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Biology

Archive for 2016-2017

Dr. Ben Bahr Dr. Ben Bahr Named 2017 Oliver Max Gardner Award Winner

Catching up with Ethan Sanford, '16 Ethan Sanford

Anna Sanford presents poster at conference Anna Sanford's Environmental Journey to the Classroom

Graduation Photos Spring 2017 COMPASS students graduate

Dr. David Maxwell Dr. David Maxwell: Commemorating 50 Years

Tonya Locklear Exhibits Earth Women Arts Tonya Locklear and Earth Women Arts

 faculty participants in podcast about soil Drs. Kaitlin Campbell and Debby Hanmer featured in Audio Podcast about Soil

Dr. John Roe and Joseph Nacy Dr. John Roe and Joseph Nacy Publish a Natural History Note in Herpetological Review 48(1), 2017: Terrapene carolina carolina (Eastern Box Turtle) and Clemmys guttata (Spotted Turtle). Interspecific Interaction. See pages 181-182 of the Natural History Notes to read the paper.

 TriBeta Banquet Showcases Research TriBeta inductees

"Kids" booth at NC Regional Science Fair Kids in the Garden Engage Science

Biology Prominent at 2017 PURC COMPASS students and Dr. Maria Santisteban

Sandefur Lab Researchers Sandefur Lab to be Featured in UNCP News

Robbie Juel Presents Poster at Conference  Robbie Juel Presents Research Poster at Regional Conference

Cheyenne Lee in Sandefur LabCheyenne Lee Awarded Exceptional Research Opportunity

 

Glaxo Scholars Attend GSK Women in Science Meeting

Dr. Kaitlin Campbell Lends Expertise for YouTube Video (above)

Dr. Crystal Walline Joins Biology Faculty Dr. Crystal Walline

Dr. Andrew Ash Dr. Andrew Ash Presents Salamander Research

Dr. Maria Santisteban Aids Science Learning in Dr. Maria Santisteban demonstrates photosynthesis exercise
Public Schools  

Brandi Guffey and Kelly the African elephant Brandi Guffey: Day in the Life of an Elephant Intern

Prof. Erika Young Earns Ph.D. Degree Erika Young

David PedersenDavid Pedersen Completes Summer Scholars Program in Regenerative Medicine

Dr. Kaitlin Campbell Joins Biology Faculty Dr. Kaitlin Campbell in the field

Dr. Conner Sandefur and his undergraduate researchersSandefur Lab Explores Genetics of Medicinal Plants

RISE Research Posters Draw a Crowd RISE poster presentation

Dr. John Roe Dr. John Roe's Research Shows Urbanization Reduces Turtle Survivorship

Biology Professors Assist in Science Expo 2017

Dr. Erika YoungDr. Erika Young helps a student photograph microscopic pond life

In September, the University hosted Science EXPO, an event to promote science awareness among the public. This event followed on the heals of the STEMville Science Symposium, held on campus last March, which was likewise designed to enhance science communication between scientists and the public. Science EXPO was a joint effort of the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center’s IMPACTS Program and the UNC Pembroke College of Arts & Sciences.  Drs. Erika Young and Crystal Walline of the UNCP Biology Department were among the scientists who provided activities that were both entertaining and educational for the day-long event.  

The IMPACTS (Inspiring Meaningful Programs and Communication Through Science) Program funded last spring's STEMville Science Symposium.  Scientists from UNCP and Fayetteville Technical Community College (FTCC) were joined by nursing students and other collaborators from the UNCP community to launch creative, hands-on science activities.  The conference-style symposium hosted more than a hundred sixth and seventh grade students from 11 middle schools in Robeson County. 

Members of the UNCP Biology faculty who participated were Drs. Velinda Woriax (department chair), Kaitlin Campbell, Crystal Walline, and Erika Young.  Biology alumni Chrisha Dolan (now on the faculty at FTCC) and Kameron Richardson also participated.  Activities involved carnivorous plants, pond water, insect pollinators, epidemiology, and asthmatic lungs.

Junior members of the Biology faculty who participated in Science EXPO and STEMville are on their way to becoming Morehead Science Ambassadors.  The IMPACTS Program is funded by the GlaxoSmithKline Foundation and is the joint effort of the Morehead Planetarium and Science Center and the North Carolina Science Fair.

