

4.2.c. name the respondent parties (the person(s) against whom the grievance is filed);

4.2.d. state how each respondent is responsible for the action or decision;

4.2.e. state the requested remedy;

4.2.f. state whether any witnesses will be brought to the hearing;

4.2.g. state whether a non-participating observer will be brought to the hearing; and

4.2.h. sign the Grievance Formal Statement of Authenticity Form.

4.3 Dismissal of Grievance Complaint by Vice Chancellor or Senior Administrator

4.3.1. If it is clear on the face of the written grievance, that it has not been filed according to this process (such as, but not limited to, time frame, matter is not grievable under this process, the complaint is frivolous in the vice chancellor or senior administrator's judgment, or is from a person without grievance rights under this process), the vice chancellor or senior administrator shall dismiss the complaint and state with reason(s) in a letter to the grievant.

4.3.2. If the grievance complaint is not dismissed by the vice chancellor or senior administrator, then within 14 calendar days of receiving the grievance complaint he/she shall refer the grievance to the chair of the Student Grievance Committee, from which a fact-finding hearing panel will be appointed. The vice chancellor or senior administrator will inform the employee in writing that a grievance has been received and that the matter has been referred to the Student Grievance Committee.

4.4 Composition of the Student Grievance Committee

4.4.1 The members of the Student Grievance Committee shall be appointed by the chancellor and serve at the pleasure of the chancellor, who will also name the chair of the committee. In the event any person appointed to the committee is unable to serve, the chancellor may appoint another to serve in his/her place. The composition of the Student Grievance Committee shall be made up of three faculty members (nominated by the Faculty Senate), three staff members (nominated by the Staff Council), and four upper classmen and/or graduate student members (two SGA representatives and two nominated by SGA).

4.4.2 For the purpose of each grievance, the chair of the committee will select four members of the committee to serve with him/her as the hearing panel. In addition to the chair of the committee, the hearing panel shall include two students, one faculty member, and one staff member. The faculty and staff member cannot be part of the same office or immediate
administrative unit as the respondent/employee . Hearing panel members should have no personal interest in the outcome of the process, and should not have any personal involvement in earlier stages of the grievance matter. The chair may designate another member of the committee to serve as the fifth member of the hearing panel when the chair is unavailable to serve due to emergencies or conflict of interest. A decision of the panel will be considered a decision of the committee.

4.4.3 The hearing panel members, parties, and all persons involved in the grievance process shall maintain strict confidentiality regarding the grievance matter during all stages of this process. There should be no ex parte communication between the parties and the grievance committee/hearing panel members concerning the case. State and federal laws govern the privacy rights of students and employees. Any questions about the disclosure of information should be directed to the hearing panel in writing and the panel should consult with the Office of the General Counsel.

4.4.4 Step 4: The chair of the committee shall convene the hearing panel within 7 calendar days of receiving the complaint and provide them with the written complaint and all supporting documents provided by both parties. The chair of the committee will be responsible for facilitating the work of the hearing panel and shall schedule the hearing within 14 calendar days of his/her receipt of the complaint.

4.4.5 The chair of the hearing panel shall notify the parties of a hearing date, time, and place at least five (5) calendar days in advance of the hearing. During a hearing, the grievant and the accused shall have the following rights:

4.4.5.a. the right to have a non-participating observer present;

4.4.5.b. the right to present the testimony of witnesses and other evidence, relevant to the grievance;

4.4.5.c. the right to confront and cross-examine witnesses; and

4.4.5.d. the right to examine all submitted documents and other evidence.

4.5 Other Hearing Protocol

4.5.1 The hearing panel may request testimony and/or evidence from relevant witnesses.

4.5.2 The vice chancellor for student affairs will appoint a neutral party (non-hearing panel member) to observe the proceeding, offer procedural advice as needed, and act as the official audio recorder (authorized recording number 1).

4.5.3 The chair of the hearing panel will appoint a hearing panel member to also record (authorized recording number 2) the hearing and another grievance committee member not serving on the hearing panel to take official notes.

4.5.4 Both the authorized recordings and the official notes are for the hearing panel's use in deliberation and should be held in strict confidence. No other audio recordings are to be made.

4.5.5 At the discretion of the chair, and upon the advice of general counsel, campus security may be present for the hearing.

4.6 Summer and Fast Track Review

4.6.1 At the discretion of the vice chancellor for student affairs (or his/her designee) the grievance may be decided by the fast track process. If the vice chancellor for student affairs (or his/her designee) offers the student the fast track process, the student may elect to waive his/her right to a committee hearing. In the fast track process, the appropriate vice chancellor or senior administrator shall serve as the fact finder and conduct the hearing in the place of the hearing panel. The vice chancellor or senior administrator's decision will be final with the student having the right to file an appeal to the chancellor as outlined below in section 6.

4.6.2 Every grievance filed after April 15 and before August 25 of each year shall be decided through the fast track review and the grievant shall have no right to a committee hearing.

5. THE DECISION

5.1 After hearing a student grievance, the hearing panel shall determine, by majority vote, whether to recommend a finding that the preponderance of the evidence shows that the employee has violated the law or policy at issue. Within 14 calendar days of the hearing, the hearing panel shall provide a written report to the vice chancellor or senior administrator who received the complaint. The report should include a summary of the proceeding, finding of fact, recommendations, a copy of all correspondence with the parties, all evidence submitted to the panel, the recording or transcript of the hearing, and anything else considered by the panel in reaching its recommendation. A dissenting panel member may also file a minority report at this time.

5.2 The vice chancellor or senior administrator shall review the official report of the hearing panel and issue a written decision within 14 calendar days of receiving the hearing panel's report. In the decision, the vice chancellor or senior administrator may either adopt the hearing panel report and recommendations in whole, modify it in part, or reject the report and reach different findings or conclusions for reasons expressly stated. The decision should be sent, subject to UNCP personnel policies and state and federal law, to all parties via certified mail, return receipt requested, within 14 calendar days.

6. THE APPEAL

6.1 The student who filed the initial grievance and the employee may appeal the decision of the vice chancellor or senior administrator to the chancellor within 14 calendar days of receiving the written decision. The chancellor, upon receiving the grievance appeal, may adopt the vice chancellor's/senior administrator's decision in whole, modify it in part, or reject the report and reach different findings or conclusions. The chancellor's decision shall be final and sent, subject to UNCP personnel policies and state and federal law, to all parties via certified mail, return receipt requested.

6.2 For grievances against vice chancellors, the chancellor (or his/her designee) will make decisions based on the hearing panel's report and recommendation and may adopt the report and recommendations in whole, modify it in part, or reject the report and reach different findings or conclusions. The chancellor's decision shall be final and sent, subject to UNCP personnel policies and state and federal law, to all parties via certified mail, return receipt requested.

6.3 Once the grievance matter is closed, all evidence used in the case, to include but not be limited to, documents and audio recordings, are to be placed in the custody of the vice chancellor for student affairs for three years.

  • Academic Support Services Subcommittee
  • Committee on Substance Abuse Prevention (CSAP)
  • Board of Trustees
  • Campus Appeal Board (CAB)
  • Campus Judicial Board (CJB)
  • Curriculum Subcommittee
  • Enrollment Management Subcommittee
  • Facilities Master Plan Committee
  • Faculty Athletic Committee
  • Faculty Awards Committee
  • Givens Performing Arts Center Advisory Board
  • Graduate Council
  • Planning and Budget Review
  • Physical Environment Committee
  • Student Affairs and Campus Life Committee
  • Student Grievance Panel
  • Student Publications Board
  • Traffic Appeals Board
  • Traffic Control Board
  • Tuition & Student Fee Committee


UNC PEMBROKE GRIEVANCE PROCESS FOR STUDENTS DENIED REASONABLE ACCOMMODATIONS OR SUBJECTED TO DISCRIMINATION BECAUSE OF A DISABILITY

1. PURPOSE
1.1 Students with disabilities are responsible for contacting Disability Support Services if reasonable accommodations are not implemented in an effective or timely manner. Disability Support Services works with faculty, staff, and students with disabilities to resolve disagreements regarding recommended accommodations. The Complaint, Grievance Hearing, and Appeals Process, as outlined below, will facilitate an internal informal and formal basis for filing a complaint, conducting a grievance hearing, and finally, appealing a denial of accommodations and for grieving instances of inappropriate discrimination in violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act Amendments Act (“ADAAA”) or Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 (“Section 504”).

1.2 Any student with a disability who believes he or she has been discriminated against on the basis of that disability may use this process to file a grievance with the ADAAA Grievance Officer who is the Director of Disability Support Services, DF Lowry, Room 107, at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke, or if the grievance is against Disability Support Services with the Assistant Vice-Chancellor of Student Academic Services and Retention in DF Lowry, Room 308, who will serve as the ADAAA grievance officer, or with the Office of Civil Rights.

1.3 A student may pursue a grievance if he or she believes that a university employee (including faculty, staff, and agents--hereafter, referred to as “employee”) has discriminated against the student because of his/her disability or has improperly denied the student a reasonable accommodation. Upon request from any student, the Director of Disability Support Services, as the ADAAA grievance officer, will provide guidance about the appropriate process for redress of a particular complaint.

1.4 Throughout the grievance process, the ADAAA grievance officer will provide guidance about the policy’s procedures and requirements. The UNCP Office of Legal Affairs, as legal counsel for the ADAAA Student Grievance Committee and the Hearing Panel, will provide training at the beginning of each academic year. Once a formal complaint has been filed with the ADAAA grievance officer, the UNCP Office of Legal Affairs is to be notified immediately. Once notified, Legal Affairs will provide advice and counsel to the Hearing Panel throughout the Grievance Process with the objective of providing and assuring due process for all parties and the development of a complete and judicially sound Hearing Report to be submitted to the appropriate vice chancellor.

1.5 A grievance which is found to be intentionally dishonest or willfully disregards the truth is a violation of the UNCP Student Code of Conduct, item 2a) Furnishing false information to the university with intent to deceive. Students violating this code will be subject to disciplinary action.

1.6 The university prohibits retaliation against any student for filing, or participating in, a grievance under this process. Any retaliation directed to the complainant or witness as a result of the filing of a grievance under this process is against state and federal laws and UNCP Policy.

View complete policy at www.uncp.edu/dss/policies or www.uncp.edu/sa/pol_pub

Academic Regulations

Click the following link to access that section of the Student Handbook:

 

Class Time Schedule

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
8:00-8:50 8:00-9:15 8:00-8:50 8:00-9:15 8:00-8:50
9:05-9:55 9:30-10:45 9:05-9:55 9:30-10:45 9:05-9:55
10:10-11:00 11:00-12:15 10:10-11:00 11:00-12:15 10:10-11:00
11:15-12:05 12:30-1:45 11:15-12:05 12:30-1:45 11:15-12:05
12:20-1:10 2:00-3:15 12:20-1:10 2:00-3:15 12:20-1:10
1:25-2:15 3:30-4:45 1:25-2:15 3:30-4:45 1:25-2:15
2:30-3:20   2:30-3:20   2:30-3:20
3:35-4:25   3:35-4:25   3:35-4:25
5:00-5:50 5:00-6:15 5:00-5:50 5:00-6:15 5:00-5:50
6:30-9:30 6:30-9:30 6:30-9:30 6:30-9:30 6:30-9:30

 

  • *Classes that meet on Monday and Friday follow the Tuesday and Thursday schedule.
  • *Classes meeting three days per week, meet for 50 minutes each session.
  • *Classes meeting twice per week meet for 75 minutes each session.
  • *Evening classes that meet one day a week Monday through Friday, meet for three hours.

Abbreviations used to designate days are as follows: M=Monday, T=Tuesday,

W=Wednesday, R=Thursday, F=Friday, S=Saturday, U=Sunday.


Classification of Students

Regular students at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke are classified according to the number of semester hours they have earned in keeping with the following table:

Less than 30 hours – Freshman

30 to 59 hours – Sophomore

60 to 89 hours – Junior

90 hours to graduation – Senior


Academic Advisement

The University has an academic advising system to assist students in their respective academic programs. Each student is assigned to a faculty member who helps the student plan a program and maintains a record of progress during his or her college career. Although the advisor will guide the student in academic matters, the final responsibility for meeting all academic program requirements rests with the student.

The academic advisor may refer a student to other offices for further services in counseling, career planning and placement, tutoring and skills development.


Grading and Academic Eligibility

Grading System

Grade reports are viewed online by all students. A BraveWeb user ID and password must be maintained by all students.

A letter grade and plus-minus system for evaluating academic performance is used for evaluating all undergraduate students. Each letter grade has a quality point value for each semester hour it represents. The hours and quality points are used in determining a student's quality point average for a semester's work and in averaging grades for all work completed to find a student's cumulative quality point average.

Academic eligibility for a student shall be determined by current regulations.

The letter grades and quality points represented by each, as of January 1, 1989, are as follows:

  • A = 4.0
  • A- = 3.7
  • B+ = 3.3
  • B = 3.0
  • B- = 2.7
  • C+ = 2.3
  • C = 2.0
  • C- = 1.7
  • D+ = 1.3
  • D = 1.0
  • D- = 0.7
  • F = 0.0
  • P = 0.0
  • I = 0.0
  • T = 0.0
  • W or WX= 0.0
  • AU = 0.0

The P grade is earned in designated courses and carries semester hours credit. However, the hours are not counted in quality hours. Quality hours are the hours used in figuring quality point averages.

The I, or incomplete grade, is given when a student is unable to complete required work because of an unavoidable circumstance such as illness. It is not to be given to enable a student to do additional work to improve a grade. An incomplete must be removed within one semester (excluding summer term) or it will automatically be converted to a grade of F by the University Registrar. In the determination of quality hours and quality point averages, an I is counted as an F until it is removed.

The T, grade pending, is given only for University Honors College courses until the thesis or project is completed.

The W or WX, grade is assigned when a student withdraws from a course during the designated drop period.

Audited classes are listed on the permanent record. They are designated by the letters AU. The AUs and W's will be listed as attempted hours, but not as quality hours for figuring quality point averages.


Undergraduate Grade Appeal Process

Undergraduate students may appeal a final course grade. The appeal process must be initiated by the student within thirty (30) calendar days after the first day of class of the regular semester following the award of the grade. The appeal process is summarized below.

Step 1

An undergraduate student who wishes to appeal a final course grade must first attempt to resolve the matter by meeting with the instructor involved. The student must explain his or her position to the instructor and attempt to understand the justification for the grade assigned by the instructor. The purpose of the meeting is to reach a mutual understanding of the student's situation and the instructor's actions and to resolve differences in an informal and cooperative manner.

Step 2

If a student fails to reach a satisfactory solution in consultation with the instructor, or if it is impractical to consult with the instructor, the student should seek the assistance of the Faculty Conciliator within fifteen (15) calendar days of the meeting with the instructor or within thirty (30) calendar days after the first day of class of the semester following the award of the grade. The Faculty Conciliator's role is to advise, guide, and document the student's progress through the Appeal Process.

Step 3

Within five (5) calendar days of the initial meeting with the student, the Conciliator must arrange a meeting with the student, the instructor, and the chairperson of the department. The purpose of this meeting is to try to find an amicable solution. In the case of a grade appeal involving a department chairperson, the meeting will be with the student, the instructor (chairperson) and a Vice Chancellor of Academic Affairs (Provost or Associate). If the student is still dissatisfied after this meeting, such student may then elect to file a formal appeal within fifteen (15) calendar days of the meeting.

Step 4

To file a formal appeal, the student must submit a written appeal statement to the Conciliator who will forward it to the Chairperson of the CJB. The written appeal must be specific, relevant, and concise, explaining precisely the student's justification for the grade appeal. The burden of proof will be on the student, to the extent reasonable, to clearly document pertinent evidence for the grade appeal (i.e., a copy of the syllabus; copies of graded exams and term papers as well as other substantiating evidence). The student should also provide a list requesting copies of items used for evaluation that cannot be directly documented (e.g., a professor may keep copies of old exams).

Step 5

The CJB has authority to screen out frivolous or unsubstantiated claims. The Chairperson will notify the Conciliator, the faculty member, the student and the departmental chairperson (or Vice Chancellor) in writing, explaining why the committee found a student claim sufficient or insufficient and, in the event of a sufficient claim, of the date of the appeal hearing.

Step 6

The Chairperson of the CJB shall convene a meeting of the board at least once a semester, unless no sufficient appeals are forthcoming. In a closed hearing, the student shall produce documents and other relevant evidence to substantiate his or her claims. The student may address only those issues that are described in the appeal statement. Claims the CJB has deemed frivolous or unsubstantiated may not be addressed. The instructor shall be given an opportunity to respond and discuss the concerns raised by the student. The CJB may ask questions of all parties and will deliberate after hearing the case. Two faculty members and two student members must vote in concurrence with the student's position in order for the appeal to be supported. The Board shall issue its decision within seven (7) calendar days of the hearing.

Step 7

Once the CJB reaches its decision, the following persons will be notified in writing about the findings of the Board: the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, the chairperson in the appropriate department, the faculty member, the Conciliator, and the student.

If the Board finds the original course grade to be inappropriate, the Board will recommend that the faculty member recalculate the grade and make the appropriate change in the Registrar's Office within five (5) calendar days. Should the faculty member be unwilling or unable to do so, the Board will recalculate the grade and make the change in the Registrar's Office.

The resulting grade is final and may not be further appealed.

Faculty Conciliator

The Faculty Conciliator will be chosen by the Student Government Association from a list of four names of the full-time teaching faculty approved by the Faculty Senate and submitted by the Chair of the Faculty Senate. The S.G.A. will also select one of the nominees from a different department than the Conciliator to serve as an alternate should the circumstances of a specific situation make involvement of the primary Conciliator impractical. Both the Conciliator and the alternate will serve one-year terms. The Faculty Conciliator shall be an ex officio, nonvoting member of the CJB in final grade appeals deliberations. Students should call the Office of Student Affairs at 910-521-6226 to receive contact information on the Faculty Conciliator.

Campus Judicial Board (CJB)

The CJB is defined in the UNCP Student Handbook. CJB members are necessarily excluded from deliberations in which:

  1. The board member is related to one of the two principals.
  2. The board member is a departmental colleague of one of the principals.
  3. The board member is currently enrolled in a course taught by one of the principals.
  4. The board member is one of the two principals involved.

All questions of scheduling and satisfying deadlines shall be adjudicated by the Chairperson of the CJB.

All records of the Board's deliberations shall be kept in a file maintained by the Office of Academic Affairs in accordance with the University Records Retention and Disposition Schedule.

Nothing in this policy should be construed as a violation of academic freedom expressed in The Code of The University of North Carolina.


Auditing

All persons, whether regularly enrolled in the University or not, who desire to audit a course must secure the permission of the instructor and the Office for Academic Affairs. The fee charged for auditing a course will be the same as if the course were taken for credit. The decision to audit must be made by the late registration date. No audits may be added after this date.

For non-matriculating students, a copy of the receipt of payment from the Cashier's Office must be filed with the instructor at the beginning of the course. Students who are regularly enrolled at the University must file a copy of the permission letter from the Office for Academic Affairs with the instructor at the beginning of the course.


Course Load

Students are expected to enroll in at least 15-16 semester hours credit per term so that it is possible for them to graduate in four years (eight semesters).

Full-time students must carry at least 12 semester hours each semester. The maximum load is 18 semester hours except as follows: students who are on the Honors List may take up to 19 semester hours; students who are on the Chancellor's List may take up to 21 semester hours; Summer session students may carry no more than 3 semester hours during Maymester, no more than 7 semester hours during Summer I, and no more than 7 semester hours during Summer II.  

The number of semester hours required to graduate from UNCP is between 120 and 128 in accordance with specific program degree requirements. In order to graduate in 4 years (8 semesters), it is necessary to take (and pass) more than 15 semester hours for each of the 8 semesters. If a student's major requires more than 120 semester hours, the student must take (and pass) more than 15 semester hours for each of the 8 semesters. Students must work with their advisors and their major departments to ensure that they follow the scheduling sequence of required courses for their majors.

All course work counts toward a student's course load whether the student is enrolled for credit or as an audit at this or another institution.


Quality Point Average and Academic Standing

Academic standing at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is based on the quality point average. To figure compute point average, multiply the number of quality hours (attempted hours minus P credits, AUs, and W's) assigned to each course by the number of quality points received; then add the quality points received for all courses, and divide by the number of quality hours.

Example:

Course Final Course Grade Quality Hours times Quality Points equals Quality Points Earned
Course A C+ 3 x 2.3 = 6.9
Course B B- 3 x 2.7 = 8.1
Course C A 1 x 4.0 = 4.0
Course D P 0 x 0.0 = 0.0
Course E F 1 x 0.0 = 0.0
Course F B 3 x 3.0 = 9.0
Course G A- 3 x 3.7 = 11.1
Course H I 2 x 0.0 = 0.0
Total Quality Hours= 16 Total Quality Points = 39.1

 

Quality Point Average = 39.1 divided by 16 = 2.44

*A grade of P counts as hours earned but not as quality hours and is computed as 0 hours in figuring quality point averages.

A cumulative quality point average is obtained by including in the quality point average calculation the quality hours and the quality points received from The University of North Carolina at Pembroke only.


Academic Standing

A student’s academic standing during any term is determined by the cumulative grade point average (GPA) earned on the total quality hours.  To be in good standing, a cumulative GPA of 2.0 and a 67% or greater earned-to-attempted pass rate must be maintained.  Individuals with less than a cumulative 2.0 GPA or less than a 67% earned-to-attempted pass rate are placed on either probation or suspension.    

Students are advised of their academic status at the end of every semester via email, Braveweb, and mail sent to their address of record.  It is the student’s responsibility to know his/her academic standing status and to ensure that an accurate mailing address is on file with the Registrar.


Academic Probation

Continuing Students:  A continuing student is placed on Academic Probation when his/her cumulative GPA falls below 2.0 or the earned-to-attempted pass rate falls below 67%  at the end of any term (fall/spring/summer).

Students on academic probation are eligible to attend the University under specified provisions but are not in good standing.  Enrollment for the probationary term will be limited to a maximum of 13 semester hours.  At the end of the probationary term, students must achieve one of the following:

1.       Raise the cumulative GPA to a minimum of 2.0, or

2.       Earn a minimum GPA of 2.3 on at least 12 semester hours, excluding UNV 1000 and PE activity courses, for the probationary term.

Failure to meet one of the conditions above will result in suspension from UNCP for one semester.  Students continue on probation as long as their earned-to-attempted pass rate remains below 67%.

First Semester Freshmen and Transfer Students:In addition to the requirements above, first-semester freshmen and first-semester transfer students who earn between 1.5 and 1.99 at the end of their first semester are placed on probation for one term and must meet the following to continue:

1.      

Develop a Success Contract with a member of the Center for Academic Excellence and adhere to guidelines established.

2.      

Meet monthly with their academic advisors.

3.      

Attend a minimum of three academic success seminars offered by the Center for Academic Success.

First-semester freshmen and first-semester transfer students who earn between 1.5 and 1.99 and are placed on probation must agree to participate in the above activities during the second semester or they are ineligible to return to UNCP for one semester. Additionally, these students must earn a minimum GPA of 2.3 or achieve good academic standing status at the end of the second term.  Failure to meet one of these criteria will result in a one-semester suspension.


Academic Suspension

Continuing Students:If a continuing student does not meet the above GPA requirement(s) during the probationary semester, he/she will be suspended for one semester and can apply for readmission after the suspension semester (see Registrar’s Website).   

Following an initial suspension of one semester and being readmitted to the University on probation, failure to meet the GPA requirements at the end of the semester will result in a suspension for two semesters.  After two semesters, the student may apply for readmission to UNCP (see Registrar’s Website). 

Students failing to meet the GPA requirements for continuation after the second suspension and readmission to UNCP will be suspended from the University for a minimum of three academic years.  

NOTE: From time to time, students on suspension enroll at another institution to strengthen academic and study skills.  While this can be a very beneficial use of the suspension semester, no credits earned while on suspension are transferrable to UNCP when readmitted.

First Semester Freshmen and Transfer Students: First-semester freshmen and first-semester transfers earning less than a 1.5 at the end of the first term of enrollment are placed on suspension and are ineligible to return to the University for one semester.  They can apply for readmission after the suspension semester (see Registrar’s Website).  If readmitted, students will return on academic probation.


Suspension Appeals

A student who wishes to appeal his/her suspension must appeal to the Suspension Appeals Committee at least five (5) work days prior to the first day of classes of the semester for which enrollment is sought.  Specific deadlines for each term can be found on the appeals form on the Web sites of the Academic Support Center and the office of Financial Aid.  Appeals are coordinated by the staff of the Academic Support Center.   Individuals wishing to appeal a suspension should contact the Center to schedule a meeting with a counselor to develop an appeals packet.  Complete appeals packets include, at a minimum, letter of appeal, Success Contract, supporting documents of personal/medical reasons for performance, and statement of strategies/support programs that will be utilized during the semester to attain good academic standing status.  No appeals will be heard if received after the deadline, and the decision of the Suspension Appeals Committee is final.


Esther G. Maynor Honors College

The Esther G. Maynor Honors College (MHC) recognizes and promotes scholarly and personal growth of academically accomplished students. The MHC learning community includes interdisciplinary seminars within the General Education curriculum, a leadership program, cultural, service and social opportunities as well as faculty-led research opportunities. MHC students may elect to live in shared residential facilities. The MHC offers an intellectually stimulating environment with greater curricular flexibility and closer interaction with individual faculty. Honors students are encouraged to consider study abroad opportunities and to pursue graduate education. Students interested in the MHC should contact the Dean of the Honors College at honors@uncp.edu.


Academic Honors

Graduation with Honors

Graduating seniors may be considered for honors if they have earned a Quality Point Average (QPA) of at least 3.4 for 45 semester hours of course work in residence at UNCP. All course work attempted (including quality hours from other institutions and repeated hours) will be included in the calculation of the cumulative QPA for determining the particular honors designation awarded. Students who attain a cumulative QPA of 3.85 or higher are graduated summa cum laude. Those who achieve a minimum cumulative QPA of 3.70 are graduated magna cum laude and students whose cumulative QPA is at least 3.40 are graduated cum laude.

Students who achieve the hours and the QPA requirement at the beginning of the last semester of their senior year will be recognized at commencement. The final assessment is done after graduation and honors are pending for all students until this is completed. The honors designation will appear on the student's diploma and transcript.

Honors/Chancellor's List

Students are eligible for Honors List if they achieve a minimum semester quality point average of 3.2 while passing at least 12 semester hours of course work, of which none must be Pass/Fail.

Students are eligible for Chancellor's List if they achieve a minimum semester quality point average of 3.7 while passing at least 12 semester hours of course work, of which none must be Pass/Fail.