Chrisha Dolan Dr. Kaitlin Campbell
Chrisha Dolan (left) and Dr. Kaitlin Campbell (right)

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Whitney Pittman

Student

Student Degree

B.S.

Student Major

Biology with a Track in Botany

Student Hometown

Tar Heel, NC

Biography:

Hello, my name is Whitney Pittman. I am a senior here at UNC Pembroke, working on my bachelor degree in biology with a botany track.  I have lived in North Carolina my whole life near the small town of Tar Heel in Bladen County. I was taken out of public school in third grade because of bullying.  My family has worked in farming and construction as long as anyone can remember, and I assumed I would follow suit, so I started working at a young age. That is until I got very sick when I was 18 and lost my vision for six months. I was diagnosed with Idiopathic intracranial hypertension, and it changed my life. After regaining my sight, though now I wear glasses, I decided I would live my life to the fullest, not letting people tell me what to be, and to follow my dreams to travel the world and to work in research. I acquired my GED and my associate’s degree in science at Robeson Community College.  There I met teachers who encouraged me to go further, and with their guidance I applied for UNCP. Since then I have traveled all over the continental United States.  I have seen the Pacific Ocean, seen mountains and deserts, and it’s all because of the kindness of others, and a little self-determination.

 Why did you choose to attend UNCP?

The main reason I chose to attend UNCP is because it offers a degree with a botany track, and it has a wonderful program for those who transfer with an associate’s degree.  I was also the first person in my family to go to college, so I relied heavy on advice from teachers and staff at the Robeson Community College, and Miss Courtney Kilgore, a professor who I respect greatly, encouraged me to go further than an associate degree.  She suggested UNCP, where she attended, and she knew some of the staff.  Lastly, when I told my family that’s where I wanted to attend, they told me about how much UNCP has helped bring new life to the town of Pembroke, and how it was helping the area. With that said, UNCP was my first choice for college.

 What do you like best about UNCP?

It’s the diversity of students and faculty and the small “hometown” feel the college has. You get lots of attention from faculty and staff, and the students are pretty friendly. The college also offers lots of opportunities for those who are interested and who apply themselves to what they love.

What are your post-graduation plans?

After I graduate I plan to apply to graduate school and to get a PhD degree in plant pathology. I’m currently looking at NC State University, Purdue, and the University of Georgia. My goal is to work doing research for the government under the USDA to help control the spread of crop pests and disease, and to work on ways of controlling invasive insects that are harming our forests.

Please comment on your research experiences on and off campus:

I have had a lot of amazing opportunities since I got my associate’s degree. I have been to the Botanical Research Institute of Texas to meet the staff and to look around the departments. I have done internship work for the US Department of Energy at the Office of River Protection in Washington state, dealing with management of the remediation operation at the Hanford site.  Last summer, I started an NSF REU internship at Miami University in Ohio, where I worked with Dr. Bruce Steinly, doing research on native pollinator populations in urban environments. We are working on publishing the data in a peer-reviewed journal with the help of Dr. Kaitlin Campbell here at UNCP.  As for what I am doing now, I am doing research on native Lumbee plants and their effects as bacterial inhibitors. The results are mixed so far, but I am going to the Annual Biomedical Research Conference for Minority Students (ABRCMS) in November.

  Whitney Pittman

Whitney Pittman Whitney Pittman

 

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Robbie Juel

Student

Student Degree

B.S.

Student Major

Biology with a Track in Botany

Student Hometown

Fayetteville, North Carolina

Biography: 

I am a medically retired, Army 7th Special Forces Group veteran pursuing a degree in Biology with a track in Botany. I became interested in science at an early age, living in the hills of southwest Missouri. I joined the Army after graduating high school and volunteered for the Army’s 1st Ranger Battalion, where I spent many hours in the woods honing the needed skills. I later volunteered for the Army Special Forces and attended the second ever class of the Special Forces Assessment and Selection (SFAS). Upon graduation of SFAS, I was assigned to Okinawa, Japan, with 1st Special Forces Group and was later assigned to the 7th Special Forces Group located at Fort Bragg, North Carolina. During my time in the Army, I managed to travel to most parts of the globe. The two areas that stick out in my mind for their beauty was Malaysia, because of its untouched jungles, and Guatemala, because of the simple way of life and the friendly locals. The mountains of Guatemala will always have a special place in my heart. When I left the military, I worked on and built motorcycles for a few years until I started to further my education, which brings me to the present day.  

Why did you choose to attend UNCP? 

When I started researching universities to attend, I was looking for three specific things. It had to be within driving distance of Fayetteville, it had to have a botany program, and it had to have smaller class sizes. These were important to me as I am established in Fayetteville, and I had attended other university classes in which I had never uttered a word to the professor. I felt I needed to be able to reach out to my professors and to ask questions and seek guidance.  The University of North Carolina at Pembroke has not disappointed me. The level of instruction, research opportunities, and attentiveness of the facility and staff is of the highest caliber. 

What do you like best about UNCP? 

I have always liked to be challenged and have found that most challenges can be accomplished with the right approach and mentorship. There is no way that I could finish my degree in Biology without the guidance and support offered to me at UNCP. My lecture and lab questions were always explained in a manner I could understand with as much time as needed. Never rushed. Chemistry I, II and Organic Chemistry were extremely hard for me to grasp. The Chemistry Department professors worked with me and set up tutors as needed. This comes back to my original statement of “most challenges can be accomplished with the right approach and mentorship.” This was afforded to me at UNCP on many levels; that is what I like the most!

What are your post-graduation plans?

My graduation plans are to attend a graduate school where I can continue my studies in plant sciences. My research contributions to the University of North Carolina at Pembroke have concentrated on plant communities of Sampson’s Landing, Robeson County, North Carolina. I have presented research posters at the Annual Meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists, North Carolina Academy of Science, State of North Carolina Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium, and numerous Pembroke Undergraduate Research and Creativity symposia. My awards include the Robert Britt Memorial Scholarship presented by the Department of Biology, Summer USA Grant through Pembroke Undergraduate Research and Creativity Center, and a Student Scholarship Support grant for materials and supplies used for Sampson’s Landing research. 

Robbie Juel in the Green Swamp Preserve Robbie Juel  
Robbie Juel in the Green Swamp Preserve (left photo) and at the annual meeting of the Association of Southeastern Biologists

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Faculty in Action

Amy Kish

Student

Student Degree

B.S.

Student Major

Environmental Science

Student Minor

Certification in GIS

Student Hometown

Akron, Ohio

Biography:

I graduated from high school in 1991.  During my senior year, when everyone was figuring out what they wanted to pursue in college, I was advised of something I’ll never forget. I wanted to do something with science, mainly biology.  However, I was told I should focus on something in the liberal arts, because I just didn’t have the mind for higher level science and/or math. I took that to heart for years. Huge mistake! 

I started college in the early 90’s at The University of Akron, a school of approximately 80,000 students. I also attended Kent State University (during the 90’s), which is another large university. I was originally a Special Education major. I never completed the programs because of several factors. First, the program just didn’t seem to fit what I wanted to do. Second, I was blessed to become a mom. I decided to set my education aside to do the greatest job I could think of, raise my son Spencer. 

I started back to school, many years later, at a small technical school in South Carolina to pursue a nursing degree. I took one microbiology course, and I was hooked. I knew my passion for science had never left. I moved to North Carolina, and after getting settled, I started to look for a school that would allow me to pursue my passion and to finally get a degree in science; that led me to UNC Pembroke. 

Why did you choose to attend UNCP? 

The main reason I chose UNCP is the small student-teacher ratio. Having attended very large universities in the past, small class sizes were important to me. I also needed to be able to commute to a campus.

What do you like best about UNCP? 

The thing I like best about UNCP is the accessibility of the faculty to the students. I don’t feel like a number here. I know all my professors and feel comfortable talking to any of them about school or home. I like that I can even approach professors I haven’t even had for classes to talk about their experiences in graduate schools or just bounce ideas off them for possible future plans. The faculty has never treated me differently, being a nontraditional student. 

What are your post-graduation plans? 

I am graduating from UNCP in December 2018. (Remember that advisor I mentioned who told me I didn’t have the mind for science? I’ll be graduating with honors, hopefully Magna Cum Laude!) As of now, I have not solidified my post-graduation plans, but I am leaning towards the PhD program in Marine Biology at UNC Chapel Hill. I will be applying to several other programs as well. I hope whatever my future holds, I will be able to work in the estuary system somewhere along the east coast. I am interested in the interaction of salt and fresh water and the organisms living there. The first thing I have planned immediately after graduation, however, is to prepare for my son to graduate from high school in June 2019. 