Registration Procedures and Policies

Advisement and Registration

Each student must complete registration online. No student is considered to be officially registered until the student has completed registration as outlined below. Students who fail to complete registration as prescribed will have their names dropped from all class rolls. If these students subsequently request to register, they must follow registration procedures just as if they had not started registration before.

The advisor's role is to assist the student in planning a suitable academic program. However, the students are responsible for following all academic regulations that are applicable to their course of study. This includes general education requirements, pre-requisites and major/minor requirements. Students are individually responsible for all course registrations and for completing the requirements for graduation. The Office of the Registrar will drop students who register for courses without following departmental or university regulations. Each student must register online prior to the first day of class. After the drop-add period, each student must register in person in the Office of the Registrar.

The University has a two-phase registration system: the early registration phase and the regular registration phase.

Students currently enrolled at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke may complete their registration by: (1) consulting with their advisor during the designated early registration period, (2) registering for the approved course work online, and (4) paying tuition and fees to the Cashier's Office or through the student's online account center on Braveweb.

Students entering UNCP for the first time or returning after an absence of two semesters (one year) or more may complete their registration by: (1) consulting with their advisor during the designated registration period and preparing their class schedule for the semester, (2) registering for the approved course work online, and (3) paying tuition and fees at the Cashier's Office or through the student's online account center in Braveweb.


Adding, Dropping, and Withdrawing from Courses

After a student has completed registration the only way the student’s schedule can be changed is through the drop-add procedure. To add a course a student must obtain a Course Add Form from an academic department, complete the form, have it approved by his or her advisor, obtain the signature of the gaining professor, and present the form to the Office of the Registrar.  To drop a course a student must obtain a Course Withdrawal Form from an academic department, complete the form, have it approved by his or her advisor, and present the form to the Office of the Registrar.

A student may withdraw from a course after the drop-add period but prior to and including the last day of the first week of classes after midterm grades are reported, with a grade of W, if the student obtains the signature of her or his advisor and instructor. Students entering UNCP as freshmen will have the option of withdrawing from a maximum of 15 semester hours of coursework.  No student is eligible to withdraw from more than 15 hours of credit regardless of his/her entry date.

A student who transfers to UNCP may not withdraw from more than the maximum number of hours of coursework as determined by the table below during his/her undergraduate career at UNCP.  After a student has withdrawn from the maximum allowed number of credit hours, any subsequent withdrawal will result automatically in a grade of “F.”  These limits apply only to the Fall and Spring semester courses, not to Summer session courses.

Transfer Hours Maximum Withdrawal Hours
0-23 15
24-51 12
52-89 9
90 or more hours 6
Candidate for second Bachelor's degree 6

The Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment may approve withdrawal from a course or courses at any time without academic penalty if serious extenuating circumstances, such as serious illness, exist.  Unsatisfactory academic performance does not by itself constitute an extenuating circumstance.  As soon as possible, the student petitioning to withdraw from a course due to extenuating circumstances must meet with the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment, present the appropriate medical or legal documentation, and complete the necessary forms.  Approved requests receive a grade of WX. In addition, the following conditions apply:

 

                     i.           

a WX will be recorded on the transcript;

                    ii.           

the course(s) will count as attempted hours;

                   iii.           

the course(s) will not count in tuition surcharge calculations;

                   iv.           

the course(s) will not count in GPA calculation;

                    v.           

the course(s) are subject to all Financial Aid and SAP rules and calculations.

Students denied a request for the grade of WX may appeal to the Provost or designee whose decision will be final.

Permission to Take a Course as a Visitor at Another University

Students who wish to enroll in courses at other institutions to apply toward a degree at UNCP must adhere to the following policies:

  1. Have written approval from their UNCP advisor.
  2. Have written approval from their Advisor or UNCP Department Chair if the course is part of their major curriculum.
  3. Have written approval from the UNCP Registrar.
  4. Have a minimum QPA of 2.0.
  5. Be in good social standing.
  6. Have an official transcript submitted to the UNCP Office of the Registrar immediately upon completion of the course.
  7. Courses accepted for transfer credit will be evaluated in terms of UNCP's academic policies, curriculum and the student's proposed program at UNCP. Fractional credit will not be granted for partial completion of any course.
  8. Credit hours will transfer for courses in which the student earns a "C" or better. Grades earned at other institutions are not used to compute UNCP's quality point average.
  9. Permission will not be granted to repeat a course at another institution. Students may elect to repeat any course if both the original course and the repeat course are taken at UNCP.


Repetition of Courses

A student who wishes to repeat a course must adhere to the following policies:

  1. The original course and the repeat course must be taken at UNCP.
  2. The course being repeated must be the same course taken previously; no substitutions are allowed.
  3. Students may repeat a course twice. Exceptions to this limit require approval of the chair of the department offering the course and the appropriate dean.
  4. All grades received in courses repeated will be used to compute the quality point average, unless the student elects to use a grade replacement (see "Grade Replacement Policy" below).
  5. A student will receive credit (earned hours) for a course one time and the most recent grade will be used in meeting graduation requirements.
  6. All entries remain a part of the student's permanent record.


Grade Replacement Policy

Students Entering UNCP Prior to Fall 1994

Undergraduate students who entered UNCP before the fall of 1994 and who follow the repeat policy will automatically have the grade replaced for all eligible repeats. The semester hours and quality points in courses repeated are counted only once, and the most recent grade and the quality points corresponding to the most recent grade are used in computing the quality point average and meeting graduation requirements. However, all entries remain a part of the student's permanent record.

Students Entering UNCP for Fall 1994 and Thereafter

Beginning with the fall semester of 1994, undergraduate students who enter UNCP and who wish to replace a course grade must adhere to the following policies:

  1. A student must follow all regulations regarding repetition of course work.
  2. Some courses may be taken more than once for full credit; these courses are not eligible for grade replacement.
  3. The semester hours and quality points in courses repeated are counted only once, and the most recent grade and the quality points corresponding to the most recent grade are used in computing the quality point average and meeting graduation requirements.
  4. Students entering UNCP as freshmen from Fall 1994 through Spring 2013 will have the option of replacing a maximum of 15 credit hours with improved grades earned by repeating courses. Students entering UNCP as freshmen beginning in Fall 2013 will have the option of replacing a maximum of 12 credit hours with improved grades earned by repeating courses. No student is eligible for more than 15 hours of replacement credit regardless of his/her entry date.
  5. The credit hours associated with each repeated course will count toward the cumulative replacement hours.
  6. Students transferring or readmitted to UNCP may replace grades for courses taken at UNCP for a maximum number of hours as determined by the scale below, which is based on the number of hours accepted for transfer or readmission.
Transfer Hours accepted as of fall 1994 Maximum Withdrawal Hours
0-23 15 or 12 (based on entry date)
24-51 12
52-89 9
90 or more hours 6
Candidate for Second Bachelor's Degree 6

  7. The student must secure a form from the Registrar's Office and indicate in writing which course grades are to be replaced for computation of the quality point average. The form designating specific course grade replacements will be maintained on permanent file in the Registrar's    
      Office.

  8. Decisions for course grade replacement are irrevocable.

9. All entries remain a part of the student's permanent record.


Class Attendance Policies

Regular class attendance is important to the educational experience of each student and to the academic integrity of the university curriculum. Students are expected to attend every class beginning with the first session. Regular class attendance is a student responsibility. A student is responsible for all the work, including tests and written work, of all class meetings. The University reserves the right to administratively withdraw students who have never attended classes for the semester.

For all general education classes, instructors will keep attendance records. If a student misses three consecutive class meetings, or misses more classes than the instructor deems advisable, the instructor will notify the Center for Academic Excellence (administrator of the Early Alert program) for appropriate follow-up. Departments may also develop and distribute attendance policies and procedures to be followed for students who miss an excessive number of classes.

For all classes, instructors have the discretion to determine how the attendance policy will be implemented, the circumstances under which make-up work may be allowed, and whether attendance will be used as a criterion in determining the final grade. Excessive absences may result in failure. Faculty will distribute a written statement of their attendance policy as part of the course syllabus. Students should not enroll in a course if participation in University-sponsored activities will cause them to miss an excessive number of classes, as determined by the instructor.

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke has a legal and moral obligation to accommodate all students who must be absent from classes or missed scheduled exams in order to observe religious holidays; we must be careful not to inhibit or penalize these students for exercising their rights to religious observance. To accommodate students' religious holidays, each student will be allowed two excused absences each semester with the following conditions:

  1. Students, who submit written notification to their instructors within two weeks of the beginning of the semester, shall be excused from class or other scheduled academic activity to observe a religious holy day of their faith. Excused absences are limited to two class sessions (days) per semester.
  2. Students shall be permitted a reasonable amount of time to make up tests or other work missed due to an excused absence for a religious observance.
  3. Students should not be penalized due to absence from class or other scheduled academic activity because of religious observances.

A student who is to be excused from class for a religious observance is not to provide a second party certification of the reason for the absence. Futhermore, a student who believes that he or she has been unreasonably denied an education benefit due to religious beliefs or practices may seek redress through the student grievance procedure.


Withdrawal from the University

Up to the last day to receive a W in a course, a student may complete a “Request for Withdrawal” form, available from the Office of the Registrar webpage at www.uncp.edu/registrar. The student should get the required signatures, take the I.D. card to the Student Accounts Office, and return the form to the Office of the Registrar. The University makes applicable refunds only after the withdrawal procedure is completed.

After the last day to receive a W in a course, or if the student wishes to withdraw on time with grades of WX, the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment approves withdrawal from the University without academic penalty only when unusual and documentable circumstances warrant. Unsatisfactory academic performance does not by itself meet the requirement. As soon as possible, the student petitioning to withdraw from the University must meet with the Associate Vice Chancellor for Enrollment, present the appropriate medical or legal documentation, and complete the necessary forms. Withdrawal under these circumstances will not count toward a student’s 15 hour career withdrawal limit. In addition, the following conditions apply:

                     i.           

a WX will be recorded on the transcript for each course;

                    ii.           

the course(s) will count as attempted hours;

                   iii.           

the course(s) will not count in tuition surcharge calculations;

                   iv.           

the course(s) will not count in GPA calculation;

                    v.           

the course(s) are subject to all Financial Aid and SAP rules and calculations.

Students denied a request for the grade of WX may appeal to the Faculty Senate Subcommittee for Enrollment Management.  The subcommittee’s decision will be final.

Students who stop attending classes without completing the withdrawal procedure ordinarily receive an F in courses for which they are registered.


Requirements for Baccalaureate Graduation

When advising students, the department chairs, the registrar, and faculty advisors try to make certain that every student who intends to graduate from the University registers for those courses which are required for a degree. The student however, must assume the final responsibility for meeting graduation requirements set forth in this catalog. Each candidate for graduation must meet all of the following requirements:

1. Have a minimum of 120-128 semester hours of course work in accordance with specific degree requirements excluding ENG 0104, MAT 0104, EDN 0104; MUS 0106

2. Have successfully completed the General Education Program;

3. Earn a grade of "C" (2.0) or better in both English composition courses, ENG 0105 and ENG 0106;

4. Have successfully completed a program for an academic major;

5. Have a minimum overall cumulative quality point average of 2.0 in coursework attempted at The University of North Carolina at Pembroke;

6. Have a minimum overall cumulative quality point average of 2.0 in the major field of study;

7. Complete a minimum of 9 semester hours above the General Education Program level in the major field of study at UNC Pembroke if the student transferred here;

8. Be registered during the academic year in which the student's graduation occurs;

9. Complete the last 25 percent of course work in residence at UNC Pembroke. An internship or study abroad program approved by the Dean and the Department Chair may be substituted unless it reduces the number of semester hours in residence to less than 30;

10. Count no more than 3 semester hours of activity courses toward the credit hours required for graduation. Activity courses are defined as having: no regularly scheduled class meeting time, no well defined instructional format, and no graded (A, B, C, D) work required. Excluded from this definition are FRS 100 (Freshman Seminar) and supervised internship courses.

11. Count no more than 24 semester hours of correspondence and/or extension credit (with no more than 12 hours of correspondence) from regionally accredited institutions toward a degree, provided that such correspondence credit is approved by the Office of the Registrar and will not be applied to satisfy specifically stated course requirements in major programs (NOTE: Any student needing to take correspondence work after admission to study at UNC Pembroke may be permitted to do so only after obtaining formal approval from the student's academic advisor, from the Office of Academic Affairs, and from the Office of the Registrar.);

12. Meet the requirements of one catalog which were current at the time the student entered this institution or a subsequent catalog. Students will not be allowed to meet some of the requirements of one catalog and some of the requirements of another catalog;

13. Meet the requirements of the catalog in effect at time of readmission or those of a subsequent catalog if attendance is interrupted for more than one semester;

14. Complete an application for a degree no later than October 1st for the Spring or Summer Commencement and March 1st for the Winter Commencement when earned hours reach 75 (end of first semester of junior year);

a. The Degree Application Form can be obtained from the Office of the Registrar;

b. The form must be completed entirely and all signatures obtained;

c. Pay a non-refundable graduation fee of $40 by the required date or an additional $25 late filing fee will be charged;

d. If the candidate fails to meet this requirement as specified, the student must wait until the next commencement to receive his or her degree;

15. Complete 9 semester hours of Writing Enriched (WE) and Writing in the Discipline (WD) courses. One of these courses must be in the Writing in the Discipline (WD) format.

17. Satisfy all financial obligations to the University.

All candidates are encouraged to complete a file in the Career Center.


Commencement

A student may complete graduation requirements at the end of fall, spring or summer session. A student who completes requirements in fall or spring is required to attend commencement at that time. A student who completes graduation at the close of the summer sessions will have the option of returning to participate in the Winter Commencement or of receiving the diploma in absentia. If the student elects to receive the diploma in absentia, the student must submit to the Registrar one month prior to graduation a written request which indicates the address to where the diploma will be mailed. The diploma will be mailed after commencement.

A student may participate in commencement exercises if he or she has met all the requirements for graduation. When commencement takes place before final grades are processed, a student may participate in commencement if the Registrar has not been notified that the student will not meet all the requirements by the last day of exams.

Accessibility Resource Center

The Accessibility Resource Center (ARC) is designed to assist students covered under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA). Anyone desiring assistance is requested to contact ARC, located in the D.F. Lowry Building, Room 107. Operating hours are Monday-Friday, 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Appointments during regular business hours are requested and can be made by calling (910) 521-6695. After-hours appointments may be made on an as-needed basis.

The Accessibility Resource Center will: (1) provide guidelines for documenting disabilities; (2) discern eligibility for services; (3) determine reasonable accommodations; and (4) facilitate appropriate accommodations. Contact the Accessibility Resource Center for additional information.


The Academic Support Center

The Academic Support Center embodies UNCP's commitment to student success. Our programs, offices, and resources form a comprehensive academic support network that can assist students as they find their ideal path and degree. ASC programs include:

  • Explanation and referral information regarding the campus and community 
  • Academic Resource Mentors
  • HAWK Alert 
  • Supplemental Instruction
  • Tutoring
  • Alpha Sigma Lambda
  • Lambda Sigma

We encourage students to stop by the Center, located in the D.F. Lowry Building. Our goal is help students identify and access the various resources available at UNCP. For more information, call 910-521-6625 or visit our website at www.uncp.edu/cae.


Policies Concerning Student Records

The policy of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke concerning the contents and confidentiality of student records has been developed around several administrative needs. The University is charged with administration functions which make it necessary to acquire, maintain, and have convenient access to certain information. These include decisions regarding admission, advancement, graduation, and other important steps in the academic process. In order to serve the students, adequate records must be available when students wish to apply for financial aid, transfer, employment, graduate school, and other University purposes. However, at the same time, the University must respect obligations of confidentiality toward the student.


Student Education Records at UNC General Administration: Annual Notification of Rights

Certain personally identifiable information about students ("education records") may be maintained at The University of North Carolina General Administration, which serves the Board of Governors of the University system. This student information may be the same as, or derivative of, information maintained by a constituent institution of the University or it may be additional information. Whatever their origins, education records maintained at General Administration are subject to the federal Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA).

FERPA provides that a student may inspect his or her education records. If the student finds the records to be inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student's privacy rights, the student may request amendment to the record. FERPA also provides that a student's personally identifiable information may not be released to someone else unless (1) the student has given a proper consent for disclosure or (2) provisions of FERPA or federal regulations issued pursuant to FERPA permit the information to be released without the student's consent.

A student may file with the U.S. Department of Education a complaint concerning failure of General Administration or an institution to comply with FERPA.

The policies of The University of North Carolina General Administration concerning FERPA may be inspected in the office at each constituent institution designated to maintain the FERPA policies of the institution. Policies of General Administration may also be accessed in the Office of the Secretary of The University of North Carolina, General Administration, 910 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill, NC.

Further details about FERPA and FERPA procedures at General Administration are to be found in the referenced policies. Questions about the policies may be directed to Legal Section, Office of the President, The University of North Carolina, General Administration, Annex Building, 910 Raleigh Road, Chapel Hill, NC (mailing address P.O. Box 2688, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2688; tel: 919-962-4588).


Inspection and Release of Student Records at UNCP

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke complies with all provisions of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974. The full statement of the University's policy is available in the Office of the Registrar located in Lumbee Hall.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include:

1. The right to inspect and review the student's education records within a reasonable period of time after the University receives a written request for access. At UNCP, students should submit to the Registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The Registrar will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the Registrar, then she or he shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed.

2. The right to request the amendment of the student's education records that the student believes is inaccurate. Students may ask the University to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate. They should write to the Registrar, clearly identify the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate. If the University decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the University will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing.

3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student's education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University of North Carolina at Pembroke or the University of North Carolina Office of the President in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility.

Upon request, the University discloses education records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

Institutions can disclose student information to parents in certain situations, including the following: If a parent claims the student as a federal tax dependent, UNCP may, with confirmation of that status, disclose information about the student to both parents, regardless of the student's age or whether there is an emergency; if the student is under 21, UNCP may inform the student's parents of violations of its alcohol or drug policy, regardless of whether the student is a tax dependent or whether there is an emergency; and if UNCP reasonably believes that there is a health or safety emergency involving the student, UNCP may inform the student's parents, regardless of the student's age or whether the student is a tax dependent.

4. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is: Family Policy Compliance Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20202-4605.

The University routinely releases to the public so-called Directory Information, as follows: the student's name, address(es), telephone listing, major field of study, participation in officially recognized activities and sports, weight and height of members of athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees and awards received, electronic mail address, and previous educational agency or institution attended by the student. Any student who wishes to have the above Directory Information withheld must sign and file a request in the Registrar's Office within two weeks of the first day of class of each semester. This request must be renewed at the beginning of each semester. Directory information for every student who does not file a request to withhold disclosure within two weeks of the first day of class of the Fall Semester will be published in the student telephone directory and distributed to all students, faculty and staff. Even if a student files a request to block disclosure of Directory Information, it may still be inspected by those persons authorized by law to inspect education records without consent.


Miscellaneous

Academic eligibility for a student shall be determined by current regulations. UNC Pembroke reserves the right to change without notice any fee, provision, offering, or requirement in this Handbook, and to determine whether a student has satisfactorily met the requirements for admission or graduation.


Emergency University Closing Information

Any decision to cancel classes at UNCP will be made by the Chancellor or, in his/her absence, the Provost/Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs. The University has authority to make its own decisions and announcements about the operation of the University during adverse weather and other emergency conditions.

The University will remain open for classes unless there is a clear and present danger to the safety and welfare of students, faculty, or staff. Public announcements about closings or late openings applicable to other State agencies, or to other State employees, do not apply to UNC Pembroke or its employees. Unless the University announces a closing, late opening, or cancellation of classes, all offices and service operations are expected to remain open, and personnel are expected to report to work.

The overriding concern of the University is to provide a quality, uninterrupted program of studies for its students without placing them or the staff in an unreasonably hazardous situation. Students, faculty, and staff commuting to the University are encouraged to evaluate conditions and use good judgment in determining whether to attempt the commute to the University under adverse weather conditions. The University does not expect students, faculty, or staff to place themselves at risk or in harm's way in order to attend class or report to work. Students and staff are asked to let their professor or supervisor know as quickly as possible what their particular circumstances are, as the administration of the University expects faculty and supervisors to be sensitive to inclement weather conditions that adversely affect class and work attendance.

On days when the University will delay or cancel classes due to inclement weather, that decision will be made, if practicable, by 6:00 a.m. The announcement will be placed on the UNCP BraveAlert Emergency Information Hotline at (910) 521-6888 and will appear on two UNCP Web pages (www.uncp.edu and www.uncpalert.com). The announcement will also be communicated to regional radio and television stations.

It is the University's intention to ensure that students living on campus will have full access to the Chavis University Center, the Jones Athletic Complex, and the Livermore Library, at a minimum, until 10:00 p.m. When the campus is closed, staff personnel designated as "mission essential" are expected to report to work.

Student Housing

Student Handbook: Student Housing

Click the following link to access that section of the Student Handbook:

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On-Campus Housing Information

A Housing Agreement/Application must be completed by all students entering UNCP who request to reside on campus. The application can be obtained from the Office of Housing and Residence Life Office or from the Web site at www.uncp.edu/housing. This application and a deposit must be on file before a room assignment can be considered. The deposit protects the room reservation until the student graduates, terminates his/her Housing Agreement, or has his/her Housing Agreement terminated and is refundable provided the procedures detailed in the Housing Agreement/Application are followed. All students moving into student housing must have paid their room and board fees before keys can be issued to rooms.

A student residing in campus housing must be enrolled for 6 semester hours or more for undergraduate students and 3 semester hours for graduate students. Exceptions to this policy may be requested to the Director of Housing and Residence Life or his/her designated representative.

On campus student housing at the University of North Carolina Pembroke is designed to enhance a student’s total education experience by utilizing housing as a unique learning environment. An integral and rewarding experience of Housing and Residence Life is meeting new people who will become lifelong friends, having regular contact with faculty and administration, and having convenient access to numerous programs and facilities throughout the year. The department offers a variety of programs which enhance a student’s intellectual, personal, and social development.


First Year Freshman Residency Requirement

First year freshman students at UNCP are required to reside on campus for their initial academic year. Attendance during MayMester, Summer Sessions, programs at UNCP or programs at other institutions do not apply toward the fulfillment of this requirement. For purposes of this requirement, a first-year freshman residential student is defined as: any incoming student who will not be 21 years of age prior to August 1st of the initial enrollment year and who is registered for a course load of 9 credit hours or more. A first year freshman who transfers to UNCP during the spring semester with fewer than 12 hours of credit and falling within the age and course load requirements listed above will be considered first year freshmen and subject to this policy. AP College credit or Dual Enrollment credits do not apply toward the fulfillment of this requirement.

This requirement may be waived if the student is: (1) living either with a parent or guardian; (2) married; (3) a parent or guardian with legal custody of children; (4) 21 years of age prior to August 1st; (5) a veteran; or (6) a student with a special need (documentation will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis). A student must complete a "First Year Freshman Authorization to Commute Form" and submit to the Housing Coordinator in the Office of Housing and Residence Life. A student requesting a waiver should submit the form by the deadline of July 31 for students beginning the fall semester and December 15 for students beginning in the spring semester. A copy of the waiver form may be obtained at www.uncp/housing/forms.

The Housing Coordinator will render a decision based on the information provided. The student may appeal to the Director of Housing and Residence Life after notification of the Housing Coordinator's decision. If a student chooses to appeal the Director's decision, the student may appeal to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. The decision of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs is final and conclusive. The only issue to be considered in any appeal at any level is whether or not the individual's appeal request fits the criteria listed above.

First year freshman students who meet the residency requirement but do not submit a Housing Agreement or are not approved to be exempt from the requirement will automatically be assigned on-campus housing. The student will be required to pay room and meal charges for the academic year to satisfy the first year freshman residency requirement.

The University has residence halls and an apartment complex, all centrally located to dining facilities, the Chavis University Center, athletic facilities, and computer labs. Classes are only a short walk away. Each room contains beds, desks, chairs, chest of drawers, closet space, and blinds. Residents furnish their own linens, floor coverings, study lamps and those other items that will personalize the room. Washers and dryers are located in each housing facility for a minimal cost.

Each facility has Resident Advisors (RAs) who are available to assist with situations students may encounter while living in student housing. Community Directors are responsible for the supervision of RAs, social/educational programming, and after-hours operation of the facility. The support staff also includes housekeepers, maintenance personnel, and office personnel. The Director of Housing and Residence Life is responsible for departmental administration and budgeting, as well as overseeing the entire operation of facilities and staff.


Room Assignments

The Office of Housing and Residence Life is responsible for room assignments, for approving or denying room and roommate changes, and consolidating vacancies. Assignments will normally be made on the basis of two students per room; however, single rooms can be obtained for an additional fee if space is available. Rooms in the residential facilities are to be occupied only by the students assigned to them. A student's right to occupy a room may not be assigned or transferred by the student.

Room assignments may be changed only upon the written authorization from the Office of Housing and Residence Life. There are two opportunities during the academic year (Fall Semester/Spring Semester) when students may change rooms and/or roommates. This is accomplished by submitting a "Room Change Request Form" to the main office. A copy of this form is available from the main office. There is a grace period at the beginning of each semester before a room change will be made. This is to allow adequate time for roommates to make a good faith effort to resolve differences and for the university to assess its housing needs. Students desiring to change rooms and/or roommates after the room change period has ended must meet with their respective Community Director and participate in a mediation process. Any student who changes rooms without prior approval by the Office of Housing and Residence Life will be assessed a $25 fee.

It is the policy of the University to assign roommates without regard to race, color, national origin, religion, age, or handicap. Students of the opposite sex will not be assigned to, nor may they reside in, the same room. The University will make every effort to honor specific roommate or hall requests, although such requests are never guaranteed.


Consolidation

The University reserves the right to consolidate residents to ensure full capacity when vacancies occur and may move students to another room or facility when such consolidation becomes necessary. All room changes must be completed within three (3) days after notification to consolidate. Requests to honor specific roommate or hall assignments are NOT GUARANTEED.


Alcohol-Free Environment

The University’s alcohol policy permits students of legal age to possess or consume alcohol only within the confines of their residence hall room. There are many reasons an individual may choose to reside in an alcohol-free environment. These reasons range from personal lifestyle preferences, cultural or religious beliefs, and/or desires related to recovery from personal or family abuse problems. One roommate’s reason for choosing an alcohol-free environment may be very similar or very different from the others’. Assignments in alcohol-free environments are available on a first-come, first-served basis at the following locations: North Hall 3rd. 4th, and 5th floors; Belk Hall 3rd and 5th floors; Pine Hall, first floor.  Residents are required to sign a pledge to refrain from possession and use of alcohol on the alcohol-free floor.