Please comment on your research experiences: 

I was lucky enough to be offered the opportunity to become a RISE Fellow at UNCP this past summer and into the 2017-2018 academic year. I have been working with Dr. John Roe on eastern box turtle research and the relationship prescribed fire plays in the species’ ecology. I presented a research poster at the end-of-summer RISE poster session, and I will be presenting at several conferences in the spring of 2018, including the ASB (Association of Southeastern Biologists) in Myrtle Beach in March, the AAG (American Association of Geographers) National Conference in New Orleans in April, and in multiple other state conferences.

Amy Kish and Hannah Swartz Amy Kish and Kayla Amy Kish Middle photo: Amy Kish in the microbiology lab

 

Hannah Swartz

Student

Student Degree

B.S.

Student Major

Environmental Science

Student Hometown

Ocala, Florida

Biography:

Born and raised in Florida, I met my husband Carleton in our hometown. At the time, he was enlisting in the US Army and I was moving away for school. I attended state college at the beach, and it was there that my love for biology and environmental science began. I volunteered for about a year at a nonprofit zoo, the Brevard Zoo, where I ran kayak tours through the African wildlife exhibit and taught about conservation. From there, I began gearing my associate's degree towards biology and decided that was the dream I wanted to pursue. After marrying my husband, we moved to Ft. Bragg, and I began my education at UNC Pembroke. We have a hyperactive Australian Shepherd named Loki, and all three of us like to spend our free time outdoors at the beach, hiking, or camping. I’m currently very involved on campus and love every minute of it! If I’m not in class, you can find me in my hammock, or in the campus garden, or working on improving our campus’s sustainability.

Why did you choose to attend UNCP?

Before moving to North Carolina, I researched colleges near and around the Fayetteville area. Coincidentally, one of my friends back home had gone to UNC Pembroke and recommended I look into it. So, there it began.  I read through the UNCP biology and environmental science programs and knew that’s where I wanted to study.

What do you like best about UNCP?

The opportunities available at UNC Pembroke are constantly expanding. Throughout the few years I’ve been here, I’ve been involved in the Biology Club, the Greener Coalition, the Office of Sustainability, the RISE program, and now Kids in the Garden (a lot, I know). Not only are these opportunities great for furthering your career, they are also rewarding experiences. Being involved with these organizations has really helped me to inspire students’ involvement on environmental issues. Working for the Office of Sustainability, I feel like I can make a difference on this campus and better our environmental impact and the experience for my fellow students. So that’s what I like the best about UNCP, the opportunities and student involvement that really make our institution stand out from the rest.

What are your post-graduation plans?

The big question is what will I do after my time at UNCP.  Since working as a Summer RISE Fellow and conducting research alongside Dr. Kelly and Grant Wood, I have a new dream to attend graduate school and to continue research. The combination of field and laboratory research with the potential to answer environmental questions has inspired me to continue my education. I’ve also had the opportunity, with the Kids in the Garden program, to teach high school kids how to develop and implement their own scientific research on the health of honey bees. Being able to inspire younger students to study important environmental questions has truly been a rewarding experience, and I hope to continue this work in the future.  

Hannah Swartz and Kids in the Garden Hannah and Carleton Swartz Loki Photo on the far left: Hannah Swartz and Kids in the Garden make pollen slides

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Cora Bright

Student

Student Degree

B.S.

Student Major

Biology with a Molecular Biology Track

Student Hometown

Ellenboro, NC

Hello! My name is Cora Bright, and I am a senior here at UNC Pembroke.  I work in Dr. Maria Santisteban’s lab in the RISE Program, researching a yeast histone called Htz. I have been in RISE and working with Dr. Santisteban since my sophomore year. I am also the Vice-Chair of the Student Honors Council and have been on the council since my freshman year. Before enrolling at UNCP, I attended the North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM), which is where I started doing research and where I first decided that a career in the sciences was right for me. I had always wanted to be a teacher but had never considered being a research professor until I took my first class and was able to run my own experiment on planaria, which are small flatworms. Since then I have been pursuing research opportunities because I feel that the lab is the place where I belong.  During my freshman year at UNCP, I worked in Dr. Ben Bahr’s lab, studying Alzheimer's Disease, and I quickly learned that working with a mouse model was not for me. This was mainly because, to study Alzheimer's Disease -- a disease of the brain --you need to harvest the brains of little mice, and this was something I found a little hard to stomach. This is why during sophomore year when I entered RISE, I found a place in Dr. Santisteban’s lab working with yeast, which is much easier to perform experiments on. 

Why did you choose to attend UNCP?

 I chose to attend UNCP for two main reasons. The first is its geographical location. Pembroke is a small town; no one is arguing about that, but after attending high school in Durham, a big city, I really wanted to get back to my small town roots. I like the big city just fine and am even applying to grad schools back in Durham.  However, after such a rigorous high school experience, I really wanted to spend some time away from all the hustle and bustle, and Pembroke was the perfect place for that. The second reason I chose UNCP was the cost. I had applied to seven different schools and was accepted into all of them, but they offered no financial aid, making them all out of reach anyways. So I made the decision I thought was smart and came to UNCP where I could receive the same quality education as somewhere like NC State University or UNC Chapel Hill, but not drown in student loan debt. 

What do you like best about UNCP?

I really like that at Pembroke, because the school is so small, it's very easy to make connections with your professors. A large part of getting into graduate school is your three letters of recommendation, and I honestly feel that if I had gone to a bigger school where I was just a number, I wouldn't have as close connections with my professors to ask for those recommendations. I also probably wouldn't have been able to join a lab my freshman year or get as much research time, simply because unlike at a large school, the faculty at Pembroke is so connected to their students. 

What are your post-graduation plans?

I am applying to graduate school in the hopes of getting a doctorate in genetics. I would love to work in a plant biology lab studying, at the molecular level, how to make food better for others and easier to grow in the environment. My main passion is the reduction of pesticide use through better genetically modified food. 

Please comment on your research experiences:

As previously mentioned, I started research at NCSSM, working with planaria.  During my freshman year at UNCP, I worked on mice in Dr. Bahr's lab, and during my sophomore year, I joined Dr. Santisteban in her quest to solve what Htz functions occur in yeast. However, what I have not mentioned is the research I did in a plant molecular biology lab this summer. I worked in Riverside, California, in Dr. Venu Reddy's lab, studying plant growth in relation to the WUSCHEL-CLAVATA3 feedback loop. Feedback between two plant proteins controls plant shoot growth, and over this summer I was given an opportunity to study this feedback by creating a forced dimer version of WUSCHEL to see how the plant would grow when the protein was forced to bind to DNA as a dimer. It was a wonderful experience, and I found that working with plants just might be my true calling after all. 

 Cora Bright Cora Bright and RISE students at ABRCMS conference Cora Bright

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Amelia C. Brown

Student

Student Degree

B.S.

Student Major

Chemistry

Student Hometown

Dunn, NC

Biography:

Surprisingly, I haven’t always loved science. As a child, I actually struggled in the subject but could typically manage to get a “B” in class. My mom always made me write “super sentences” with my spelling words. While in math I caught on very quickly. So, those subjects were never an issue. I remember one instance specifically. I brought home a progress report, and my grade in science was a “C.” My dad gave me this look and said “I know you can do better than this, this isn’t you.” And instead of yelling at me, he helped me. By the time report cards came out, I had an “A.” As time went on my uncles helped me complete a few science projects, which made me more interested in what science was all about. However, I first truly fell in love with science when I enrolled in Physical Science with Mrs. Dupree. I was always excited to go to class and learn everything and anything she could teach me. Many people told me that some of the topics covered in this class would be continued in chemistry classes. So I signed up for Honors Chemistry with Genia Morris. Students spoke highly of her at my high school. When I got in that classroom, something happened. I can’t explain it, but as time went on I felt like I belonged there, as if I had found what I was supposed to do. The only thing I hated was that I was a senior when I took this class. If I could go back in time, I would take the class sooner, so that I could have taken AP Chemistry (a more in-depth course) before graduating. It was because of this class that I applied for colleges knowing what I wanted to study.

I only applied to UNC Pembroke and Campbell University. Both schools had great chemistry departments, but I chose UNCP. I was able to apply to and get into the Esther G. Maynor Honors College during the summer before freshman year. Ever since I stepped onto this campus, amazing things have happened to me. I am a part of the Lambda Sigma Honor Society, COMPASS Scholarship Program, Gamma Sigma Epsilon Chemistry Honors Society, and this year I was also fortunate to be selected as a Glaxo Women in Science Scholar. This university has helped me become more successful than I had ever dreamed I would be.