Termination of Campus Housing by the University

Campus housing is a privilege and not a right. The University will terminate a student's Housing Agreement when behavior is disruptive or when actions are abusive to the facilities. Violations which compromise the safety and security of residents will result in exclusion from the student housing and termination of the Housing Agreement. Termination of the Housing Agreement is not disciplinary in nature but is a function of providing safe and comfortable accommodations to all residents. However, termination of the Housing Agreement does not preclude discipline by the University for violation of University rules, nor does it preclude civil or criminal proceedings in the courts where such is appropriate.

Any appeal of the Director of Housing and Residence Life decision to terminate the Housing Agreement must be made to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs whose decision shall be final. The Vice Chancellor will make a decision based upon the merits of each individual case.


Room Condition

Upon vacating a room, a student shall leave the assigned room, its furnishings and equipment in a condition equal to the same as they were upon commencement of the student's occupancy, ordinary wear and tear excepted. In addition to the check by student staff, housing staff will check the room for cleaning/damages, which will be assessed to the responsible individuals. Personal property left in a room following the termination of occupancy will be deemed to have been abandoned. Students may be charged for the removal of such property.

No alterations or repairs may be made to the assigned room, its furnishings or equipment without the expressed written consent of the Office of Housing and Residence Life. University furniture must remain in the room and may not be placed in storage.

The University will assess damage charges for unauthorized use of, and alterations to rooms, furnishings, equipment, and buildings, and for special cleaning necessitated by improper care of rooms. Charges are also made for damages/excessive cleaning to public areas with all residents of a corridor or suite held accountable for equal portions of the total charges when responsibility remains undetermined. Cleaning/damage charges will be assessed to the student.


University's Right to Entry

The University reserves the right (a) to enter any room/apartment for the purpose of inspection, maintenance, or repairs; (b) to enter any room/apartment without notice to, or permission of, the resident thereof for the purpose of (1) inspecting for illegal drugs or narcotics and (2) inspecting for firearms, explosives, weapons, or any substances, materials or goods that may constitute a danger to persons in the residence halls or where their possession is a breach of the Housing Agreement, of the standards and regulations of the University, or the laws of North Carolina; (c) to enter any room/apartment when there is reason to believe that the occupants are in serious physical or psychological danger or distress. Such entry and inspection, however, should be made only when the University has reasonable cause to believe that such items or circumstances exist.


Health and Safety Regulations

Health and safety regulations have been established for the protection of students, staff, and property. Failure to comply with these regulations will be cause for disciplinary action, including exclusion from on-campus student housing.

A. Open flames, candles, incense, propane stoves, gas and electric grills, charcoal grills, propane and gas canisters, and charcoal and lighter fuel are not permitted in residence hall and apartment rooms, hallways, breezeways, porches, or roof areas.

B. Electric frying pans, open coiled appliances, gas and electric grills, charcoal grills, oil lamps, electric or kerosene heaters, deep fat cookers, and cooking with or extracting of hot grease are prohibited in the residence hall rooms. In the apartments, use of cooking appliances is permitted in the kitchen area, but must be attended to and monitored when in use.

Permitted items include: hot pots, hot plates, coffee makers, tea makers, and/or air popcorn poppers. Items such as irons, hair dryers, curling irons, hair straighteners, and electric curlers should not be left unattended when in use. Microwaves in student rooms and in common areas must be attended to and monitored when in use.

C. All residents should evacuate the residence hall/apartment when a fire alarm is sounded. Evacuate by using the stairs and the nearest outside exit door.

D. Bathrooms, hallways, and breezeways must be kept clear of personal belongings and other objects that create a safety hazard.

E. Jamming doors or purposely hindering the exit of residents from their room or building is prohibited.

F. Room screens may not be removed, opened, or tampered with at any time with the exception of situations of imminent danger or when authorized personnel are
installing air conditioners. At no time should a window be left opened and unlocked when the room is vacant.

G. Vending machines should not be shaken, tilted, abused, or moved.

H. Water beds are not permitted in residence hall/apartment rooms.

I. Excluding Village Apartments, ceiling fans, freezers, and oversized refrigerators are prohibited.

J. Throwing objects from windows, breezeways, and porches is prohibited.

K. Decorations are prohibited on ceilings and egress doors.

L. Halogen lamps are not permitted in the residence halls/apartments.

M. Any internal combustion engine, any acids, automobile batteries, and gasoline are not permitted in the residence halls/apartments.

N. Firearms or other weapons and fireworks are not permitted in the residence halls/apartments.

O. Microwaves are not permitted in North and Belk Hall rooms until such time that electrical upgrades are made in those residential facilities. Note: Microwaves are located on each floor of North and Belk Halls for those residents.


Pets

The student housing setting is not conducive to the presence of animals; therefore, the university prohibits pets (including guest and visitor pets) with the exception of freshwater fish and approved service animals. Aquariums under ten gallons are permitted and are limited to one per room. During extended holiday hours, power may be shut off which could affect heating and lighting in student rooms. Violations of this regulation will result in the resident being cited on an Incident Documentation Form. The student will be subject for the expenses incurred for the room in violation and the adjoining rooms in the event that the exterminators are contacted. The Animal Control Board will be contacted to remove the animal if a student continues to violate this policy.


University Liability

The University does not assume any obligation or liability for loss or damage to items of personal property which may occur in its buildings or on its grounds, prior to, during or subsequent to the terms of the Housing Agreement. This includes, but is not limited to, damage, loss, water damage, fire, theft, flooding, etc. No interruption of utility services, heating, and cooling shall be deemed as an eviction or disturbance of students' use of facilities or render the University liable for damages unless the University willfully refuses to supply said services without cause or excuse.


University Guidelines

All students housed in the residential facilities are required to abide by the Code of Conduct published in the STUDENT HANDBOOK. Violations which compromise the safety and security of resident students will be cause for immediate contract termination and other appropriate action. Such violations include, but are not limited to, the following:

a. Allowing individuals into the building who are not residents of the facility by opening secured outside entrance doors to allow unauthorized access;

b. Access into a building by use of a key, building access card, or security code by individuals who are not residents of the facility;

c. Delivering, surrendering, or otherwise relinquishing possession of the room key, building key, building access card or security code to the entrance door;

d. Possessing or using weapons such as, but not limited to, firearms, fireworks, explosives, knives, bows and arrows, or martial arts equipment;

e. Endangering, injuring, or assaulting a staff member related to the staff member's job function;

f. Tampering, alarming, discharging, disconnecting, or dismantling the fire safety equipment, including, but not limited to, fire extinguishers, pull stations, fire hoses and smoke/heat detectors;

g. Starting fires in the residential facilities.

Upon the student's violation of the standards of conduct, the University at its option may terminate the Housing Agreement by giving notice to the student of such termination. If the Agreement is so terminated, the student remains liable for room and board fees.


General Guidelines

The Office of Housing and Residence Life has established a documentation procedure to address violations of the general guidelines for on-campus student housing.

  • An initial offense of a general guideline for student housing will result in a courtesy warning by the Resident Advisor. The warning reminds the student of the policy for his/her particular violation.
  • For an additional violation, the Resident Advisor documents the nature of the violation. The Resident Advisor and the students will initial the documentation form and a copy of the first written warning will be submitted to the student.

A subsequent violation will result in an administrative conference with the Community Director of that facility. A letter summarizing the outcome of the meeting will be delivered directly to the resident.

  1. Quiet hours are in effect from 10 pm to 9 am, Sunday through Friday, and from 1 am to noon, Saturday and Sunday. Round-the-clock quiet hours will be observed during exam week. Courtesy hours are any hours of the day that are not quiet hours. Students are urged to use common sense when it comes to courtesy hours. Violations of courtesy hours or quiet hours could place a student in the position of being dismissed from campus housing.
  2. On-campus student housing is operated by the University to provide convenient, comfortable, and congenial quarters for students. Courtesy, respect for others, and a sense of personal responsibility on the part of residents are needed to attain this purpose.
  3. Such courtesies as knocking before entering a room and respecting "Do Not Disturb" signs should be observed.
  4. The use of student housing facilities is restricted to residents and their guests. It is the obligation of each resident to report immediately any unauthorized visitors.
  5. Loitering around on-campus student housing facilities after visitation hours have expired is prohibited.
  6. No one is to approach residence hall/apartment windows at any time from the outside.
  7. Residents may not move from one room to another without permission from the Office of Housing and Residence Life.
  8. University furniture may not be taken from any location to which it is assigned and placed in another location. Penalty: Twenty-five dollars ($25).
  9. All state laws pertinent to the possession and consumption of alcoholic beverages are enforced.
  10. Window screens should not be removed, even from hall windows.
  11. Students engaged in catches, tosses, or other casual activities should be conducted outside around residential facilities in a safe, unobtrusive and non-disruptive manner. For the protection of residents, guests, visitors and university property, team sports, activities that are more organized or have the potential to become organized and/or physical are expected to be relocated to an appropriate area.
  12. Laundry equipment may be used for and by residents only.
  13. Bed linen, towels, and washcloths will be provided by the residents.
  14. Residents having overnight guests should have the advance permission of roommates and are required to obtain approval from the Resident Administrator. Guests staying longer than forty eight hours must pay the daily rate.
  15. Whenever a student misplaces, loses, or has his/her room key stolen, a $30 fee will be charged to change the lock and issue new keys.
  16. An administrative fee of $50 will be assessed for any act of vandalism. This fee will be in addition to any cost for repairs or replacement and any disciplinary action.


Visitation Policy

The visitation program for on-campus student housing creates a structure for residents to bring guests into their rooms. Students residing on-campus are expected to view their academic responsibilities as their primary goal; therefore, studying takes preference over socializing in student residences on weekday nights. On the weekend when fewer classes are scheduled, a greater amount of leisure time and social or non-academic activities are usually more prominent. The guidelines for visitation are grounded in the academic schedule and are designed to balance a student's responsibilities with individual and group needs.

General Guidelines and Procedures

All residents are responsible to escort their guest at all times while the guest remains in the building and to inform their guest of all university policies and regulations. Hosts are responsible for their guests' behavior, for any damages incurred and for the adherence to all university policies and procedures. Guests in residence halls with hours of visitation must register with the staff when entering and exiting the building. False identification will be submitted to Campus Police for appropriate action. Three guests per resident will be allowed unless permission is granted by a Community Director. Students and their guest are responsible for using the appropriate restroom for their gender. Public facilities are located in the main lobby of each building.

Loss of Privileges

Like most opportunities at the university, visitation is not a right, but rather a privilege that may be suspended at any time for violations of policies. Visitation privileges may be suspended administratively by the Office of Housing and Residence Life or by a judicial officer as a result of disciplinary action. Modifications to the visitation policy may be imposed if a student's rights are being compromised.

Days and Hours

The hours of visitation for Belk Hall, North Hall, and Pine Hall on Sunday through Thursday shall not exceed 11am through midnight and 11am on Friday and Saturday through 2am on Saturday and Sunday. Twenty-four hour visitation is permitted in the lobby and first floor lounge area. Hallways, stairways, and upstairs lounges are not considered twenty-four hour visitation areas. Visitation for the University Village Apartments, Courtyard Apartments, Oak Residence Hall and Cypress Residence Hall is open visitation. Open visitation implies that restrictions are determined by roommates and suitemates according to each other's rights and needs. Respect for the wishes and well being of one's roommate(s) is more important than someone's desire to have guests.


UNCP's Residential Computer Network - ResNet

What is ResNet?

ResNet is the wireless and wired Internet access for residential students who bring their personal computers to campus. To access the network, the student’s personal computer must meet UNCP’s student computer system requirements.  All information pertaining to ResNet can be found on the Division of Information Technology’s (DoIT) website at www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet.  Wired and wireless Internet in the residence halls is accessible via SafeConnect.

Who Can Connect?

Network connections are available in all University-provided housing including residence halls, University Village Apartments and University Courtyard Apartments. Any student living in residential housing is eligible to access ResNet. Student computers must be registered with SafeConnect when they are connected to the network in campus housing.

What Can Be Connected?

 

·        

Mobile and desktop computers which meet the “System Requirements” below

·        

Mobile devices such as iPhones, iPads, Android devices, etc.

·        

Gaming systems such as Sony PlayStation, Microsoft Xbox, and Nintendo systems

·        

Other media devices such as Roku, Smart TV’s, Wi-Fi Blu-ray players, etc.

Computers and devices with a browser are automatically prompted to register when the browser is opened.  Game systems and other devices that do not have a browser can be registered/de-registered online from another device connected to the network via BraveWeb.    In BraveWeb, use the “Manual Device Enrollment” link.   The instructions found at www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet/game for game systems apply to both wired and wireless access.


What Cannot be Connected?

 

·        

Any network devices that provide routing, wireless access, and/or DHCP services

·        

Google Chromecast, Apple TVs and wireless printers will not work on the UNCP network.

·        

Network services that negatively impact the performance, security, and/or reliability of ResNet         

Note: Connecting any of these type devices may result in loss of network privileges.


What are the Costs?

 

There is no extra cost for ResNet services; however, students must use a Cat 5 or 6 Ethernet cable if they wish to connect their device to the wired network. Cables are available for purchase at the UNCP Bookstore.


Connection Information

 

All computers connected to the UNCP network must have an up-to-date operating system and compatible anti-virus protection, installed, running and up-to-date. UNCP utilizes SafeConnect to ensure this compliance. Directions for accessing the network, registering for ResNet and installing the SafeConnect Policy Key can be found at www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet.

 

System Requirements

Windows Operating Systems

·        

Windows Vista, 7 or 8

·        

Windows Updates configured to install automatically

·        

All critical Windows updates installed

·        

SafeConnect Network Access Control (NAC) Policy Key installed and running (instructions available at www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet)

·        

Acceptable anti-virus software installed, running, and definitions up-to-date (view the SafeConnect compatible anti-virus list at www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet/av)

 

Mac OSX

·        

Mac OS X Leopard or newer with an Intel Processor

·        

SafeConnect Policy Key installed and running (instructions available at www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet)

·        

Acceptable anti-virus software installed, running, and definitions up-to-date (view the SafeConnect compatible anti-virus list at www.uncp.edu/doit/resnet/av)

 

GNU/Linux Distributions

·        

GNU/Linux Distributions may also connect to ResNet through web browser authentication.


Student Support

 

ResNet assistance is limited to network and Internet connectivity issues including the SafeConnect Policy Key.   UNCP does not offer technical support for students’ personal computers outside of network connectivity. A student will need to demonstrate that the system is working properly and sign a release waiving UNCP of any liability before receiving assistance from DoIT staff. Any problems or issues outside of basic connectivity will be the responsibility of the student to repair before assistance will be given.

Students needing support for ResNet issues should contact ResNet Support at 910-522-5710, resnet@uncp.edu or go to the Mary Livermore Library room 239, across from the computer lab.  Clearly state your name and contact information when leaving a voicemail and include your name and contact information when sending email.


Copyright Violations

 

The Digital Millennium Copyright Act (DMCA) was signed into law on October 12, 1998. DoIT receives copyright infringement notices whenever they are detected by the Motion Picture Association of America and/or the Recording Industry Association of America. These notices are sent to the Office of Housing and Residence Life for processing. The person registered with the offending network address is notified by Housing and Residence Life and must take action to eliminate the copyright issues. A second notice results in temporary loss of network access privileges pending disciplinary action determined by Housing and Residence Life. A third offense can result in permanent loss of network access privileges.  Students should be knowledgeable about peer-to-peer file sharing and file downloading, and are encouraged to learn about   legal alternatives for downloading and sharing copyrighted materials by visiting www.uncp.edu/student-life/student-services/information-technology/polici....

 

Terms and Conditions

Users of UNCP’s technology services must abide by institutional policies (see www.uncp.edu/doit/aup). This policy is intended to preserve the utility and flexibility of the system, to protect the privacy and work of students, faculty, and staff, and to preserve the right to access the international networks to which UNCP’s systems are connected. Failure to comply with the guidelines may result in, at minimum, termination of access and services. DoIT requires that students keep their systems up-to-date with the latest patches and updates. Anti-virus software should be running on all systems and should always be up-to-date. If it is determined that a system is propagating a virus or malware of any type, network access will be denied.

Student Government

Click the following link to access that section of the Student Handbook:

SGA President's Message

Hello,

I would like to take this opportunity to welcome you to the University of North Carolina at Pembroke (UNCP). I am elated that you have chosen our campus to further your education and to create memories that will last for a lifetime.

As President of the Student Government Association (SGA) and a fellow student, I would like to share with you a few very important items as you prepare to begin your 2014-2015 academic year as a Brave.

Whether you are an incoming student or a returning student, I encourage you to take the initiative to become involved. Your student involvement is key to succeeding here at UNCP. Identify what you are passionate about, seek out opportunities, and work towards achieving your goals.

If you do not know your passion we have over 90+ student organizations from intramural sports to Greek life. We also have an office dedicated to helping you find opportunities to participate in community service programs. Being involved on campus does not only help to build lasting relationships with fellow students but it also help you grow as an individual. I was once told that, mistakes are going happen; problems are going to arise, but just as problems occur and mistakes are made, solutions are found. You can and you will overcome any hurdle that comes your way because you are BRAVER than you think.

The Student Government Association is an organization established to represent the voice of the students. We are here to assist the student body in discovering themselves and recognizing their true potential as they take on the journey of becoming an eminent leader in their community. We have many goals for the upcoming year, but our biggest goal for 2014-2015 is to listen to the needs of the students here at UNCP. You will see our fellow SGA senators all around campus so if you have any questions or concerns in regards to anything on campus, please do not hesitate to ask. SGA meets every Wednesday during the academic year and our office is located on the second floor of the University Center Annex. We hope that you will visit us and get involved, you will create the college experience you hope to have.

So again I would like to welcome you to our UNCP family.  And remember, your experience here at the University of North Carolina at Pembroke is what you make it.

Make it memorable.

Best regards,

Biruk Kassaw
SGA President

Biruk Kassaw, SGA President
Tanner O'Quin, Vice President

General Information

The purpose of the Student Government Association (SGA) is to represent and safeguard interests of the students. It is basically a political organization providing students with an avenue for action in matters pertaining to student rights and welfare. Although discipline is the legal responsibility of the administration, the principle of student government is fully supported by the administration and faculty.

All students attending The University of North Carolina at Pembroke automatically be­come members of the Student Government Association. Student Government functions through its elected representatives and is subject to the general administrative authority of its sponsor, the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. Every full-time student who has at least a 2.5 cumulative average (on the 4.0 system) has the privilege of seeking positions of leadership in the organization by either appointment or election. The Student Government Association is elected by the student body each spring according to the Constitution and By­-Laws of the organization.

The Student Government Association is composed of an Executive Branch and a Legislative Branch. The Executive Branch consists of the President, Vice President, and the Cabinet – which includes the Chief of Staff, Treasurer, Secretary, all committee heads, and any other positions deemed necessary. The Legislative Branch consists of the Student Senate, a body of elected student senators. There shall be a minimum of seven (7) senators per class to represent the student population.


The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Student Constitution
The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Student Government Association Constitution (from SGA Website) -

We, the members of the Student Body of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke, desiring to preserve within the University an atmosphere of free discussion, inquiry and self-expression, to ensure the personal freedom and general welfare of the Student Body, and to continue in our traditions of responsible self-governance, do hereby establish this Constitution of The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Student Government Association.

VOLUME I.

ARTICLE I – NAME, MISSION, PURPOSE, AND MEMBERSHIP

SECTION ONE - NAME

The name of this association is The University of North Carolina at Pembroke Student Government Association (SGA), hereafter referred to as “Student Government.”

SECTION TWO – MISSION

The Student Government exists to champion the concerns of the Student Body and to ensure that the rights of the students are upheld. The Student Government is also tasked to ensure affordable and accessible quality education for its Student Body.

SECTION THREE – PURPOSE

3.1.     Recognized by administration, faculty, and staff of the University, the purpose of the Student Government shall be to:

                A.  Represent the students of the University before the University Administration and the University Board of Trustees; and,

                B.   Promote each student’s right as outlined in the Student Handbook and promote the issues deemed beneficial to the students; and,

                C.  Address and act on collective interests of students enrolled in The University of North Carolina at Pembroke; and,

                D.  Involve students in the political process by educating students on the issues affecting them and the University.

SECTION FOUR – MEMBERSHIP

4.1.     There shall be two types of members of the Student Government: 

                A.  Constituent members of the Student Government;

                B.  Officers of the Student Government.

 

4.2.     Every student enrolled in The University of North Carolina at Pembroke who has 

           paid into the fees supporting the Student Government is considered a member of the                    

           Student Body. Every member of the Student Body is considered a Constituent member 

           of the Student Government for the current semester in which he or she is enrolled.  

           Membership to the Student Government is not restricted to only the undergraduate 

           students of the University. Members of the Student Body are allowed to vote in the 

             Student Government Elections.

 

4.3.     Officers of the Student Government is defined as members of the Student Senate, 

             members of the Staff, and the Executive Officers. 

 

           4.3.1.  Executive Officers are as follows:

       A.  The Student Body President;

       B.  The Student Body Vice President.

 

           4.3.2.  Members of the Student Senate are as follows:

       A.  All elected Senators of the Student Government;

       B.  The Student Body Vice President shall be an ex-officio non-voting member                 

                             serving in the capacity as the Student Senate President;

       C. The Members of the Staff shall be ex-officio non-voting members of the             Student Senate.

 

           4.3.3.  Members of the Staff are as follows:

       A.  The Chief of Staff;

       B.  The Student Body Treasurer;

       C.  The Student Body Secretary;

       D.  The Public Relations Officer;

        E.   Any position created by the Student Body President as he/she sees fit, with 

                              two thirds (2/3) approval of the Student Senate.

 

ARTICLE II - EXECUTIVE

 

SECTION ONE – AUTHORITY

The executive power of the Student Government shall be vested in the Student Body President.

 

SECTION TWO – DUTIES OF THE EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

The Executive Officers shall take office at the end of the Spring Commencement and leave office at the end of the following academic year’s Spring Commencement. During the term of the Executive Officers, they shall:

     A.  Advise the Student Senate on any matters of student policy or on any student          programs and services;

     B.  Provide coordination and communication with the Student Senate;

     C. Oversee any Student Government initiatives;

     D. Meet at least once every week with the Student Government Staff and Committee          Heads, inclusive of the Student Government advisor;

     E.  Communicate with the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at least once every two                weeks.

 

 

SECTION THREE– ELECTIONS

The Student Government Executive Officers shall be elected for a one-year term by a majority of those voting in the Student Body Elections. The Executive Officers shall be chosen from the Student Body at large. Requirements for Student Government Executive Offices shall be listed in the Electoral Code. 

 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

 

SECTION FOUR– STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT

The Student Body President shall:

     A.   Serve as the student representative on the Board of Trustees, in ex-officio;

     B.   Appoint students in University Committees, as listed in the Student Government                 Statutes;

     C.  Be responsible for establishing a job description and/or set of job responsibilities for           Executive Officers;

     D.  Be responsible for seeing that Executive Officers receive proper training in their    

           duties;

     E.   Hire members of the Staff within sixty (60) calendar days of proclamation as Student           Body President-elect;

     F.    Appoint officers necessary for the operation of the Student Government during the           Summer sessions;

     G.  Have the power to veto any Student Senate act within ten (10) days of approval from           the Student Senate President;

     H.  Have the power to call special elections, when deemed necessary, with approval of      

           two thirds of the Student Senate;

     I.    Have the power to create new Student Government Staff positions, as he/she sees           fit, with approval of two thirds of the Student Senate, to be added onto the Student           Government Statutes;

     J.    Serve as an ex-officio delegate of the Student Government to The University of 

           North Carolina Association of Student Governments, and be responsible for 

           appointing other delegates in accordance to the Student Government Statutes;

     K.   Appoint students to fill vacated elective offices, unless otherwise specified in the                                                                                 student Body Constitution or Student Body Statutes subject to the approval of two-

           thirds of the Student Senate.

 

SECTION FIVE – STUDENT BODY VICE PRESIDENT

The Student Body Vice President shall:

     A.   Serve as the Student Senate President;

     B.   Serve as presiding officer of all Student Senate meetings;

     C.   Call all meetings of the Student Senate;

     D.   Forward all legislation within three (3) days of its passing to the Student Body    

            President;

     E.    Assist the Student Body President in the performance of his or her duties;

     F.     Succeed to the Student Body Presidency in the event of vacating that office;

     G.  Exercise the powers of the Student Body President if he or she is prevented from                               exercising his or her powers;

     H.  Be responsible for appointing a Speaker Pro Tempore and Parliamentarian from    

           among the current Student Senate officers, with approval of two-thirds of the Student 

           Senate;

     I.    Appoint the Student Senate Committee Chairs;

     J.    Have the power to call special meetings of the Student Senate, with a three (3) day   

           notice prior to the date of the special meeting.

 

 

 

SECTION SIX – LINES OF SUCCESSION

6.1.  If the Student Body President position is vacated for any reason, the Senate President shall 

        assume the office of Student Body President.

 

6.2.  If the Senate President position is vacated for any reason, the Speaker Pro Tempore shall 

        assume the office of Senate President.

 

          6.2.1.  If the Speaker Pro Tempore position is vacant when the Senate President           

                      position is vacated, the Student Body President has the authority to appoint a    

                      current Senator to be Senate President with approval of two-thirds of the 

                      Student Senate. 

          6.2.2.  If in the event of a write-in victory for an individual running for Student Body 

                      President and results in a vacancy in the Senate President position, the Student 

                      Body President-elect may appoint an interim Senate President from the 

                      Senator-elect pool, to be approved by the Student Senate in the following      

                      session.

 

ARTICLE III - LEGISLATIVE

 

SECTION ONE – THE STUDENT SENATE

The supreme legislative authority of the Student Government shall be vested in the Student Senate.

 

SECTION TWO – SESSIONS OF THE STUDENT SENATE

Each regular session of the Student Senate begins on the week prior to the beginning of the Fall semester and shall end on the week prior to the final exams for the Spring semester. 

 

SECTION THREE – COMPOSITION OF THE STUDENT SENATE

The Student Senate will be composed of student senators elected in processes outlined in the Electoral Code.

 

3.1.     There will be a minimum of seven senators per year level.

 

3.2.     Special Officers of the Student Senate

            The Special Officers of the Student Senate shall be:

            A.  The Student Senate President;

     B.  The Speaker Pro Tempore;

     C.  The Student Senate Secretary;

     D.  The Parliamentarian.

 

               3.2.1.  The Student Government Vice President will serve as ex-officio Senate President.

 

                      3.2.1.1. The Senate President will not be given voting privileges in the Student 

    Senate.

 

                   3.2.2.   An incumbent Senator shall be appointed by the Senate President to serve as Speaker 

                       Pro Tempore with approval of two-thirds of the Student Senate. 