Why did I choose UNCP?

I chose UNCP for many reasons. The University was an hour from my hometown, whereas Campbell was only 20 minutes from my house. I wanted to get the full college experience, and I couldn’t get that by staying at home and attending Campbell. I wanted a distance where I wouldn’t feel homesick. I also heard amazing things about the school and surrounding areas. Being accepted into the honors college also played a factor into my decision. Overall, Pembroke checked more boxes off my list than did Campbell. Surprisingly, the first time I actually saw the campus was during my freshman orientation weekend. Once the weekend ended, I knew I had made the right choice.

What do I like most about UNCP?

 One of the most comforting things about UNCP is that professors will remember you. At larger institutions some professors may not know any of their students on a personal level. Here at UNCP the professors make every effort to get to know you and help you succeed. I don’t think I could’ve accomplished as many things as I have if I would’ve attended a different university.

What are my post-graduation plans?

I will be graduating UNCP in the spring of 2018. During the spring semester I will be applying to postbaccalaureate programs. After attending a postbac program, I would like to attend graduate school. I am unsure of what I would like to study in graduate school, but the possibilities are endless.

What research experiences have I had?

This summer I had the opportunity of conducting research through UNC Chapel Hill’s SPIRE Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. I was mentored by Dr. Dan Brown in the lab of Dr. Jiandong Liu. My lab partner and I worked on two projects together.

  • Project1: Neuregulin1-III is critical for cardiac trabecular maturation and innervation in zebrafish.

In the first project we studied the Neuregulin-1 (Nrg1) ErbB2/ErbB4 pathway in zebrafish. This pathway plays a critical role in cardiac development, function, and homeostasis. The loss of all three isoforms of Nrg1 or ErbB2/4 was developmentally lethal in rodent models. Previous studies have demonstrated that the loss of Neuregulin-1 isoforms I and II did not cause lethality or have an impact on cardiac development in zebrafish. Interestingly, the complete loss of Nrg1 (pan knockout) was not lethal in zebrafish, but did cause structural and functional defects in juvenile and young adult zebrafish. Therefore, we sought to describe the cardiac outcomes following the loss of Nrg1-III. We specifically focused on how the loss would affect trabecular density and cardiomyocyte cell count. We crossed Nrg1-III mutants in transgenic backgrounds that label nuclei and cardiomyocytes. Unfortunately, we were not able to go any further with this project because of time limitations. However, once the fish reach SL-10-20 they will be sectioned via cryostat and then examined using fluorescent confocal microscopy. If zebrafish lacking Nrg1-III have comparable trabecular density and cardiomyocyte reductions when compared to the pan-Nrg1 knockout, it will suggest that Nrg1-III is critical for cardiac trabecular maturation and innervation of the zebrafish ventricle.

  • Project 2: Developmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon exposure reduces cardiac sarcomere size and cell morphology in zebrafish.

In the second project, we studied how developmental exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) would impact cardiac morphology on a cellular level. Studies have shown that high concentrations of certain PAHs will cause defects in cardiac morphology as fish develop. The cardiac defect is misalignment of the atrium and ventricle in the fish. Until now that was as far in detail as studies had gone. Therefore, we sought to understand what was happening on a cellular level. In our study, transgenic zebrafish labeled with cmlc2:Cypher GFP and cmlc2:Mkate caxx were crossed to mark cardiac sarcomeres and cardiomyocyte cell borders. Embryos in the 4-8 cell stage were then exposed to varying dilutions of a complex PAH mixture derived from sediments collected at the Elizabeth River Superfund Site. Larval hearts were then imaged and assessed at 120 hours post fertilization (hpf) via fluorescent confocal microscopy and image J, respectively. Our findings suggest that developmental PAH exposure resulting in atrium and ventricle misalignment was accompanied by sarcomere shortening and decreased cell size. While this study strengthens our basic understanding of how PAHs specifically impact cardiomyocyte and cell morphology, we cannot ultimately say which precedes the other.

Amelia Brown at summer poster presentation Amelia Brown Amelia BrownPhoto to the far left: Amelia Brown at summer research poster presentation

 

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