 

                     3.2.2.1.In the event of the President of the Senate’s absence, the Speaker Pro 

                  Tempore shall serve as Senate President. 

 

        3.2.2.2. The Speaker Pro Tempore will not be given voting privileges in the Student 

                                    Senate when acting as Senate President.

 

       

       3.2.3. The Student Government Secretary will serve as ex-officio Student Senate 

                       Secretary.

 

                                            3.2.3.1. The Student Senate Secretary will not be given voting privileges in the Student                    

                                    Senate.

 

                     3.2.4.      An incumbent Senator shall be appointed by the Senate President to serve as Assistant 

                                                Secretary of the Student Senate, working directly under the Student Senate Secretary.

 

               3.2.4.1. In the event of the Student Senate Secretary’s absence, the Assistant Secretary 

                         of the Student Senate will serve as Student Senate Secretary. 

 

             3.2.5. An incumbent Senator shall be appointed by the Senate President to serve as the 

                      Parliamentarian of the Student Senate. 

 

           3.2.5.1. The Parliamentarian shall be the reference and adviser for all parliamentary 

                        questions of the Student Senate. 

 

        3.2.5.2. In the event that no incumbent Senator is willing or able to serve as the 

                         Parliamentarian, the Student Government Advisor shall serve as the 

                                     Parliamentarian in the interim.

 

               3.2.6. Appointed Special Officers of the Student Senate must be elected within the first 

                                  two weeks of the beginning of the Student Senate Session, with the exception of the 

                       Senate President.

 

3.3.     Duties of the Student Senate

            The Student Government Senate shall:

 A.Accredit its own membership;

 B.Establish its own meeting time;

 C.Establish its own rules of procedure, which shall be included in the Student 

Body Statutes;

 D.Enact all legislation necessary to promote the general welfare of the Student 

Body;

 E.Approve an annual Student Government budget;

 F.Provide for the compilation and publication of any Student Government 

document to inform the Student Body;

G.Govern and oversee the Student Body General Elections;

H.Have the power to review any Student Government elections and decide its validity within ten (10) days;

I.Allocate funds to its constituents and programs;

J.Have the power to override any Presidential veto with a three-fourths 

approval from the Student Senate;

K.Confirm or reject any appointments by the Student Body President and/or the    

Student Senate President with a two-thirds vote;

L.Try all impeachments and suspensions by a three-fourths majority vote 

any elected or appointed official of the Student Government for malfeasance;

M.Not enact any law abridging its powers designated by this Constitution;

N.Not deny floor privileges to elected officers of the Student Government, University Faculty members, or University Administrative officers.

 

 

 

 

ARTICLE IV – STUDENT GOVERNMENT STAFF

 

SECTION ONE – PURPOSE

The Student Government Staff shall be appointed for the assistance to the Student Body President and execution of duties not applicable to the Executive Officers or the Student Senate.

 

SECTION TWO –APPOINTMENT

Members of the Student Government Staff shall be appointed by the Student Body President and approved by two-thirds of the Student Senate.

 

SECTION THREE – COMPOSITION

The membership of the Student Government Staff shall be found in the Student Government Statutes. 

 

SECTION FOUR – ACCOUNTABILITY

The Student Body President shall have the authority to remove any member of the Student Government Staff from office as he or she sees fit.

 

ARTICLE V – GOVERNANCE

 

SECTION ONE – ILLEGAL ACTS PROHIBITION

The Student Government and all its constituents shall abide by the Constitution and Laws of the United States of America, the Constitution and Laws of the state of North Carolina not inconsistent therewith.

 

SECTION TWO – OPEN MEETINGS

The Student Government and all its constituents shall follow the Open Meetings Law of North Carolina, N.C. General Statutes Chapter 143, Article 33C.

 

SECTION THREE – OPEN RECORDS

The Student Government and all its constituents shall follow the Public Records Law of North Carolina, N.C. General Statutes Chapter 132.

 

SECTION FOUR – RULES OF ORDER

Except as otherwise stated in the Student Government Statutes, the Student Government shall follow the latest edition of Robert’s Rules of Order, Newly Revised as their parliamentary authority.

 

SECTION FIVE – ELECTIONS

The Student Government and all its constituents shall follow the Student Government Electoral Code for the Student Body General Elections.

 

SECTION SIX – MEETINGS

6.1.     Regular meetings of the Student Senate are to be held once a week, at the time established 

          by the Student Senate.

 

6.2.     Special Meetings may be called by the Student Senate President at any time, with restrictions 

          of a three (3) day notification.

 

6.3.   Quorum shall be defined as three-fifths (3/5) of the current Senator membership. No 

           business may be conducted without a quorum.

 

6.4.    Meetings may not be rescheduled or cancelled to accommodate Student Government 

           sponsored activities.

ARTICLE VI – STATUTES 

 

The Statutes of the Student Government shall be the by-laws of this Constitution and shall require passage by approval of two-thirds of the Student Senate.

 

ARTICLE VII –AMENDMENTS

 

SECTION ONE – PROCESS

All amendments to this Constitution shall require a two-thirds vote in approval of those students voting in the referendum following either:

            A.  A two-thirds majority vote from the Student Senate or, 

            B.  A petition signed by thirty percent of all members of the Student Government 

                 Association.

 

1.1.     A bill must be presented to the Student Senate two (2) weeks prior to a vote on the 

             considered amendment.

 

1.2.     The Government Operations Committee shall appoint officers with the responsibility 

             of reviewing the Student Government Constitution every two (2) years for 

             amendment.

 

             1.2.1.    This does not restrict amendments and review of the Student Government 

                           Constitution to the required two (2) years.

 

SECTION TWO – PUBLICATION

The Student Government must provide a copy of the amendment to the Pine Needle at least one week prior to the election of the amendment. 

 

VOLUME II.

The Student Government Statutes

Purpose and Scope

The Student Government Statutes are the By-Laws of the Student Government Constitu­tion. Each item of the Student Government statutes requires passage by a two-thirds majority of the Student Senate.  The Statutes supersede any conflicting customs and documents existing prior to the adoption of the Student Government Constitution.  The Statutes expand upon provisions of the Constitution, and detail procedures for imple­menting Constitutional provisions.

Chapter One: EXECUTIVE PROCESS

Section A. Appointments

1.The Student Senate President shall have the power to make appointments for the successful operation of the Student Senate.

Chapter Two: LEGISLATIVE PROCESS

Section A. Apportionment

See Article Ill, Section 1.

Section B. Officers and Committee Chairmen

The Student Senate President shall appoint a Vice President, Secretary, Vice Secretary, Parliamentarian, and Vice Parliamentarian from among the Senate membership by the first senate meeting of the year, to be approved by a two-thirds vote of the senate either before, but no later than the second senate meeting of the year.  They shall have full voting privileges and be responsible for fulfilling the outlined duties of his/her position.

1.The Vice President Shall:

a.Preside over meetings of the Senate in the President’s absence or when the President steps down from the chair;

b.Represent the Senate in an official capacity when the President is unable to do so;

c.Fulfill all other duties as outlined elsewhere in the Student Government 

Docu­ments.

2.The Secretary Shall:

a.Maintain all minutes and attendance records of the Senate;

b.Distribute all bills to the Senate and prepare a final copy of legislation considered;

c.Fulfill all other duties as outlined elsewhere in the Student Government documents.

3.The  Vice Secretary Shall:

a.Assume the responsibilities of the Secretary during his/her absence.

4.The Parliamentarian Shall:

a.Insure that the Senate follows procedures outlined in the Student Government documents and adheres to Robert’s Rules of Order.

5.The Vice Parliamentarian Shall:

a.Assume the responsibilities of the Parliamentarian during his/her absence.

6.The Committee Chairman Shall:

a.Be appointed by the Senate President;

b.Serve for the duration of the academic year and have full voting privileges;

c.Be responsible for: coordinating committee meetings, ensuring that minutes are taken of meeting discussions, and addressing issues of importance as requested by the Senate President.

Other positions necessary for the operation of the Student Senate shall be appointed by the Student Senate President with the approval of the Student Senate.

Section C. Student Senate Operating Rules

1.Order of Business

Business shall be handled in the following order:

a.Opening Ceremony

b.Roll Call

c.Reading of Minutes

d.  Presentations

e.  Open Floor

d.Committee Reports

e.Unfinished Business

f.New Business

g.Announcements

h.Roll Call

i.Adjournment

2.Quorum

A quorum shall consist of two-thirds of the actual membership of the Student Senate, and no official business shall be conducted without quorum.

3.Absences

Two unexcused absences during one school semester from Committee and/or Senate meetings will qualify an official to have his/her official rights deactivated by the Senate President, at the Senate President’s discretion, and be brought up for impeachment. An unexcused absence from a Senate, Executive or Committee meeting shall be one not excused by the presiding officer of the meeting Two tardies will result in one unexcused absence.

Attendance shall be taken at the beginning and the end of every meeting, and if an official who is initially present is absent at the end of the meeting, (s)he will be charged with one-half absence if the absence is not excused. The official wishing to be excused must submit his/her excuse in writing or in person to the Senate President by the end of the succeeding meeting of the Senate after his/her absence or one-half absence. Validity of the excuse shall be ruled on by the Student Senate President. Ruling made by the Student Senate President may be appealed to the Student Senate. 

 

a.The Secretary will monitor the number of accumulated absences and notify the 

official, whom has exceeded two unexcused absences, during or immediately following 

the senate meeting.

b.The Secretary will notify the Senate President of the official’s second unexcused 

absence.  If the senator is consecutively absent, then the Senate President will 

determine if senatorial deactivation is appropriate. However, if the Senator is present 

during the following roll call his/her senatorial rights are immediately reactivated.

Section D. Impeachment Proceedings:

The following procedures shall be adopted for all cases of impeachment of an elected or appointed student official:

1.Grounds for impeachment

a.Committing a criminal act

b.Failure to fulfill or carry out duties

c.Misuse of Student Government funds

d.Grounds noted elsewhere in these statutes or constitution

2.Procedures for Impeachment:

a.Impeachment allegations can be brought forth in petition form by:

1)five (5) Student Senators;

2)five percent (5%) of the Student Body enrollment;

3)one (1) appointed Senator for a voice plus the five (5) Student Senators

b.Charges must state explicitly and by example, evidence of malfeasance in office (any findings of a judicial board may be entered as charges against student body officials, if included in the “impeachment allegation” petition);

c.Copies of this petition must be filed with the Student Government Office and emailed to the accused officer via their Bravemail (email) account. This petition must contain the charges for impeachment.

d.For Student Senators:

1)The Student Senate President shall call a committee meeting to ascertain the credibility of the charges.

2)If the charges are judged to be insufficient for senate consideration, the Student Senate may dismiss all of the charges. The Student Senate may, by a two-thirds majority vote, elect to reduce or strike individual charges, but may not add new charges.

e.For the Student Body President, Student Senate President, and appointed student officials:

1)The Student Senate President shall immediately call a meeting of the UNCP SGA Executive Board, excluding the Treasurer, but including the Pro-Tempore.

2)The meeting shall be called to order by the Student Senate President.  If the Senate President is up for impeachment or deactivation, the Pro-Tempore assumes the Senate President’s role regarding impeachment and/or deactivation.

a)The accuser(s) shall present their charges and evidence to the commit­tee.

b) The accused shall then be allowed time to refute the allegations, and questioning shall follow.

3)If the accused is not present at this meeting, the charges shall be judged sufficient for Senate consideration unless the absence is verifiable, unavoid­able, and excused by the Senate President. In this case the charges will be brought forth at the next Senate meeting.

4)If the charges are judged insufficient for impeachment, the committee may opt for a censure or a reprimand of the official; or complete dismissal of the charges. A two-thirds majority vote may elect to reduce, or strike, individual charges, but may not add new charges.

5)If the charges are judged sufficient for Senate consideration, the Government official will be dismissed.

6)An appeal shall follow the same procedures as an impeachment trial.

3.Procedures for Impeachment Trial (Senate Consideration of Charges):

a.The trial shall come under Old Business in the Orders of the Day;

b.If the charges are against Student Body President, Student Senate President, Student Body Treasurer, or an appointed student official, then the Student Senate Vice President shall conduct the trial;

c.The accuser(s) shall state reasons to justify malfeasance and offer evidence;

d.The accused shall immediately be allowed to answer the allegations and present evidence in his/her behalf;

e.The accusers, then the accused, shall be allowed to debate their final remarks;

f.After deliberation, a vote shall take place without further debate;

g.Voting shall be by voice vote unless a second vote or roll call vote is preferred by a majority of the body. (If the accused is a member of the Student Senate, his/her vote in his/her absence shall be taken as a negative vote for impeachment.)

h.A three-fourths majority vote is necessary for impeachment conviction pursuant to the Student Body Constitution;

i.If an impeachment conviction is made, removal from office shall be immediate.

4.Post Impeachment Guidelines.

a.An elected or appointed official cannot be impeached on the same or similar charges. (This judgment is subject to a majority vote by the Senate when im­peachment proceedings are brought.)

b.A person, after being removed from office as a result of impeachment, shall be ineligible to run in future Student Body elections.

Section E. Conduct of Business

1.Except when raising privilege questions, no member of the Senate shall speak until recognized by the presiding officer. The speaker then has the floor.

2.The presiding officer shall state all motions as they are made.

3.At the request of the presiding officer, every major motion or amendment shall be submitted to the secretary in writing.

4.Only one motion may be debated at a time. After that motion has been seconded and approved, the other motion may be brought forth.

5.Following Robert’s Rules of Order, there shall be one full round of positive debate and one full round of negative debate, each debate having a time limit of five minutes, followed by a two-minute rebuttal by both sides.

6.After a motion has been made, there shall be a second which shall be made by a Senator recognized by the presiding officer. The Secretary shall be given a copy of each piece of legislation upon introduction.

No final action may be taken on legislation until copies of the legislation are made available to every member of the Student Senate.

The Senator(s) authoring legislation shall submit it to the Student Government Office in a form suitable for making copies for general Student Government distribution. The Student Senate Secretary shall be responsible for having said legislation printed.

 

Section F. Orientation of Senators

A meeting of new Senators shall be held as soon as possible after all general elections for the purpose of acquainting the new Senators with Student Senate procedure. Attendance at this meeting shall be mandatory for all new senators, unless excused by the Student Senate President, and open to all other interested persons.

Section G. Roll Call Vote

Any Senator serving as a member may call for a roll call vote or a secret ballot vote on any piece of legislation if no objections to a roll call vote or secret ballot vote are voiced. If objections are voiced, a vote shall be taken to determine the desire of the Senate. A one-third affirmative vote for a roll call or a secret ballot vote will constitute grounds for such a vote.

Chapter Three: STUDENT SENATE AND FACULTY COMMITTEES

Section A. The Student Government Association shall be comprised of the three following committees

1) Academic and Student Affairs

2) Government Operations

3) University and Community Relations

 

Section B. Duties and Responsibilities of Committees

1)Academic and Student Affairs: This committee from here on out shall be referred to as ASA. ASA is responsible for administrative contact and accountability to ensure student needs are being met in each, but not limited to, the following areas: Academic Affairs, Student Affairs, Financial Aid, Housing and Residence Life, Police and Public Safety, University Dining, Division of Information Technology (DoIT), and Athletics. ASA should report on any issues concerning these or other areas dictated necessary by the Student Senate President each Senate meeting.  ASA should also report on student issues presented and follow up on these issues with the appropriate department. In addition, ASA should inform the Senate on administration projects and advances being made within each department. ASA should also take any other duties deemed necessary by the Student Senate President.

 

2)Government Operations: This committee from here on out shall be referred to as Gov Ops. Gov Ops is responsible but not limited to, the internal operations of the student government. Gov Ops should audit and correct internal operations as it see necessary, or when an issue is brought up by a senator.  In addition, Gov Ops is in charged with maintaining and reviewing internal documents when deemed necessary, reviewing funding packets, and acting as the Commission on Elections, unless deemed otherwise. Gov Ops should also take any other duties deemed necessary by the Student Senate President.

 

2.1Legislation is forwarded to and presented by Gov Ops, whose duty it is to ensure the 

legislation is in proper format and does not violate the constitution or its bylaws. 

 

2.2Gov Ops will delegate time to author of the legislation to explain its scope and purpose. 

 

2.3The legislation to be presented/discussed should be distributed to the senate prior to the 

meeting.

 

 

3) University and Community Relations: This committee from here on out shall be referred to as UCR. UCR is responsible for outreach and communication of SGA with its constituent members, and the surrounding community. UCR responsibilities include but are not limited to, hosting all SGA Ceremonies, including SGA events, both internal and external. In addition, UCR is responsible for outreach programs on and off campus. UCR should also take any other duties deemed necessary by the Student Senate president.

 

Section C. Duties and Responsibilities of Committee Heads

1)It shall be the duties and responsibilities of each committee head to present a report on the progress of his/her committee at the weekly Senate meeting. Each committee head should host a weekly meeting with their committee at a designated location and time, to be made public. It will be the responsibility of the committee head to take attendance at each committee meeting.

1.1Absences from Meetings:

When a member of either a committee or subcommittee cannot be present for a meeting and requests to be excused, such request must be addressed to the chairman of the committee or subcommittee, preferably in writing. Two unexcused absences will result in a committee or subcommittee vote as to the removal of that member.

 

Section D. The Student Body President shall appoint students to serve on University committees.

Chapter Four: THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT DOCUMENT SYSTEM

All Student Government documents shall be kept on file under the supervision of the Student Government Secretary.

Chapter Five: FINANCES

Section A. Budget

1.It shall be the responsibility of the Student Government President to propose annually a tentative budget to the Student Senate. The Senate may make thorough investiga­tions and hold open meetings before making detailed recom­mendations concerning the amount of and manner in which the Student Government funds are to be expended for Student Government and for other co-curricular activities.

2.The budget may be amended by the Student Senate by a majority vote.

3.The SGA budget shall operate on an academic year that shall begin the first day of the semester. The academic year for a budget shall close at the close of the last business day before the new budget comes into effect.

4.Summer budgets are kept separately from academic budgets.

5.Bills incurred on a budget shall be accepted by the Student Government Treasurer for a period of one month after the budget has been closed.

Section B. Accountability of Funds Received

1.Receipts of all actual expenditures funded by the Student Senate must be submitted to the Student Government Treasurer within one week after all expenditures are made.

2.All encumbrances and actual expenditures of SGA budgetary transactions shall be entered into the SGA Office computer system.

3.It shall be the responsibility of the SGA Treasurer and/or SGA Office to record all transactions on a current and timely basis.

Section C. Student Funding

This is a special program created by SGA to help recognized student organizations receive money for special projects. Each project must be approved by the Student Funding Committee. For more information, organizations should contact the SGA Office.

Chapter Six: THE ELECTORAL CODE

 

                                       ARTICLE I – ELECTIONS PROCESS

 

SECTION ONE – COMMISSION ON ELECTIONS

The Commission on Elections will be the official body overseeing the Fall and the Spring semester elections, and shall henceforth be referred to as the “Commission”.

 

SECTION TWO – VOTING MEMBERS

All members of the Student Government, as defined by the Student Government Association Constitution, are given the right to vote in the Student Government Elections.

 

SECTION THREE – TIMELINE

3.1.     The Spring semester elections shall follow the schedule:

 A.  The Commission on Elections shall hold interest meetings three (3) weeks prior to 

                   the day of the elections;

 B.   The official Certificate of Candidacy shall be made available by the Commission on 

                   Elections three (3) weeks prior to the day of the elections;

 C.   The deadline for filing the Certificate of Candidacy shall be one (1) week prior to the 

                   day of the elections;

 D.  The campaign period shall start one (1) week prior to the day of the elections;

 E.  The Spring elections shall be held five (5) weeks prior to the Spring commencement, 

           and shall be held on the Wednesday and Thursday of the decided week.

 

3.2.The Fall semester elections shall follow the schedule:

A.The Commission on Elections shall hold interest meetings during the first week of 

the Fall semester;

B.The official Certificate of Candidacy shall be made available by the Commission on 

     Elections during the first week of the Fall semester;

C.The deadline for filing the Certificate of Candidacy shall be two (2) weeks prior to 

                the day of the elections;

D.The campaign period shall start one (1) week prior to the day of the elections;

E.The Fall elections shall be held four (4) weeks after the start of the Fall semester,

                and shall be held on the Wednesday and Thursday of the decided week.

 

SECTION FOUR – FILING PROCESS

4.1. Responsibilities of the Candidate

        A student desiring to become a candidate shall be responsible for complying with the    

        following requirements:

A.Attending the interest meeting for the semester elections;

B.Filing the Certificate of Candidacy within the set deadlines, as outlined in Section

                Three, Timeline, to the Office of Student Involvement and Leadership;

C.Verify their name on the ballot by 5 PM on the Friday before the week of 

                elections.

 

4.2. Responsibilities of the Commission

  During the elections period, the Commission must:

A.Announce the dates and locations of interest meetings in a timely manner;

B.Notify candidates of their approval in relation to their candidacy;

C.Invalidate any certificates that do not meet the set requirements, or may have 

                provided falsified, misleading, or incomplete information;

      D. Publish the final ballots after 5 PM on the Friday before the week of elections.

 

                                      ARTICLE II – CANDIDACY REQUIREMENTS

 

SECTION ONE – STUDENT GOVERNMENT OFFICERS

All officers of the Student Government must:

A.Be a current member of the Student Government, as defined in the Student 

                Government Association Constitution;

B.Have a cumulative GPA of 2.5 on a 4.0 scale, prior to filing his/her Certificate of 

                Candidacy.

 

SECTION TWO – EXECUTIVE BOARD OFFICERS

The President, Vice-President, and Treasurer of the must:

A.Not hold the office of President, Vice President, or Treasurer  in any other student 

                or fraternal-type organization on campus during their term in office;

B.Have been a Senator of the Student Government for at least one (1) complete

                academic semester.

 

SECTION THREE – EXECUTIVE BOARD RESTRICTIONS 

Any student interested in running for Student Body President or Student Body 

Vice President must run on a complete ticket of Student Body President and Student Body Vice President. No applicant shall be allowed to run for Student Body President or Student Body Vice President on an incomplete ticket. 

 

SECTION FOUR – AT-LARGE SENATORS

Members of the Student Body who wish to become an officer of the Student Government after the allotted elections period may apply for membership to the Student Senate as an At-Large Senator. To become an At-Large Senator, students must:

 

     A.Fill out the At-Large Senator application form completely and submit it to the Student 

          Body Secretary or the Commission on Elections;

B.Allow to be interviewed by the Commission on Elections when deemed 

          necessary;

C.Present him/herself to the Student Senate, to be scheduled by the Commission on 

           Elections;

D.Be elected to the Senate by a three-fourths (3/4) majority of the Student Senate, 

           one week after his/her presentation to the Student Senate.

 

                                            ARTICLE III – CAMPAIGNS

 

SECTION ONE – CAMPAIGN PERIOD

The campaign period shall be outlined by the Commission on Elections and will be only one (1) week.

 

SECTION TWO – CAMPAIGN RESTRICTIONS

During the campaign period, candidates may:

A.Post flyers and posters only on designated locations, that will be outlined by the 

               Commission on Elections;

B.Not tear down any flyers or posters put up by other candidates who are running for 

                similar offices;

C.Not exceed the noise-level, similar to the restriction on car stereos, of 25-feet from 

the source;

D.Not give away items worth more than two dollars ($2) each, excluding shirts;

E.Not post campaign materials obtrusive to University foot traffic;

F.Not post flyers on painted surfaces;

G.Be disqualified from the elections if they do not follow the above rules.

 

                                     ARTICLE IV – BALLOTS AND POLLING

 

SECTION ONE – ELECTION DAYS

Election days for the Spring and the Fall semesters shall be held in accordance to Article I Section Three, Timeline.

 

SECTION TWO – BALLOTING

2.1.     The Commission must publish and announce the final ballot after 5 PM on the Friday 

         before the week of elections.

 

2.2. The order of names on the ballot shall be agreed upon by the Commission. If no 

 order is voted on, the names shall appear in alphabetical order.

 

2.3. Aliases shall be used on the ballot upon request by the candidate. However, legal 

        names shall be used in precedence to aliases unless requested. 

 

SECTION THREE  - POLLING

3.1.     A link to access the ballot shall be emailed to students on the Monday and Tuesday of 

            the elections week.

 

3.2.    In addition to the email, the Commission shall send a reminder email through the 

          Office of Student Involvement and Leadership at the moment the polls open.

 

3.3.    Physical polling stations shall be opened on the day(s) of elections.

 

3.3.1.     The Commission shall be responsible for establishing locations and times for

              the physical polling stations.

 

     3.3.2.     Only members of the Commission shall be allowed to operate the physical 

                         polling stations. 

 

           3.3.3.     Candidates must keep 100-feet away from polling stations except for voting 

                  purposes. 

 

SECTION FOUR – WRITE-IN VOTES

There shall be one (1) line for each electable office for the purposes of write-in votes.

 

SECTION FIVE – DETERMINATION OF WINNERS

5.1.   Single Seat Winners

    For any race in which only one position is available, the winner shall be determined by   

          a simple majority (greater than 50%). 

 

5.1.1.     In the event that no candidate receives the majority vote, a run-off election

              shall be held.

 

5.1.1.1.     The top two (2) candidates will be in the run-off. If there is a tie for the 

                                   second seat, all three candidates will be in the run-off.

 

5.2.    Multiple Seat Winners

      For any race in which multiple seats available, the top candidates will receive a seat     

           until all the seats are filled.

 

5.2.1.     There will only be a run-off election if there is a tie for the last seat.

 

5.3.    Write-in Winners

    In order to be elected by write-in, the student must meet all qualifications for the 

          office in question. 

 

SECTION SIX – RUN-OFF ELECTIONS

Run-off elections shall be conducted under the same regulations as the preceding elections.

 

Additional Information

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke supports the protections available to members of its community under all applicable Federal laws, including Titles VI and VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Sections 799A and 845 of the Public Health Service Act, the Equal Pay and Age Discrimination Acts, the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Executive Order 11246.

The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is committed to equality of educational opportunity and does not discriminate against applicants, students, or employees based on race, color, creed, national origin, religion, sex, age, sexual orientation, or disability or because of the individual's honorable service in the Armed Services of the United States. Moreover, The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is open to people of all races and actively seeks to promote diversity by recruiting and enrolling American Indian, Asian, Black and Hispanic students. The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award Baccalaureate and Master's level degrees.

UNC Pembroke is also accredited by or is a member of:

  • The North Carolina Association of Colleges and Universities
  • The National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education
  • The National Association of Schools of Music
  • The American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education
  • The American Council on Education
  • The North Carolina State Board of Education
  • The American Association of State Colleges and Universities
  • The Council on Social Work Education
  • The National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration
  • The American Chemical Society
  • The Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education
  • The Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education